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Reader Comments (37)

Posted: Nov 12th 2011 2:23PM Drannos said

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@Bramen

It's not about being entertained. It's about coming together in a place and fashion in which a groupd of friends knows and loves. And for those of us who form real bonds online, the game becomes more than a game - it becomes a second home.

And believe me, if I could have gone in person, I would have; I never met my guild leader face-to-face, but he was a good friend, and even up to the week before his death, he was cheerful, kind, and more than willing to lend a hand to any and all. He was eternally optimistic. He loved the game (LotRO) and our guild - what better way to celebrate his life?
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Posted: Nov 12th 2011 3:46PM Laephis said

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@Drannos

Games are about entertainment. Sorry if you've fooled yourself into thinking otherwise, but it doesn't change the facts. If you care about a person, you'll take the time and effort to show up at their real funeral. Yes, that might take some money and considerably effort on your part, but that's the whole point.
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Posted: Nov 13th 2011 9:19AM HiroProtagonist7 said

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@Laephis

Everything is exactly what you believe it to be.
Game? Social Network? Community?
Much is lost in these times of F2P ADD MMO schlock, but not your ability to decide what things mean to you for yourself.

Just because you can't find a community or think that drinking with your shift mates from McDonalds is somehow more valuable than talking about your day with friends on Vent does not make it so for everyone. Just you.
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Posted: Nov 12th 2011 12:24PM Trololol said

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Never been to a funeral. But i want to adress that WoW incedent, I really think it was disrespectfull and all... but that movie they released (the one withe the music edited in and all) , well it was kinda do i dare say it? cool? It showed the true meaning of a ''do whatever you want'' game, that was kinda new for me back then. But still ganking nelfs and gnomes, thats just bad.

Posted: Nov 12th 2011 12:26PM Seldra said

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I knew a person who was a guildmate when I played WoW and passed away, while we didn't do anything ingame, during a meet up in Blizzcon we did pay a visit to his resting place.

Now how people decide to deal with this kind of emotional trauma is their choice and I'm not one to judge that. I think everyone has their own way of handling mourning.

Posted: Nov 12th 2011 3:00PM randomepicperson said

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I only know one person in game who died, and I'm a european on an american server. So my kinship (lotro guild) held the funeral at 2am. Not a good day.

Posted: Nov 12th 2011 3:59PM real65rcncom said

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No.

Roleplay or not, this is just creepy, I'm sorry.

If a player I had played with died in real life, I wouldn't attend a "in-game" funeral either.

This is just too weird.

Posted: Nov 12th 2011 6:01PM SwarlesBarkley said

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In Lotro on Vilya Sept 2010 we lost one of the best known creeps on the server to a car accident. There was a huge turn out memorial in his favorite moors location. The screenshots spoke for themselves. It was a very moving experience and amazed me at how many people could come together on both sides for one person who we only knew by voice and his crazy yet awesome fighting tactics and class he showed in the game. RIP Rekka.

Posted: Nov 12th 2011 10:45PM Tizmah said

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Well, during the golden age of MMOs, mainly Ultima and EQ, people across the server were involved in the community. And someone who was highly respected and a big back bone of the community died, It makes perfect sense to honor them in the game. To say everyone should pack up and go to the real life funeral is just plain silly when people live miles and miles away.

I guess some people would think..those people are simply "playing funeral". I find it remarkable, even in a virtual world, humanity still honors each other.

I guess it's hard for the new generation of gamers who bunny hop from one new MMO to the other to understand that.

Posted: Nov 12th 2011 11:38PM Bramen said

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I get that. Going to a favorite hang out spot for a group of buddies to celebrate the life of one who is gone is a universal human trait. The danger is taking a death and making it trivial. The way Brianna Royce treated this article is what caused me to make the above post. I didn't read your comment until after you responded to mine and I didn't know what you were talking about.
Here is what I was thinking when I made my comment above. I was commenting against the attitude that some may have towards a guild mate who died. The "I only knew you in the game, so I will only remember you in the game", attitude sends a message to the dead person's relatives "He was only important to me in the game" or "His loss is only felt in my entertainment." If a co-worker had a loss you would send flowers. How much more should it be for a friend? Go ahead and make that out of game connection. It makes it more real and heartfelt for the family who weren't gamers.

You can thumbs down my comment all you want, but deep down inside you know it is the truth. If you lose a friend, acknowledge that it was a real out-of-game loss not just, and in game thing. It's ok to do something in game, but do something out of game as-well.

Now, Drannos, it sucks to lose someone to cancer. My own mom has had cancer twice. So I get the emotion involved. My above comment was directed at Brianna Royce for being so flippant about deaths in the article and morbidly curious about how people morn.

Posted: Nov 13th 2011 12:06AM Acesfury said

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Wurm has a large monument built by the players on the West shore of Freedom Isle. It was built last year after one of our players passed away.
Over 20 players spent more then 200hrs to build it and two of the local villages keep it maintained at all times.

Posted: Nov 13th 2011 2:10AM Thawedtheorc said

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Every time I hear of one, I still think of the one those folks did on the pvp server.. and got their butts smashed. It is an awful thing to lose someone to death. Has happened to me an unusual amount of times. (child, younger brother and family and friends under 40- In fact today is the anniversary of my brother dying at the age of 15).

But to have an in game funerals tend to be something that is created to be a public display. In so doing, they make demands on others to change their gaming habits to show respect. That is something in which I do not agree.

No matter how much of a loss you endure, you have no right to demand something of another's time and energy.

So my point is people can have them if they wish, but do it somewhere silently and create your own chat channel. To me that would be nicer jester. Doing it publicly is just asking for conflict and trolling.

Posted: Nov 13th 2011 2:39AM eLdritchZ said

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I have to say I find it kind of weird to have a funeral for your character because you're "quitting the game".

I attended a funeral in DAoC of someone who actually died. Hersinde from Lyonesse/Hibernia. That was probably the most honest and beautiful moment I ever witnessed in an MMO. 600 people attended to pay their respects to someone they only knew online.

Too bad the communities have become so rotten in most games that something like that will probably never happen again...

Posted: Nov 13th 2011 5:21AM peyo01 said

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I am sad to read so many here have lost a good friend met through gaming. It never happened to me, but makes me sad to see it occur so often.
I should get used to it because, you know, "so life goes", but I guess and hope I never will.

Posted: Nov 13th 2011 7:43PM Mount said

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I haven't attended any in-game funerals, but a few years back, I did attend and participate in a day-long vigil in City of Heroes, to commemorate the passing of Christopher Reeve. Players spent in-game currency (sometimes in SIGNIFICANT AMOUNTS) to recreate the costume Reeve immortalized on film, and spent the day in a well-traveled area holding a military-salute emote. It was kind of amazing to see people pass by who were unaware of the reason for the vigil, only to return minutes later in blue tights with red trunks to join in.

Posted: Nov 13th 2011 11:01PM Cadeyrn said

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Yes, one of our dear friends passed away suddenly. We knew she had a health problem, but nobody expected what happened. She was always the life of the party, ready to go anywhere and do anything at any time. She was a counselor and friend and a cheerful carefree spirit who (inadvertently) started our occasional Naked AB parties. It was a terrible blow for everyone. Like most guilds, we had people scattered everywhere across the US and even the UK so there was no way people could get to Ohio to pay their respects in person. All we could do was gather together in game to pay our respects. RIP, Bevs. We still love and miss you. Elite Empire and Bitter Harvest Hall remember.

Posted: Nov 15th 2011 11:53AM Zoan said

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Yes, I once "attended" an in-game funeral in Planetside.

By which I mean "participated in the organized dive-bombing of an in-game funeral, swooping into a shielded base and giving the gent a send-off he would actually have appreciated."

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