| Mail |
You might also like: WoW Insider, Joystiq, and more

Reader Comments (7)

Posted: Jan 10th 2012 7:39PM Joaquin Crowe said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
Lucasarts used to be so cool. I miss them.

Posted: Jan 10th 2012 8:20PM BIGGIN said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
I remember reading an article previewing this game in a C64 mag back when I was a kid, but I never came across anything else about it.

Posted: Jan 10th 2012 8:58PM Deliverator said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
Your article prompted me to call my Dad - turns out he still has my C64, the Okimate 10 heat transfer printer (Full Color!) , 5 1/4 floppy and everything else in a box along with my TI-99 4a and it's cassette tape drive. Oh, the memories! It reminded me of a time before EA became evil - just a little company called Electronic Arts that released my favorite game - Archon!

I spent countless hours on that stuff, usually writing D&D character generators and simple little question and answer games. I think I was in 6th grade when the TI came out - we were in the process of learning Apple BASIC in school. Every time we'd complete a learning module and produced a working program we got to play a game. My favs on the Apple were Castle Wolfenstein and Lode Runner. Lode Runner used to let you create your own levels and trade them via floppy. My claim to fame at the time was a board I made based around a giant VH - Van Halen!
/end boring reminiscing.

I never got a chance to play with Habitat, but a friends Dad worked for IBM and showed me my first modem - of the acoustic coupler type that you had to velcro your phone's handset to. How far we've come!

Posted: Jan 10th 2012 9:23PM jimr9999us said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
Nice work going back in time for this one...I remember spending an entire afternoon with a buddy learning enough enough BASIC on the C64 to move a blue square around the screen.

So I joined a rock band instead. I'm no wiser now.

Thanks Justin :)

Posted: Jan 11th 2012 12:50PM Masync9 said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
Uh oh! Way back memory machine! : ) I had my Atari 800 - the Apple's were way too expensive for me to save up for even though I loved the IIe. The price they wanted at the time I could get a used car for lol. I had another high school buddy that had C64 for great fun and comparison. I ended up going with Atari as I figure they were the king at the arcades - good chance they will carry that over to their computers. lol turns out that the C64 fared far, far better - doh!

Being around computers, you could feel something big was going to happen. Like something that dropped down from the heavens by the Greek gods that mere mortals were not ready for hehe.

Anyway, damned War Games movie had come out and my parental units freaked out and thought at any moment I would wreak havoc. Living in a rural area we did not have a dedicated phone line - we had a party line - shared phone line : (

So puling some cash together I purchased though the mail a 300baud modem that hooked to one of my joystick ports. Waiting til 2am - I remember the first time hearing those tones then seeing remote data transfer being drawn on my screen - my first connection to a BBS. Wow.

How things have changed - mostly for the better overall. I do miss those days, the din of the arcade music , the money saved up and then being gobbled up by so many wonderful arcade machines, computer swap meetings, cutting the corner of your 5.25 so you can use the other side of the floppy, fawning over the guy who had the super cool 3.5 disks...

It was great times, yet I would not want to give up all the progress we presently enjoy and take for granted today.

Thanks for the article - its easy to forget how quickly we have changed in such a short amount of time.

Posted: Jan 11th 2012 1:46PM Space Cobra said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
Damn lots of reminiscing...

(Atari ruled!) ;P


Anyway....

I was very young but curious about all this. Seeing "Habitat" did ring some mental bells, but I think I may've read about it more than anything. The hourly fee was normal back then. This sort of fills in one piece of a puzzle I am a bit too lazy to research for now. I did not know QuantumLink was for C-64 (I guess I wouldn't, since I was an Atari person and eventually went to Apple IIe all at once). I am sure QuantumLink became AOL (or was absorbed by AOL?). So, there fits that piece of the puzzle. Really, by the time I got to AOL, it was AOL and it was on a Mac (then later a PC).

It's interesting that they show these "grown up" folks spending time on this. A lawyer at a "big firm" (since his last name is part of the firm's name), a newspaper editor, and more. I guess they were still feeling things out; what groups would be attracted to which "online diversions". IMO, this somewhat worked out, but of course, it attracted more younger folks, those around college age and younger. There were adults doing these things, but not spending the masses of hours. Well, there were exceptions, but that is another topic of discussion I won't touch upon.

I think just before this, the common perception was that they marketed computers to "adults" and businesses because it could perform accounting as well as a CPA along with other work-related things. Then came a study that said while most people stated on surveys they bought computers for "work" or even "education", most people mostly played games on them, which was really no surprise, given the amount of games and game companies out already. Even then, "adults" reluctantly admitted to having 1-2 games that they would play for a short while, because their computer really was for "work". ;p

But these "games" and even "social media" of that time, such as chat rooms did flourish. I should also think many of us convinced our parents to buy such things and sorta secretly used them for game playing.

Things are really different now and not in how one may view it. Sure, there is WoW, but "chatting" in chat rooms, while it is still there, has fallen out of popularity (it seems). Much like the "insta-travel" complaints of MMOs, instant messaging has made chat rooms sorta null-and-void. Mix that in with there are so many chat rooms, all pretty much free to use and bring up the analogy of "limited local free channels of yesteryear vs. Cable/Satellite TV today with numerous channels" and you kinda get an idea.

In some ways, it was easier to maintain and be on top of news, especially gaming news, back then. Sure, things did get launched unnannounced and you had to wait on print, but everything was in one place and there wasn't *much* of new things coming out; it was easy to keep tabs on. Now, new games and social-things come out regularly. You get such choices.... If there were little choice, I'd probably be all over something like IMVU now (or Vzones) and I wouldn't be alone.

Things are definitely more "main-stream" and readily accessible. People can get picky over there choices of online venues now. It is pretty enlightening if you "connect-the-dots" and figure out how/why things were instead of wearing the rosy shades of nostalgia all the time. Nothing wrong with that, but you have to account for realities of the situation you were in. Ignore the "endless summer of childhood", because it wasn't *that* endless. ;)

Posted: Jan 11th 2012 2:57PM runzwithsizzorz said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
"The internet saturates so much of our lives now that it's even difficult for those of us born prior to the '90s to remember how we functioned without smartphones..."

I function without ANY cellphone thank you very much. Just as I did when I was a kid. But I am glad that we no longer have to hide our touch-tone phones from Ma Bell anymore because the technician on the pole no longer detected our rented rotary phone.

Good times.

Featured Stories

Engadget

Engadget

Joystiq

Joystiq

WoW Insider

WoW

TUAW

TUAW