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Reader Comments (309)

Posted: Nov 23rd 2011 12:54PM Critical Mass said

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@jslim419

Never heard of the name Richard Garriott before to be honest, but will entertain myself by looking it up on the internet. I live in Scandinavia btw, not at all being some geographical area where people tend to be given the name Richard.
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Posted: Nov 23rd 2011 3:10PM (Unverified) said

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@Critical Mass

Wow.... I'm not trying to be mean here, but did you google translate that from another language or something? If so, I'm sorry, but you should really stop. Your post reads like someone who just picked up a thesaurus and cobbled together a bunch of big words in ways that ALMOST make sense.

Seriously, the only coherent thought I was able to extract from that was that you apparently think "Fantasy Game" means "a game in which to live out your fantasies, unbound." and that the bounds of modern gaming technology are unacceptable for such a game. First of all, that's ridiculous. You call out Skyrim, which in many reviews has been called a "fantasy life simulator." That is perhaps hyperbole, but it's pretty damned close. If you don't think you have enough freedom and options in Skyrim, quit playing games and come back in 30 years. Obviously you aren't looking for enjoyment in the right places for modern games, and we don't have the technology to do what you seem to want.

That's beside the point however, because that is NOT what "fantasy" game means. That is why the person above pointed out that "Role Playing Game" is closer to what you seem to be looking for. Despite your apparent distaste for the term, he is right. A "game in which to live out your fantasies" would be a role playing game.

Fantasy, as used in this context, refers to the fantasy genre. The fantasy genre is focused around swords and sorcery, although extends to cover most things with a magical / supernatural primary plot element.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fantasy
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Posted: Nov 23rd 2011 5:46PM dudemanjac said

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@Critical Mass Fantasy game means it is based in a fantasy universe. It has also come to mean swords and sorcery will be involved. That has nothing to do with any of that long list of nonsense you wrote.

It could be argued whether SWTOR is science fiction or science fantasy, but it would never be considered a straight fantasy game.
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Posted: Nov 23rd 2011 5:54PM Critical Mass said

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@(Unverified)
(My text was cut off ANEW, sigh, maybe using math signs in the text caused some formatting error somehow)

Definition of ALMOST:
Very nearly but not exactly or entirely "we're almost there"

Middle English, from Old English ealmæst, from eall + mæst most
First Known Use: before 12th century
(Merriam Webster dictionary)

"all" pluss "most" equals "almost"
"all" pluss "one" equals "alone"
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Posted: Nov 23rd 2011 6:02PM Critical Mass said

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@(Unverified)

Part I

(It seems I may have to split my comment in two pieces in order to get to include the whole comment of mine.)

Definition of ALMOST:
Very nearly but not exactly or entirely "we're almost there"

Middle English, from Old English ealmæst, from eall + mæst most
First Known Use: before 12th century
(Merriam Webster dictionary)

"all" & "most" equals "almost"
"all" & "one" equals "alone"
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Posted: Nov 23rd 2011 6:03PM Critical Mass said

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@(Unverified)

Part II (continued)

If a company were to purport to have made, or simply insist on having made a "fantasy PC game" or just "fantasy game", here simply understood as a game with a theme from some fantasy IP (intellectual property), then surely one could expect this game to rely on your faculty or interest in imagining an experience about impossible or improbably things.

I believe someone copypasted such an explanation of what probably is the common meaning of this noun "fantasy" from a dictionary just earlier today in this comment field. The interesting notion about "fantasy" as a term or even an idea, is not it being a denomination of something objectified, as a thing (as if talking about YOUR or MY fantasies, whatever that could mean), but it being a conceptual framework for the purpose of wanting to explain our conscious and perhaps unconscious engagement with reality and alternate realities. Btw, "reality" is not a thing, or a number of things. Just like with the noun "fantasy", the noun "reality" is foremost an idea or rather a human concept, usually described with language to be easily communicated and understood between people, and as such is not something normative like a certain thing or limited some strict and definitive meaning that can be said to represent real material things.

I see now that the word "fantasy" is not an adjective as I probably thought earlier ("fantastic" is an adjective though), but that small mistake is of little importance here. From the lack of any given definition of the meaning of "fantasy game", my text make more sense now than it ever did, since you cannot simply say that the meaning I elaborated upon is wrong, with regard to the discussoin at hand which is the perhaps less used term "fantasy game".

Does the proverbial "magic staff" usually run on batteries, is connected to an electric grid or being nuclear powered? Roleplaying the features of the proverbial magic staff would be a feeble and pointless attempt, if a magic staff could not already be a figment of ones imagination. Roleplaying as such, is surely not some primordial efficasy, fantasy on the other hand would be.

True, the notion of a "fantasy game" is foremost associated with the fantasy genre, these two words alone does surely not have some definitive meaning to it, but I would now have to argue, that because the fantasy genre by all standards is based on.. *drumroll* fantasy as such, there ought to be little or no difference between fantasy as genre and fantasy as an idea, and more importantly the concept of fantasy as a means to explain how a computer game relates to a gamer when associated with alternate realities you will not patently or are unlikely to find in real life.

Sure one could possibly try sitting on the back of a live grizzly bear disguised as a dwarf, having it run through the snow covered woods scaring the ones you pass on your way, but this all seem unlikely to happen, while also being fairly pointless.
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Posted: Nov 23rd 2011 6:05PM Critical Mass said

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Part I and a half >.<

(Continued from definition of "almost")

In retrospect, perhaps you sort of indented to say, hardly instead of almost?

I am happy that you have found your own associations to my elaborations on what is to be understand as a "fantasy game" ridiculous, because I never wrote, intended or otherwise conveyed such an idea which you have characterized as living out ones fantasies, whatever that could mean (context dependent). It seem obvious to me that the saying "living out ones fantasy" deals with wildly different problems than what is to be thought of as being a "fantasy". For example, it is not impossible to rob a bank or to do novel or unusual things, so such a scheme has really not something to do with being an alternate reality, other than clearly being a deed likely shunned by society at large. And to simply pretending to be other people is hardly something that one would normally associate with being a fantasy.

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Posted: Nov 23rd 2011 6:11PM Critical Mass said

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Part I and a half (sigh, continued after dictionary entry for the word almost)

Alone, this word being another fun example of how a certain word is not a result of something random.

In retrospect, perhaps you sort of indented to say, hardly instead of almost?

I am happy that you have found your own associations to my elaborations on what is to be understand as a "fantasy game" ridiculous, because I never wrote, intended or otherwise conveyed such an idea which you have characterized as living out ones fantasies, whatever that could mean (context dependent). It seem obvious to me that the saying "living out ones fantasy" deals with wildly different problems than what is to be thought of as being a "fantasy". For example, it is not impossible to rob a bank or to do novel or unusual things, so such a scheme has really not something to do with being an alternate reality, other than clearly being a deed likely shunned by society at large. And to simply pretending to be other people is hardly something that one would normally associate with being a fantasy.
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Posted: Nov 23rd 2011 7:11PM Cendres said

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@Critical Mass Hugh you wasted a lot of words on proving you don't know what you were saying. Congrats. You are in fact referring to Role playing features and mechanics as opposed to action or 'arcade' based ones as you put it, and even those two things aren't even the same thing. There's not that much arcade-like features in SWTOR, just a bit.

Fantasy is a theme. What does that have to do with anything that you're talking about? Nothing.
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Posted: Nov 23rd 2011 7:31PM Dopamin said

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@Critical Mass

Mate, please breathe for a second and read what the others answered to your posts.
They're right and your walls of text hardly make any sense.
"Fantasy" is a well known genre in any works of fiction and that definition is just common sense when talking about a video game. Are you sure you were'nt looking for the term "role playing game"?
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Posted: Nov 23rd 2011 8:22PM Critical Mass said

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@Cendres

Having a discussion with you on massively would be alot better if you at least once could form a single argument which would at least show an effort at being sincere.

So called fantasy literature, can be said to have fantasy as a theme, as opposed to other types of fiction (everything is fiction one way or another, no apriori stuff), but a fantasy setting would probably not be very compelling if a) a book was ultimately not believed to be related to fantasy in general, or b) that what one would understand as being characterized as fantasy ultimately becomes something that lends to a (oddly enough) surreal experience.

The only instance I used the word "theme" was above for making an example of how important it would be for a PC game to have a functional fantasy experience, when using a dominant idea (a particular theme, elves or whatnot) based on an existing fantasy story (like a book or movie).

It seem fair to point out that when people read fantasy literature, they are most certainly not engaging in roleplaying. If they do this, they are not being entertained by the literature, but are entertaining themselves in ways I cannot possibly imagine. It would be retarded of me to even consider an example of such a situation, where one as a reader took upon a particular role for when wanting to read fantasy literature.

I guess a goal of fantasy as such, is to achieve a suspension of disbelief. So in a pc game with shallow game mechanics, I bet there would be disbelief in bucket loads.
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Posted: Nov 23rd 2011 8:44PM Critical Mass said

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@Dopamin

I could say that, I bet you would say Santa Claus is real, simply for entertaining your notion of how you yourself find this particular name to be familiar.

There is already a guy who put up this dictionary entry (which I already mentioned), stating that this noun fantasy (a noun is foremost a noun, and not an idea nor a concept) is undersood as being the faculty for, or the act of imagination, about impossible or improbably things (if my memory serves me correct).

Are you perhaps not convinced by this definition of this word, and somehow think the word "fantasy" is normative to simply mean a type of genre in fiction? Btw, the proper name for what you talked about is probably "fantasy literature" and not simply "fantasy". I do read about a "fantasy genre" on this random webpage that I looked at , though it is obvious that this "fantasy genre" is a subset of literature and thus it ought to be obvious that there is no such thing as a "fantasy genre" in any general terms, as if it was some idea disconnected from literature.

Either something is to be understood as a genre, or as fantasy, it cannot be both, unless you intend to subscribe to some kind of idiosyncractic idea which with these two words would be tautological in how it (heh) acts as a circular reference. Since "fantasy" is not an adjective, grammatically this might not even be allowed even if you wanted to.

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Posted: Nov 24th 2011 5:35AM EuchridEucrow said

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@Critical Mass

Sheldon Cooper called and would like his trite and specious pseudo-intellectual blather back. He would also like to take back the maundering that you borrowed as well.

Big words are fun!
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Posted: Nov 23rd 2011 8:13AM Aang said

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No it has not. And I would think most feel the same because they have already made up their minds weather or not to try this game out.

Whats more interesting to me is, this game is one of the more polarizing MMOs to be launched recently. People seem to either love it or hate it with a majority being in favor of it.

However, for me personally I was disappointed with the game play and bugs during my beta weekend. And yes yes yes....I know it was BETA but I honestly thought it would have much more polish since its so close to launch.

Flame away

Posted: Nov 23rd 2011 10:45AM Equillian said

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@Aang

Didnt you know? it's cool to hate! You must not be cool.

Guess I'm not either, +1. ;)
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Posted: Nov 23rd 2011 8:14AM (Unverified) said

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Yes

The graphics turned me off first thing, they look real dated to most games out right now and coming out.

Posted: Nov 23rd 2011 8:16AM Lockisezmode said

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@(Unverified) The examples of the graphics have been readily available for almost a year now. If you are going to troll at least do it right.
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Posted: Nov 23rd 2011 8:22AM Bramen said

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@Lockisezmode
I think it is fair to talk about graphics. But I would counter that it was a business choice. The SW brand will pull in enough players, the more of those people who can actually play the game will be determined by how low they set the graphics bar. Not as many people have a high end gaming machine as those with spreadsheet-blasters. So they chose to cast a wider net by lowering graphics. We will see if it pays out.
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Posted: Nov 23rd 2011 8:24AM nathanb said

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Bioware games aren't played for their graphics.
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Posted: Nov 23rd 2011 8:34AM TexRob said

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@(Unverified) I don't love player models when it comes to faces, but other than that, you clearly haven't played the game. The game looks fantastic in person. I'm not going to say SWTOR doesn't screenshot well, but it doesn't do it great. It's no Fallen Earth (worst game I've seen in screenshots that looks great in person).
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