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Reader Comments (13)

Posted: Jan 22nd 2012 4:21PM Poordevil said

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SWTOR gobbled up 200 or 500 million, what can MIT do with a paltry 3 mil?

Posted: Jan 22nd 2012 4:37PM BigAndShiny said

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@Poordevil
Yeah but when you know you have a huge budget at the start of a project you usually waste a lot because you don't think you'll ever have money issues. (I've seen it happen)
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Posted: Jan 22nd 2012 4:50PM Vgk said

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@BigAndShiny Ya you do become a bit wasteful when you know you have a big budget at the start, but there's a difference between being wasteful and throwing away $197+ million
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Posted: Jan 22nd 2012 6:38PM bobfish said

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@Poordevil

Some crappy browser game, not a real MMO.
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Posted: Jan 22nd 2012 6:42PM Poordevil said

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@Poordevil

Yea I was making a joke mostly :) Really though, what kid is going to sit down and play this thing? It helps Bill and Linda feel good, and it will keep some MIT peeps employed. So it's all good!
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Posted: Jan 22nd 2012 4:56PM Saker said

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Gaming is a very smart way to teach a lot of things. A smart sane educational system for the modern world would be computer and internet based. The time for the system "as it is" is long past. It was originally designed to indoctrinate people for factory work at the beginning of the industrial revolution for gods sake! It hasn't changed much since. Time to evolve!

Posted: Jan 23rd 2012 5:39PM Vandal said

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@Saker Agreed. If they can really incorporate the learning process into a game then this idea has merit. They just have to remember that it does need to be engaging.

An MMO like this would have the benefit of bringing people with similar interests (chemistry, robotics, biology) together regardless of how far-apart they might be in the real-world. Collaboration is an important part of science but more importantly it can help encourage those bright, inventive kids who are often ostracized in school because of their intelligence. Knowing there are others out there who share your interest is the best way to keep that interest alive.
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Posted: Jan 22nd 2012 5:39PM J45neoboy said

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If I had the money, I would definitely give another 15 million and if I had the power, make it something that's required to use in school. Educational Gaming, if done the right way, is a powerful tool that teaches the student a lot more then traditional textbooks.

Posted: Jan 22nd 2012 5:56PM WesleyCrusherSweater said

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Posted: Jan 22nd 2012 5:59PM MetaReal said

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"""
That's when it hit her: The kids were practicing science.
They were using the scientific method. They'd think of a hypothesis -- This boss is really susceptible to fire spells -- and then collect evidence to see if the hypothesis was correct. If it wasn't, they'd improve it until it accounted for the observed data.
This led Steinkuehler to a fascinating and provocative conclusion: Videogames are becoming the new hotbed of scientific thinking for kids today.
This makes sense if you think about it for a second. After all, what is science? It's a technique for uncovering the hidden rules that govern the world. And videogames are simulated worlds that kids are constantly trying to master. Lineage and World of Warcraft aren't "real" world, of course, but they are consistent -- the behavior of the environment and the creatures in it are governed by hidden and generally unchanging rules, encoded by the game designers. In the process of learning a game, gamers try to deduce those rules.
This leads them, without them even realizing it, to the scientific method.
"""
From this study:
http://www.wired.com/gaming/gamingreviews/commentary/games/2008/09/gamesfrontiers_0908

Unfortunately current MMORPG do everything to punish experimentation and learning (increasing cost on respects for example to encourage you to copy/paste the best solutions instead of experimenting).

I'll have to look at this project, the MIT have a long tradition and understanding of technological impact on kids (http://llk.media.mit.edu/ Logo, Scratch, Mindstorms robotics, etc)

The funding seems Ok to me, ask Notch (Minecraft). It seems the more you have money, the less incentive you have to be innovative to really come with something new and powerful.

Posted: Jan 22nd 2012 7:58PM (Unverified) said

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Good news to see after reading about that educational minecraft server. People underestimate the potential in educational gaming. I hope this bring some light to the subject.

Posted: Jan 23rd 2012 12:55AM Graill440 said

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They are not developers with attitudes like they knowitall, 3 mill may be quite alot in their hands.


Bill?!.......Bill!!!........We need you to finance an MMO...........

Posted: Jan 23rd 2012 11:28AM Zantom said

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I was thinking about an idea like this, an educational MMO, just recently. Why not have a complex crafting system that involves real chemistry and math? There is a lot that can be done with an idea like this.

I would play and I'm 30 something...

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