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Reader Comments (69)

Posted: Nov 23rd 2011 9:00PM vtravi said

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This law should be called the "Common Sense Law"

I know people hate government interfering with their life but Really, this is just good common sense

Posted: Nov 23rd 2011 9:05PM (Unverified) said

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@vtravi
No, this is the "Parents aren't doing their jobs so we have to do it for them" law. Common sense would have been for parents to keep their kids from spending their lives on an MMO before government got involved.

While I don't think this law in and of itself is bad, I do agree with another poster in their concern of where might this lead.
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Posted: Nov 23rd 2011 9:10PM vtravi said

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@(Unverified)
Well I for one, used to sneak into the living room to play Sega Genesis at all times of the night. What was my mother to do, she was sleeping, I was quiet. Should she have locked me in my room or stayed up all night to watch me?

This was minor stuff but you can't always blame parents. If it is a major problem for their country then the government has to step in. Weather or not this is a major problem can be debated.
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Posted: Nov 23rd 2011 10:46PM (Unverified) said

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@vtravi
My parents used to disconnect the console. Not to mention most games I know of in the MMO genre have parental controls that allow a parent to state when a player can be on at what times. A PC can have parental software that won't allow it to be used unless the parental password is input. There are a lot of options.

The point is, if this wasn't a widespread problem, there would have been no need for government to get involved. If parents were were doing what they should, it wouldn't have gotten to be a widespread problem.
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Posted: Nov 23rd 2011 11:55PM Space Cobra said

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@vtravi @(unverified) #2

See, this is what I did, too. Sneak at night and play games. I also think it does no harm.

However, being a parent is a bit like intellectual one-upsmanship/brinksmanship. In some ways, your kid is outsmarting you but you have to outsmart your kid. Not only that, you have to decided *if* you should outsmart your kid or let him think he has one over on you (which, IMO, builds some confidence). Sometimes if you swat down kids once too often, they will regret it. I know parents want to protect their kids, but experience can be the best teacher compared to "telling your kids what to do".

These problems are nothing new, especially if you look back into the past (Horror comics getting outlawed. Kids hanging in shopping malls. Cruising at night in cars). I think it can be all too easy to forget what it was like or how one thought at that age and that is a shame. I always try to remember my frame of mind and review it. I can see changes mentally in how I percieved things as opposed to when I was younger.

In any event, in my humble opinion, if a kid is doing what he needs to do and it is not adversely affecting his grades and chores, have at it, especially on the weekends. But there must be some control. There must be some time set aside. Some kids (and people) need that structure and need to be told to go to bed. Parenting is more art than science and each individual case is different. A blanket law may help some situations, but hurt other situations that are just fine.

For example, it can be fairly popular to "draft" kids to work in one's family business, especially in Asia and Korea. Restaurants and other such venues that they may go to work after school and only leave at closing (or slightly before or slightly after). Of course, Asian parents want them to do their homework first, but what about after that? Sure, sleep is a popular option, but sometimes, especially if homework gets done early, kids need some opportunities to goof off and play. And heck, it's probably better if they play an MMO or single-player game than go out at night and roam.

Again, different situations. And again, this is an example of a "blanket law" not fitting everyone and being a knee-jerk reaction by conservatives viewing this as a bigger problem than what it may be and wanting to do "something" to control it.

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Posted: Nov 24th 2011 10:30AM wahahabuh said

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@vtravi she could've stopped you by simply taking the power cable. Done. No law required. My parents did that back when I was too young and immature to be responsible for myself.
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Posted: Nov 23rd 2011 9:20PM hami83 said

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Yeah. I have to agree. Canada and the US need this law.

Anyone saying it's "socialist" or "communist". Aside from using those terms incorrectly can go away.

The fact is, it's the parents job to enforce these kinds of restrictions, and the truth is that a lot of parents in Canada and the US are just not good parents. So either the government steps in and makes laws like this or they force the parents to be educated on proper parenting.
At which I would say do both, but good luck getting parents to be forced educated on how to be a good parent without taking a huge hissy fit.

Posted: Nov 23rd 2011 10:32PM Irem said

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@hami83
This is less about the specific circumstances the law covers and more about what kind of message it sends. I think most of us can agree that kids should not be up all night playing video games (at least, not on a regular basis), but it's also questionable as to how much of a problem that actually is that it requires a law to enforce. It sounds reasonable, but it starts to edge into an area of uncomfortable oversight where what's "bad" for a kid begins to be based on subjective opinions and get kind of nitpicky. That's not the kind of precedent that needs to be set.
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Posted: Nov 23rd 2011 10:06PM freelancer91 said

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Koreans have a very strange understanding of the Cinderella story...I know it has to do with the whole "you must rush yourself into a marriage by 12am or there is no pie for you" premise, but couldn't they think of something better than that?

Posted: Nov 23rd 2011 11:30PM Space Cobra said

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@freelancer91

I don't think it's so strange (although maybe relating it to the Cinderella myth is in Western eyes).

Cinderella had to rush home before midnight or have her clothes turn back into the rags whe wore and her carriage/horses turn back into pumpkins and mice. Basically, she had a "curfew", so this relates to it. I would guess naming it "Cinderella" is a bit of "speaking down to children" by relating a child's fairy tale to a law.
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Posted: Nov 23rd 2011 10:08PM Tanek said

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Ok, let's say a law like this were put in place for the U.S. If someone does not know that their child is sneaking onto the internet at night, what's to say they know the age information on that child's game account is accurate. If that kid really wants to play and can get around the parents already, he or she will still find a way to play despite the law.

What I would like to see, though, are more games that provide good tools for parents to manage things on their own. Parental controls available on every account that use a different password and email address. Encourage those who want to know what their child is up to to use the controls and take a more active interest in the behavior on the account.

Posted: Nov 23rd 2011 10:51PM (Unverified) said

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@Tanek
For the PC there is already software that can be setup, even within Windows itself. Not to mention games like WoW have parental controls where times can be set up for an account to be playable. In other words if mom or dad says on WoW's parental controls that their account (since a minor is not supposed to have an account, it is supposed to be the parents) can not be played after 11pm without the proper parental password, then little Johnny get's kicked off at 11pm regardless of what he is doing.

I would hope many PS3, Wii and Xbox 360 games are similar. Of course those are easy enough to turn off and disconnect and put away in a clost where a computer wouldn't be as easy to do that with.
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Posted: Nov 24th 2011 2:44AM Amlin said

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As a person that grew up and came from an Asian country I can tell you that there's far more laws in place that would make westerners raise an eye brow (Chewing gum for example is outlawed in some southeast asian countries). To them this is practical and it makes sense, to many of you that grew up in the west it doesn't. I understand that, the west raises their kids differently.

I simply find it funny how transparent Nexon and NCsoft is with their argument. It was obvious they were going to take legal action.

Posted: Nov 24th 2011 5:43AM dudes said

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The trade channels should be more interesting or at least readable between 12 am to 6 am then. *joke*

Posted: Nov 24th 2011 8:48AM SiyamakSordes said

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People are forgetting a very wonderful and great perspective of this law:

no more obnoxious little shits on the mic after midnight. A whole six hours in which (if the law is properly enforced) you will not have to deal with annoying little twerps in any way, shape, or form.

Posted: Nov 24th 2011 6:51PM (Unverified) said

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@SiyamakSordes
It sounds all nice and wonderful until some government decides that adults can become addictive and that the loss of tax revenue from the loss of work of the addicted person(s) is too much to lose so they make a law like this for all ages.

Wonder how you will view that?
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Posted: Nov 24th 2011 10:23PM SiyamakSordes said

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@(Unverified)

Except I never will, because the US is capitalistic and companies wouldn't let stuff like that fly in congress, they'd lobby to hell and back against it and here they actually have power. While a certain portion of the populace might approve of such a law over here, I honestly believe the majority of people would be against it (especially if it included "adult" aged people.) In addition you're also completely forgetting that games generate tax money. Those companies that run all those games? They get taxed. They generate money to the government like any other business, and the more players they have spending money, the more the government gets in taxes from the business since it's all percentage based. This law, if anything, sounds entirely moral based and has nothing to do with actual business and money making. If someone can prove otherwise, go for it, I'd love to see the documents. In the meantime, you keep on trying to come up with poorly thought out serious comebacks to what was originally a sarcastic (even if mean or snarky,) comment.
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Posted: Nov 25th 2011 1:24PM (Unverified) said

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@SiyamakSordes
The government makes tax revenue hand over fist on cigarette sales yet make laws all the time restricting and outlawing their use. No, they haven't banned them yet, but the analogy to the gaming is similar since no one is talking about banning of MMO's, just the restricting of usage.

So don't go thinking the government only cares about tax revenue. Politicians will slit their own throats if they think they can get an issue which will leave them in office for years on end.
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Posted: Nov 24th 2011 8:55AM BGExorcist said

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Now if only someone is as smart as to type in false data.. like I do because I hate every registration out there asking for my home city, adress, and dental records.

Posted: Nov 24th 2011 9:07AM bri0420 said

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I also currently live in Korea and the reason why gamers are so upset here is because this law doesn't just affect children under 16, but adult gamers as well. I don't know about PS but as far as XBOX goes, the only way to ensure kids aren't playing past midnight is to shut down the whole system and cut off access to the microsoft servers. Good thing my gold membership is done in a few months!

And for all of the commenters who brought up parenting. Let me give you some insight into the life of a Korean student. They have school from around 8am to 3pm. After leaving public school, children here go to an average of 3 various private academies a day studying specific subjects of their choice (usually English, Math or music). After that, they go home, eat dinner and study until the wee hours of the morning. Some kids even go home to empty houses and have to fend for themselves while their moms and dads are drinking with their friends and co-workers. Kids are neglected, forced to work their asses off and don't have time to be kids. They are taught that money is everything (parents motivate kids by promising smartphones as a reward for good marks!) and education is the way to money. So, is it really surprising that they want to spend every free minute they have fighting Zerg swarms?

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