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Reader Comments (6)

Posted: Nov 6th 2011 12:53PM jimr9999us said

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What dev's are discovering is like any other hobby there's a huge range of what folks will play to participate, based on their disposable income and their perceived value of the money they spend in the game.

That's the primary reason the LotRO model has been so successful and so widely copied. You can literary play the whole game without spending a dime, or you can spend $100+ a month. The model effectively mirrors our society.

For me however, those models negatively impact my immersion in the game. I live in a real life where the gap between the haves and have nots grows wider every day. I prefer to spend time in a true fantasy world where the games economy is part of the fantasy world I chose to play in.

Posted: Nov 6th 2011 6:58PM DarkWalker said

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@jimr9999us
What I think was the stroke of genius in the LotRO model is how all players receive small amounts of store cash for just playing. It's usually a few cents at a time, but given a few days playing the game and anyone should have enough "free" cash to merit a visit to the store.

Plus, the rate of cash accumulation is low enough that it's not really worth farming it. An hour of efficient farming should earn the player less than $1 worth of store cash. Just earning $1 extra and paying it to Turbine is a better use of most people's time. So, apart from the cheapskates that wouldn't purchase anything anyway, Turbine should not be losing many sales.
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Posted: Nov 6th 2011 1:17PM (Unverified) said

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About being good, I canĀ“t deny that, it impressed me. About the part of being widely copied, care for an example?

Posted: Nov 6th 2011 11:53PM Utakata said

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If I read VikingGamer correctly, this is what I would constitute a reasonable and fair F2P. One that allows you gain all items in a cash shop eventaully without having to spend a dime. But allows those who are impatient and have the money to gain access to it right away. It's by no means perfect...there's still the "2nd class citizen" feel to this model for those who don't want to or can't pay. But at least one still can obtain everything ingame if they want if they work at it reasonabley.

I understand that devs are into making games to make money. I can understand why then this model would be unattractive to them. But I think too a more long term even altruistic approach to developing this type of model may not get them the big profits right away. Intead having it may give them a far more stable long term paying and dedicated community is the better way to go.

Posted: Nov 7th 2011 9:33AM Dynty said

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thre is one more thing....1$ or 1Euro is not the same for everyone..i dont mean Rich kid versus gamer,but lets say gamer in Germany and gamer on Ukraine..both of them work as an IT support,but one is making 2 000 euro and the second 200. That 10times more.

Pay to win started on MMO free shards/emulators such as Ultima,later on Ragnarok and Lineage 2. It was called "Donate" and everyone hated it,and players who used pay2win in any other way than to have Gold name (to support the server) etc,were called noobs,and were quiet about the items they bought with RL cash. Same for "unofficial" gold buyers in WoW etc.

Later on p2win becomes industry standart. It is sick.

Posted: Nov 7th 2011 11:52AM blackcat7k said

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@Dynty

It's here to stay unfortunately because we gamers allowed the practice to take root:

You spend years giving money to an MMO. Now you're a veteran, but you're also given an in game advantage in the form of some power/item.

You pre-order a game, you're given an in game power/item that no one else can get. You're allowed to start earlier and establish a foot hold before anyone else can.

I think we should stop calling MMOs "games" because they've lost one of the main tenants of what constitutes a game: Equal Footing. Many of us would balk if the Olympics Games adopted any of the practices that MMOs do today as standard.

The amount of money spent shouldn't affect your power. The amount of time you spend shouldn't equal more power. You should pay to access the game, you should pay for new challenges, you should pay for cosmetic things that don't affect the gameplay. However, how well you do should be wholly up to the skill of the player and the friends they make while playing.

The amount of time you spend grinding shouldn't equal to you having more power. More stuff, more abilities sure, but being able to faceroll your way through challenges because of time spent ends up breaking many of these MMOs and turning new challenges into a joke.

The d20 system... its holes are becoming apparent. We need something new.
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