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Reader Comments (88)

Posted: Jan 10th 2012 11:55AM bobfish said

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@Scuffles

This is the thing, the only part of SOPA that is similar to China's enforcement/policing of the internet is the DNS removal system. The rest is ridiculous.

I personally couldn't care less about what the US government decides to do within it's own borders, but unfortunately they do control global domain names such as .com .net etc, so they could make life hard for non-US companies and citizens if they wanted.

DNS removal in and of itself isn't a big deal, they have no control over DNS outside of those physically located within the US.
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Posted: Jan 10th 2012 12:15PM Floop the Squirrel said

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@bobfish

Tell that to Spain...

And any other country the US can freely and openly blackmail.

If SOPA and PIPA pass, they should start thinking of changing "we the people" to "we the corporations" ... because let's face it.. the big corporations are all that matters.
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Posted: Jan 10th 2012 12:43PM fallwind said

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@Floop the Squirrel

legally, corporations are already people....
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Posted: Jan 10th 2012 1:24PM Space Cobra said

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@fallwind

What was it that Dr. Seuss said in "Horton Hears a Who" and "that other book about one group of people who kept elevating themselves above another group of people with the help of a salesman?

Something about, "All people are equal, but some people are more equal than others?"
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Posted: Jan 10th 2012 2:21PM Ref Minor said

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@Space Cobra

That was George Orwell in the book Animal Farm, a allegory of communism, written in the 1940's
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Posted: Jan 10th 2012 2:57PM Space Cobra said

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@Ref Minor

Well, I don't mean to imply communism/socialism here, just "some classes of people are better than others".

Strange how this has worked out BOTH in Soviet Russian and the United States. Some people take advantage of their power/situation via money/friends/position and give themselves better conditions while telling others that they should "tow the line" and sending in scare tactics to get their policies passed.
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Posted: Jan 10th 2012 3:02PM Borick said

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@Ref Minor I don't think Orwell, Huxley, or the current Powers That Be (TM) foresaw the Internet.

The idea that such control could be used is insanity. It will backfire upon those who seek to implement it. I pray that we can mitigate the suffering that will be caused by these attempts to pervert natural law.

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Posted: Jan 10th 2012 5:18PM Daeths said

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@fallwind well, people with more rights and much less liability any ways
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Posted: Jan 11th 2012 10:33AM Cyroselle said

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@Scuffles With this, NDAA, PIPA and the extension of the Patriot Act, I feel like I'm living in a waking nightmare over what my country is becoming.

I'm not sitting idly just watching this all happen however, I'm advocating like hell to get people informed on it. I don't know if we can change the minds of the legislature, but people at least deserve to know about the screwing they are about to receive.
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Posted: Jan 10th 2012 11:41AM DarkWalker said

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The best way to make sure people purchase games (and other kinds of content), instead of pirating it, is to offer people good products at a reasonable price. Steam (and other digital distribution systems like GOG), by offering games at fair prices with instant digital delivery (and, i the case of GOG, with great extras and no DRM), has IMHO done more to combat piracy than any DRM or piece of legislation.

On the other hand, every time I see a pirate version of a game that is actually better than what can be obtained legally, I keep imagining how the publisher could be so braindead to let his product be actually worse than the illegal competitor; when the incentive to pirate is not just financial, but also a product quality one, something is very wrong. This can happen, for example, when the pirate version incorporates extras from limited editions (and more so when the extras are mutually exclusive, such as when each store offers a different extra), when it disables some DRM mechanism that is problematic for legitimate users (such as that blasted Ubisoft DRM that requires constant connection - main reason I didn't purchase the new Prince of Persia games), etc.

Posted: Jan 10th 2012 12:20PM Floop the Squirrel said

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@DarkWalker

I agree.. Ubisoft are a great example of how you can alienate paying customers and make the original game be a huge pain in the ass compared to the pirated copy.

I can remember when they announced Anno 1404 with that retarded 3-installs only DRM thing, i decided not to buy that. And many others did too.


On the other hand Steam and GOG are brilliant. Steam actually converted an immense number of former pirates by offering games at sane prices.
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Posted: Jan 11th 2012 12:12AM Protoavis said

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@Floop the Squirrel

and the anno 1404 drm didn't work at all, so they one up themselves with anno 2070 to basically needing to be online while playing to get access to important parts of the game . (meanwhile I don't think the game is better than 1404, its basically a reskin with a lot of new boring features that weigh down the gameplay)
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Posted: Jan 11th 2012 3:30AM Floop the Squirrel said

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@Protoavis

I didn't even think about the "lovely" DRM in the new one (because i dislike the setting, so i didn't pay it much attention anyway)

Anyway, to get back on topic.. Ubisoft really prove Gabe Newell's point about the service problem. Many people choose to pirate Ubisoft games just because of the intrusive DRM that's basically sodomizing paying customers.

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Posted: Jan 10th 2012 11:55AM hami83 said

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It's funny how what is considered the most important issue in the US right now, the economy, no one is talking about the financial disaster that this will create.

Not only will many small people and businesses not be able to sell and make money within the states, but almost all major companies will move all of their servers and infrastructure outside of the states taking jobs away.

Ad revenue will plummet as companies will just not bother advertising if they fear the treat of being delisted.

Digital revenue (which some states tax) will plummet is many sites are taken down because of this.

Jobs lost, money lost, companies moving outside the country, piracy will most likely increase as friends try to convince other friends to fight these companies that support it.

The Internet will almost become an ironic joke when news sites like Fox and NBC, and even politicians talk about "The American way" and freedom for Americans and talking about "Communist" evil countries.

I honestly wouldn't be surprised, if this passes, if some Americans revoke their citizenship and leave the country.

Note: I am Canadian, and while we don't have any laws like this, I wouldn't be surprised if we do eventually as our government is just as corrupt as the American one.

Posted: Jan 10th 2012 12:16PM Ceridith said

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@hami83
That's what's so scary about SOPA and PIPA, the Canadian government doesn't have to pass anything remotely like these bills to be effected by draconian Internet censorship. SOPA and PIPA will give the US government authority to hijack the domain of accused "rogue" websites, both inside and outside the US.
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Posted: Jan 10th 2012 1:19PM ElfLove said

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@hami83

Also a Canadian here, and I'm sure that we'll make a copy of that law, if not bow down to these laws due to our current governments need to make us 'the little USA'.

it's really a scar time that we live in, with the rise of anti-intellectualism, and reality TV starting to mirror actual reality in some peoples lives....we need help, lots of help. >_<

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Posted: Jan 10th 2012 11:57AM Darkkhorse said

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Just another way for large corporations to cut out competition. This will also be used to shut down alternate news sources, which have become quite an annoyance to the corporately owned news agencies that are constantly caught lying and manufacturing propaganda pieces to sway the masses. Gamers, civil-libertarians, freedom lovers and humans in general should oppose SOPA, it's moving us closer to a fascist state.

Posted: Jan 10th 2012 11:57AM Seffrid said

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Out of interest, is there any formal counter-proposal detailed anywhere that shows what the organised opponents of SOPA would consider a reasonable way of providing the benefits of such an Act without incurring its disadvantages? Or are they saying that the present situation is ok and that no futher action is necessary?

Also, what's the situation with PIPA? It got mentioned in the same sentence as SOPA in the opening paragraph of the article but never got mentioned again. What's that one about?

Posted: Jan 10th 2012 1:22PM Joaquin Crowe said

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@Seffrid Trying to pawn off a "where's your solution then?" on those opposed is b.s. and lazy. If the RIAA and the rogue's gallery of other SOPA supporters have a problem, they're the one who have to figure out a solution that won't piss people off. Or, better yet, stop trying to buy congress and use (and not abuse as they have been doing) existing laws, instead of writing horrible legislation.
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Posted: Jan 10th 2012 1:50PM Seffrid said

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@Joaquin Crowe

Actually, all the supporters have to do is get the Bill passed. Their chance of doing so is much diminished if the opponents of the Bill are able to come up with something better.

All I asked for is an indication of whether the organised opponents are saying no action is necessary or whether they have an alternative proposal that would secure any benefits of the Bill without incurring its disadvantages?

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