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Reader Comments (88)

Posted: Jan 10th 2012 2:08PM (Unverified) said

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America is North (including Canada/Alaska) Central, South and the Caribbean. Thats America, as in the American Continent. So in other words, everybody living in the American Continent is American regardless of country, nationality, ethnicity.

The U.S. is NOT America. And yes this legislation must not pass.

Thank you.

Posted: Jan 10th 2012 3:02PM Space Cobra said

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@(Unverified)

I think you are mixing your apples with oranges here.

I understand most of your message, but it is jumbled a bit.

Most folks in the "United States" tend to label themselves, "American", but "America" is more than "North America", it includes Central and South Americas. I know this does bug people on the other parts of the continent when United States citizens just consider themselves as "Americans".
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Posted: Jan 10th 2012 2:19PM Joshinu said

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Everyone can write their congress person and express their feelings on the matter. I did and I received an email back from my congressman Jay Inslee (I live in Washington).

Here is a little section from his message:

"I believe it is crucial to give the power of choice to consumers by requiring broadband providers to keep the gateways of information flowing freely. As such, I have consistently voted to keep the Internet free from interference, including becoming an original cosponsor of H.R. 3458, the Internet Freedom Preservation Act of 2009."

One state down, 49 to go...

Posted: Jan 10th 2012 3:19PM potion said

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Scrubbing DNS entries is an exercise in futility. Not, as was suggested earlier, that IP addresses could be used instead, but because it's a simple matter to create an alternate DNS structure using the same underlying IP addressing system. This was done with the SuperRoot project a number of years ago (Google "superroot alternate dns" if you want to learn more), and many others too. Add some VPN technology and I would not be surprised if many undetectable Undernets (Underworld-Internets) already exist.

My point here is that targeting the Internet and its technology in order to crack down on illicit activities is like tearing up a section of highway because some folk speed on it. It will inconvenience everyone, and the speedsters will simply find another route or find something else illegal to do with their cars.

Posted: Jan 10th 2012 3:24PM potion said

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@potion *** I thought that I just invented "Undernet" but have just found that the term has already been coined an applied to and IRC network. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Undernet ... Apologies.
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Posted: Jan 10th 2012 3:42PM Lenn said

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@potion How about Shadownet?
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Posted: Jan 10th 2012 6:02PM (Unverified) said

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@potion : I don't think you can wave this away as "an exercise in futility" just because there are ways for savvy people to work around the problem.

I remember piracy back in the day. In the 80's, it was trading copied tapes and disks hand to hand. If you wanted a copy of something, you needed to personally know someone who had it. Sure we had "don't copy that floppy!" and "home taping is killing music!" panics, but piracy was really not any sort of mass production.

In the 90's, warez were traded on BBSes. And good stuff (new releases) was not freely available to the public. You needed an account on a good warez BBS (often personal recommendation was required), and you needed to maintain an upload:download ratio. Casuals were locked out.

But since the explosion of P2P, casuals are NOT locked out of piracy. People who are completely technically clueless can get movies, games, music, TV shows, etc. with absolute ease. There is NO barrier to entry any more. And THAT is what the industries are trying to fight. Do they care that people who know what they're doing will set up undernets? No. They'd rather they didn't, of course, but if they could squeeze the casuals out of pirating with impunity, that would be the big win.
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Posted: Jan 11th 2012 12:42AM Protoavis said

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@(Unverified)

Lets be honest as soon as p2p get tackled legally everyone will be using usenet which then makes the anti pirate folks job harder. Add into that the people helping these pirate networks along will ultimately want the average job in their, since stupid suzy is more likely to be the fall guy than they are.
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Posted: Jan 10th 2012 3:27PM Lateris said

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When Americans wake up it will be too late as you will have to refer to your President as Chairman or Chancellor.

Posted: Jan 10th 2012 5:08PM Daeths said

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Fortunately id do have hope that if it passes the first sign of an trouble and a massive suit will be brought in federal courts where it will then quickly be kicked up to the SC and all of SOPAs provisions will be put on hold till a rule is reached. Or at least I really hope so

Posted: Jan 10th 2012 5:27PM Daeths said

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@Daeths (Really need an edit to fix my spelling...)

Also, as much as i think many of his positions are down right cooky (gold standard, dissolving the Feds and IRS and ruining the Dept. of Edu.) Stuff like this make me want to vote in a true libertarian like Ron Paul. I would never do it, because i don't believe hell be able too keep out as much as he says he would, but i am tempted from time to time.
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Posted: Jan 10th 2012 6:03PM (Unverified) said

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@Daeths : Ron Paul, a true libertarian? Don't make me laugh.

Here's a simple Ron Paul flowchart.

Does a federal law infringe on a liberty that Ron Paul personally approve of? OPPOSE IT.

Does a federal law infringe on a liberty that Ron Paul does NOT personally approve of (e.g. the right to a safe and legal abortion)? IT'S THE STATES' BUSINESS, LET THEM OUTLAW IT, I DON'T CARE.
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Posted: Jan 10th 2012 5:21PM Skyydragonn said

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While I fear SOPA will push the USA further towards being a corporate controled dicotomy and less a land of free people's governed by free peoples. the bit from that video "maybe we should ask some nerds what this stuff does." is F-in hilarious.

Posted: Jan 10th 2012 5:26PM Skyydragonn said

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I am Both a paying customer of the music/movie and gaming industries I am also what i refer to as a "protest pirate"

I see three things coming from this bill.

1) Corporate controlled internet for the US (China anyone?)

2) increased "fees' for consumers to pay all of the new employess this bill will require to support it (more corp BS)

3) Zero impact in online piracy.

Posted: Jan 10th 2012 5:29PM Ryn said

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Brilliant article as always by Brendan.

SOPA will be the end of freedom as we know it. So much of what we share now goes through the web.

Every politician who signs on to this bill should be charged with treason. There is no way around it. The first video proves the point. These people at the hearing, and one is Rep. John Conyers from Detroit, 80 yrs old and probably never powered up a computer, never mind his wife is in jail for accepting bribes while president of Detroit city council. These people are passing bills about things they dont begin to understand. That is why we are in the mess we are today.

But in the end, Obama will sign this bill if it gets to his desk. This is his way of things after all. Government knows best, just ask him...and his cronies.

We are all just along for the ride in Obamas America.

Hey, maybe they need a Mascot to sell this thing? Obama could have Johnny Depp dress up as the Mad Hatter...Just a thought....

Posted: Jan 10th 2012 6:04PM Utakata said

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Just off a side...

...I know that Anonymous has a controversial history here when it comes to their version of activism. And I understand that. We don't like it when they direct their fury at our games. But sadly SOPA is proving that they are very necessary. Because the US/international governments and multi-nationals aren't going to protect our interests....someone else has too.

Posted: Jan 10th 2012 7:04PM (Unverified) said

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The usual response from the SOPA supporters is that detractors' examples of how it could be abused are ridiculous and exaggerated. Sure, there's wiggle room in the bill, but there's no way that heartless, money-hungry corporations would dare to squeeze through loopholes in order to destroy competition and force customers to pay more! That's preposterous!

As if the more stable and reasonable DMCA isn't already abused constantly...

Posted: Jan 10th 2012 7:07PM Graill440 said

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In a couple years (several possibly), the security will be so advanced that onlne piracy will not be an issue. Some of the things in the works would boggle the minds of many of you. Those that know and have done the research know of what i am typing about, those that do not and are to lazy to research, well you just keep DL those files. Laugh.

Posted: Jan 10th 2012 7:48PM Utakata said

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@Graill440

Would you care to enlighten us on this "research" instead of giving us a load of vague cryptic "ooo...scary warnings"? This is not a Tom Clancy novel. This is reality about how we will be able to use the internet in the future...so we would like to know.

Anything less than the requested cited research then your just trolling.
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Posted: Jan 10th 2012 8:18PM Wisdomandlore said

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SOPA is a travesty, but it was a travesty when the government let the broadband industry poison the Internet Freedom act.

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