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Reader Comments (5)

Posted: Dec 27th 2011 8:48PM Malaman said

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Hey Jef, we have a lot of games out there, but, how many of them are good to play? maybe 2 or 3. Hope you are wrong and 2012 comes with real MMO's.

Posted: Dec 27th 2011 10:20PM Space Cobra said

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@Malaman

The thing is that not everyone has a discerning palate: You get people that go to all-you-can eat buffets and you have others that prefer finer dining...and those in between.

Heck, I'd like to try out many games, but either I have or haven't (and there are still many I haven't) because of time-constraints. Also, we are gamers and can be discerning. Many players are not.

As much as I didn't like one guys view, MMOs really need to be marketed a different way, more akin to console games (which, admittedly, are not even marketed that well; IMO, you have to be a fan of the genre to really know/expect certain games than the average person).
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Posted: Dec 27th 2011 9:17PM Saucelah said

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@(Unverified)

It would be, wouldn't it, because it's not an analogy.

Posted: Dec 28th 2011 3:38AM Seffrid said

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I think the key to Jef's rather depressing prediction (which I don't disagree with) is his comment about there not being enough paying gamers.

As the market thins out, two things will mark out those games which stand out as market leaders and survivors - quality, and subscription options.

Games may increasingly move towards the fremium business model, that is to say a combination of cash shop and subscription, but apart from the typical Korean-type cutesy PK grindfest clones which will continue to breed like rabbits, the mainstream Western MMOs will move away from the pure F2P model and move more towards subscriptions complemented by cash shops.

As that happens, the freeloaders will move away from the mainstream games towards the Korean and browser-based markets and the better of the mainstream games will be bolstered by those willing to play to pay them. The MMO genre will emerge the better for such a transition.

Posted: Dec 28th 2011 3:45AM Dblade said

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I agree with you. 2011 was the year of indie failure, 2012 will be the year of F2P failure.

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