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Reader Comments (9)

Posted: Mar 21st 2012 12:31PM FireWraith said

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Runescape is a grind because you reach a point where you can't level up any trade without doing something like sitting at the water and repeatedly spam-fishing for hours. Or, as you even mention in your article, grinding fletching.

If your goal is to increase your level (as is typically the case in games) then you'll face a grind. Whether you admit that it's a grind or not (hypnotic = grind, imo) is up for debate.

Posted: Mar 21st 2012 12:51PM AltarofScience said

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Any game you spend 1000 hours in is a grind. You can't get rid of it. The only ostensible exceptions are games like LoL and Starcraft which are pure pvp.

Posted: Mar 21st 2012 12:55PM Bryonis said

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Trade and crafting are great fun! I have to say I used to really love EVE:Online for its markets (which still exist, I just don't play anymore). I would happily travel from one system to another, buying up modules for cheap and then selling them back for a nice profit.
Good fun :)

Posted: Mar 21st 2012 1:11PM (Unverified) said

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@Bryonis

I was just going to chime in about Eve! I never got into the space combat much, but I also found myself playing the market. There was just something rewarding about taking the extra jump or two to make more profit!
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Posted: Mar 21st 2012 12:58PM (Unverified) said

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You might want to mention that the "Gregarious Grocer" app for Glitch costs $1.99.

Posted: Mar 21st 2012 1:16PM Beau Hindman said

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@(Unverified) Oh, shoot, thanks for pointing that out! I've talked about it in the past so I'll bet I took it as common knowledge by now -- within the world of my columns. Thanks!

Beau
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Posted: Mar 21st 2012 1:48PM roberticvs said

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I love the trade aspect of games. I've played many a tycoon game, and have dabbled in WURM and others. It's very fun to get a sense that you're cultivating something (like a trade network, a fleet, a caravan, a relationship with regular buyers) and that you're contributing positively to a game community.

My favorite single-player game was a little-known title called Trade Empires, by Frog City/Eidos.

When it comes to MMO's, developers have a helluva time trying to develop a self-sustaining economy, so it's little wonder they don't experiment with new ways to make it entertaining to the enterprising player. It's much more sustainable and do-able to assume "players will spend X amount of time to achieve Y results, and put Z number of Item 123 on the market." and let everyone be an adventurer. It's too bad. I would love to see some innovation.

Eve Online? Give me something besides being a floating brain in a sink, please. I need context in order to put my time into becoming a tycoon. Thank you.

Posted: Mar 21st 2012 3:03PM scfs123 said

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One of my saddest things with crafting in P2P MMO's.
ITS SO HARD TO SELL ALMSOT EVERYTHING QQ.

I got on glitch, and i became a..well..waffle maker.
I've made thousands of waffles on glitch, and every day i get on i've made nice profits and all my waffles have sold lol

Then i sell herbs straight up from my house, and make even more profit from that.

I absolutely love it.
Then i get on WoW, craft hordes of items, have 9/10 items of it expire to my mailbox, then get sadface=(
Glyphs/Gems/Gear/flasks if its not the "latest epic that requiers drops from the latest raid!" it just doesnt' sell well and makse crafting very sadface.

Thats not to pick on WoW, SWTOR does the same thing to me. Spend all this time reverse engineering to get epic recipes!...That no one wants to even pay cost for.

Then i turn around and sell companion gifts for 5x my asking price of said epic. Tehehe..he...hah../sadface.

Posted: Mar 22nd 2012 2:02AM (Unverified) said

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@scfs123

Unfortunate but true, most MMOs have very flawed economies because there is no resemblance of a supply and demand chain. The games Beau mentions in his articles are certainly among the minority in that not only are the economies vibrant and engaging but actually necessary. The problem with most MMO design and ingame economies these days is that items are usually forever, and most of the disposable items can usually be bought off NPC vendors.



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