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Reader Comments (120)

Posted: Dec 30th 2011 8:29PM Deliverator said

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@Skyydragonn
Before you step in it, The Constitution only gives us the right to address our grievances through voting, writing our senators, etc. I believe what you're referring to is in the Declaration of Independence.

I agree with the spirit of your point though and I just thought I'd point out that minor reference mix up before someone tried to use it to invalidate your whole thought.
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Posted: Dec 30th 2011 5:50PM Yukon Sam said

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SOPA is an unconstitutional swill that our so-called representatives hope they can pour down our throats unnoticed while the body politic lies in an apathetic coma.

I support any and all attempts by Anonymous to take out Congress, and...

What's that? Sony? They're not going after those anti-American traitors on the Hill that are bent on selling us out for campaign cash? What the hell good do they think it'll do to go after a gaming company?

Whatever.

Posted: Dec 30th 2011 5:57PM Lenn said

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@Yukon Sam "What the hell good do they think it'll do to go after a gaming company?"

Anything for the lulz.
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Posted: Dec 30th 2011 6:06PM Yukon Sam said

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@Lenn

It'd be a bigger lulz to bring those Kochsuckers in Congress to their knees. But I guess Anonymous doesn't have the talent for that grade of hack.
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Posted: Dec 30th 2011 7:26PM Deliverator said

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@Yukon Sam
unless by bringing them to their knees you meant killing their precious bill. Congress is just bringing the papers in that they're told to. What are they going to do, shut off their email?
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Posted: Dec 30th 2011 7:39PM Lenn said

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@Deliverator If they can hold an entertainment company hostage, they can hold a government organization hostage. Unless they're too afraid, or there aren't many "lulz" to be gained from doing that.
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Posted: Dec 30th 2011 7:52PM Deliverator said

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@Lenn
your 'if then' statement is a logical fallacy
If I can drive in a game then I can drive a dumptruck.
Care to qualify? How are they similar? Are there differences between the way a corporation operates and congress operates? Methinks so.
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Posted: Dec 30th 2011 8:04PM Lenn said

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@Deliverator Goverment websites have been shown, time and again, to be just as full of holes as your average game company's. I'm sure a dedicated vigilante hacker would have no trouble with it. Unless they weren't all that dedicated to begin with and the "lulz" are far more important than the justice.
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Posted: Dec 30th 2011 8:14PM Deliverator said

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@Lenn
Fallacy of misdirection
We're not talking about websites here, we're talking about bringing them to their knees operationally. Congress just found out about the internet in '08. Cutting off our ability to see what they're doing doesn't stop them funding themselves through your pay check. Cutting off our ability to 'see what Sony's doing' (play) hits their bottom line.
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Posted: Dec 30th 2011 6:09PM smartstep said

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Not only SOPA there is second bill trying to be passed at same time - called Protect IP.

It is as BAD as SOPA.

So beware, goverment might try to pass Protect IP under smoke screen of SOPA.

Posted: Dec 31st 2011 12:57AM Cyroselle said

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@smartstep

I could be wrong, but I believe P.R.O.T.E.C.T. I.P. ( AKA 'Preventing Real Online Threats to Economic Creativity and Theft of Intellectual Property'... yes, it's all really an acronym, the US government really has a 'thing' for them) has already been effectively killed.

The cynic in me kind of delights in the irony in these names. Bills that aim to squash freedom being called 'liberty ', and motions that will destroy avenues for creative individuals being labeled as promoting or protecting creativity. /right/.
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Posted: Dec 30th 2011 6:14PM Lenn said

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"SOPA opposers worry that the bill will infringe on First Amendment rights and permanently harm the internet"

That, or they worry they won't be able to share illegal copies of someone else's intellectual property anymore.

But even if they're somehow "just" in their beliefs, this is the problem I have with initiatives like this: they're not going after the people who proposed the bill and who can get it to pass, and doing so in a legal way (through the political system), but they're going after companies who support that bill, and consequently after the customers of said companies. Not only will they not be making friends this way with the people who might be most easily swayed to their side, they also lose all credibility.

Using words like "lulzmas" isn't helping either. Lulzmas? Really?

Posted: Dec 30th 2011 8:19PM Skyydragonn said

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@Lenn
the problem again is Citizens vs, Corporation.

Corporation ahd been around for years, has developed dedicated legal/PR/Finance teams devoted to this stuff. Civilians have brand new ragtag group of likeminded individuals with a sorgasboard of random education and skillsets devoted to any one of a hudred things. Who do you think is more prepared/capabale of winning a legal battle of this sort?

Sometimes the only option is to take to the streets, set a trashcan on fire and scream your dissent in thier faces before they take notice.
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Posted: Dec 30th 2011 6:18PM SKYeXile said

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These guys need to all die in a fire, seriously.

Posted: Dec 30th 2011 6:30PM axler said

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the amount of people here who have no idea what anonymous or SOPA is is incredible. You do realize that facebook, google, youtube, and a lot of other popular sites will no longer be able to function if SOPA is passed? Well at least in the USA. They will of course still be able to do business outside of the US, but that would mean the US would practically cut itself off the free internet as we know it and become more like china. Is that what you want? I for one don't want to see half of my gaming buddies disappear over night...

As to the lovely wikileaks comment. Educate yourself on how the internet works. Then when you are in shock about the centralised DNS system and how the USA has control of the main DNS server and refused to let it be managed by the UN, allow me to tell you that whatever agency responsible has actually taken wikileaks (during the scandal) out of the DNS. Meaning people who would try to access it by its domain name could no longer get there by either typing in the IP directly or using google's DNS server, who did not remove it from their server. This is of course censure in its purest form and is of course in complete violation of many of the rights of the US citizens.
But to get to the source. People in leadership positions screwed up badly, so someone made it public, for the world to see. Instead of getting mad at the people in leadership positions who screwed up everyone got mad at the dude who made public.
Free speech and many of the liberties we once had have indeed fallen to a new low...

Posted: Dec 30th 2011 6:38PM Lenn said

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@axler "This is of course censure in its purest form and is of course in complete violation of many of the rights of the US citizens."

Tell your elected officials. If they don't act, kick them out. It's their job to listen to the people who put them in office and act on their behalf. If your political system is so corrupted that democracy is now a four-letter word, do something about it, for f's sake.

Anonymous is going after the wrong people. They will not be taken seriously. This will make some headlines for a few weeks and then people will forget about it.

Or do nothing and let those guys hack Sony and Justin Bieber and Lady Gaga. Hell, if they can manage to shut up the latter two, I'm not complaining.
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Posted: Dec 30th 2011 7:30PM Deliverator said

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@axler
if you're referring to my wikileaks comment, what I was saying is that I think SOPA is a response to the frustration the US had with not being able to take down the site. Under SOPA it would have been a cakewalk.
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Posted: Dec 30th 2011 7:32PM Deliverator said

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@axler

Or more to your point, couldn't they use SOPA to force Google to remove the DNS entry for Wikileaks?
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Posted: Dec 30th 2011 6:52PM Space Cobra said

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Also, in a related article that Anon probably should read:

http://www.joystiq.com/2011/12/30/nintendo-ea-and-sony-also-rescind-sopa-support/

Posted: Dec 30th 2011 7:32PM ElfLove said

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@Space Cobra

I hope this means they wont attacks them now... o_O

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