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Reader Comments (69)

Posted: Nov 24th 2011 11:56AM smartstep said

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@bri0420

Ok, but then problem lies in society and parents and while I know that kids need to have fun, if they are really so busy then only way then can play is in middle of the night then they will have to cut on sleep time - and better for them and their health is to sleep than play.

Anyway seems like Korean society is really mistreating their kids, and I am talking about working their asses and 'buying' their kids behaviour.
Sounds horrible!
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Posted: Nov 24th 2011 1:50PM Space Cobra said

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@smartstep

It's actually not just Korean, but an Asian mindset. The book "Tiger Mom" is a pretty common view of raising kids. Asian parents push their kids and while that can be good, it can have its problems, too.

Like I said, it is not unusual to see "kids" or teens working late hours in Asia, either for parents' business or someone else. The "work-ethic" is even abused by bosses toward everyone, not just kids, where there are not too many worker's rights (No overtime pay and in many cases, no standard pay if you work overtime, but if you don't, you get fired).
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Posted: Nov 25th 2011 9:44AM smartstep said

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@Space Cobra

Well putting SOME responsibilities and work-ethics for kids is not bad, point is to do it in balanced way.

Giving no responsibilities (like in many western societes) and too much responsibilities (seems which is common in Asia) is bad.

Teen working sometimes in parent's business in nothing bad, it is bad though if kid is treated like free work-force working too-long and not getting paid.

You know helping in parent's shop for like 10-15 h / week is nothing bad especially if you pay your kid and this does not collide with his education / socialisation, but forcing your kid to work everyday like normal worked is obviously bad.
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Posted: Nov 24th 2011 10:11AM Malagarr said

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Good for South Korea. They aren't banning adults from playing. They are simply putting an online curfew into effect for those under 16. No different than the numerous curfews cities here in the US have keeping kids indoors after a certain time of night.

Bravo to South Korea (though I do always think it's a shame when government has to step in to do what parents should already be doing).

Posted: Nov 24th 2011 6:58PM (Unverified) said

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@Malagarr
There is a big difference between this and a curfew in a city. A curfew means that if a police officer seems someone outside after it and ask for ID, it is shown, if they are over 18 they go about their business.

An internet "curfew" isn't so simple. How does this get enforced only against those underage? From the sounds of it from a previous poster who lives in the region, it doesn't. They merely shut down the entire network thus denying access to ALL.

And if you tried enforcing it only against minors, it would then mean forcing people, all people, to identify themselves to just about everything on the interent to prove whether or not they could be there. Do we want that level of invasiveness in our lives?
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Posted: Nov 25th 2011 3:15AM SkuzBukit said

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I just use the tools already available as a parent, live essentials has a family safety suite that you can use to set playing times for your children on their own accounts & also monitor what they are doing, a little forethought & care avoids all this messy & wasted legislation, let the politicians takle more important stuff I say.

Posted: Nov 25th 2011 11:15PM mattwo said

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These are kids we're talking about.

At best they'd likely set up their own accounts and spoof the age. It's not that hard to do.

Posted: Nov 28th 2011 2:35PM TwistedComplex said

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Pint-sized communism. Plain and simple

"Don't worry about the rights of children, they're just kids"

If you accept that premise than you accept the premise that children and less than human and don't deserve the same amount of rights that adults do.

But hey, the government does it with alcohol, cigarettes... They can't even f*** for gods sake, so why not just strip them completely of their rights?

Posted: Nov 29th 2011 2:33AM (Unverified) said

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@TwistedComplex
So what rights should children have in your opinion? Should they be allowed to sign contracts and be sured if they do not uphold the terms of the contract? Should the be allowed to drink, smoke, vote? And from what age? Birth?

Sorry, but children have no rights. They do not have the knowledge or experience to be held accountable, that is why parents are legally responsible for them until they become legal adults.
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