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Reader Comments (12)

Posted: Mar 1st 2012 6:15PM Sock66 said

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OTG represent

Posted: Mar 1st 2012 6:20PM (Unverified) said

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I started a very small guild 6 months before SWTOR started, and abandoned it in January.

However, I made sure I passed ownership over to another active player before doing so, and didn't feel a need to post a "Why I'm leaving!!1!" rant. I don't care if the game is successful or not, but if my friends are enjoying themselves than I'm happy for them. I don't need to ruin the experience for others to justify my personal reasons for leaving.

~Vaish

Posted: Mar 1st 2012 6:23PM Space Cobra said

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Good article for players too, especially about being careful about "buyer's remorse" and that applies to *_ANY_MMO_*!

Again, it can be fun to join everyone in the "good spirits" and "expecting the new game" but you got to keep your feet grounded, especially if the player tends to throw hissy fits or swings into muted depression and commentary.

Wait times are always excellent. If you don't want to wait, just make sure you go in with eyes wide open and look at all pre-beta/beta release info critically.

Posted: Mar 1st 2012 9:31PM Yog said

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This happened a lot with the warhammer release too, my guild included. I joined a guild for warhammer several months before the release but then we all were disappointed and slowly stopped playing.

When we realized Warhammer wasn't doing it for us we had a guild meeting and decided to change the warhammer guild into a gaming community. We lost a number of players at this point and several more during the years but we also picked up more as we played random games. We decided a year or so ago SWTOR would be our next official foray into MMOs. I played for a while but then got bored...so we'll see what happens next.

Posted: Mar 1st 2012 11:42PM Rheem said

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I think in the long run if you're not enjoying yourself you need to let the guild know, and leave asap. If you stay around too long you'll just resent your guild members more. and they'll return it. If you slowly become more and more inactive they'll leave of their own accord.

Posted: Mar 2nd 2012 5:44AM Wic said

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So is this a paid for damage control blog for Bioware or is it really about guilds. I take the view if you are not happy with a game regardless of who you are with you should leave. You don't eat in the same bad restaurant twice so why should you game that way.

You don't have to say goodbye either in each game I have left I take with me new friends on my msn list and new contacts to continue to chat with down the road.

Posted: Mar 2nd 2012 7:04AM avidlurker said

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In a way this article touches on another subject:

Should a guild ever move from one game to another as an entity?

If you form and successfully lead a guild in a game recruited from players you found in that game, you have something in common: that game you were playing and presumably liked.

Will you ever get the same common ground in a game that is sufficiently different to warrant a move to it?

Or should you rather stick to the idea that a guild is part of the particular game it was founded it?

The most obvious advantage of starting a game in a preformed group is one of starting strong in that game. That argument alone without additional bonds that keeps players together strikes me as rather utilitarian though.

The idea of large gaming communities, some of which can easily encompass hundreds or even thousands of players is fairly alien to me.
You can't possibly know them all, a lot of them you'll not even like.
Yet they will probably be entitled to joining your particular sub group in the game you are playing, due to being a member in the gaming community.

Thinking about it, I think the only really honest thing to do is build up a guild in game after starting playing it and probably keeping that guild to that game unless you reach a great consensus about moving to a different one (and ideally from people taking up that game and individually liking it, then reforming the guild there).

Posted: Mar 2nd 2012 7:11AM avidlurker said

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@avidlurker
Addendum:
The obvious exception to my last statement would be a game shutting down on a guild with strong personal bonds.

In that case a collective move is probably in order, but I'd hate to in the guild leader or an officers shoes for that one. ;-)
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Posted: Mar 2nd 2012 9:01AM Dynty said

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@avidlurker man...games come and go,thats the fact. If you like to make completely new frineds twice per year,or even once per year,yes you can.
Otherwise,there is nothing "alien" on gaming community.
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Posted: Mar 2nd 2012 10:08AM Dunraven said

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Ninety percent of guilds are made by those that have no clue how to run or even be a part of one...that is why it was so damn silly of Bioware to put that much emphasis on guilds in a story based casual MMO just like it is damn silly of them to keep wasting time trying to play to the hardcore progression raiders and PVPers.

That isn't your audience and it never will be yet you still have a huge population even without the so called traditional MMO players.

Posted: Mar 2nd 2012 2:03PM Deliverator said

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@Dunraven
It was probably a business decision - it looked really, really good to investors to have 78.000 guilds - the social groups that keep people playing even when the game sucks - ready to hit the ground running at launch.
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Posted: Mar 6th 2012 8:15PM Zandog said

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Question:
What about moving servers or servers transfers? SWTOR in this case. At over 100 members recruited, our guild could only maintain 5-15 people online at any given time, even with organized group activities and level guiding lower lvl players, it became a waste of leadership scheduling when no one was on. This was a trend that was apparent across our low pop server. People either quit, or rerolled on other servers. We finally decided to switch servers, which made members unhappy because they can't transfer their characters for another 2 months starting over, wasn't appealing. We felt starting over on a high populated server was the right thing to do considering all the options. It's my belief Bioware should offer the first character transfers for free because of the miscue in their belief the servers would fill.

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