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Reader Comments (31)

Posted: Oct 15th 2011 9:36PM Shazzie said

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I know exactly what you mean by 'getting rid of the BAD makes you lose some of the GOOD'.

I know that sitting around and waiting for the boat, or waiting for your turn at a spawn, or sitting at the dungeon zone in LFG was boring, and time consuming, and a whole lot of 'doing nothing', but in all those situations I MET people. I chatted with people in the downtimes, I made friends in the downtimes. I have not in any game since EQ encountered as many situations as conducive to interaction as EQ's downtimes were.

Now I just hop in a game and in the shortest time imaginable I'm off doing whatever my plans were for the evening, rushing from A to B because there's no reason to stop and everything is catered to getting you to your goal as easily as possible. 'Get in, get done, get out' is the mantra for gaming nowadays. I don't really meet people any more. My friends list in EQ had over 5x the amount of people on it any game since has had.


@Lionhearted: You know, back in my days in EQ, the 'holy trinity' was Healer/Tank/Enchie (or possibly Shaman). It took a while for my brain to rewire DPS for the CC's spot. DPS was a given, sure, but it came after the other classes that were the core you needed to build from and then add the DPS to.

Posted: Oct 15th 2011 11:16PM Kalex716 said

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@Shazzie

I agree with you Shazzie, difficulty required people to rely on their relationships as well. Not only did you keep a healthy friendlist, you maintained it because knowing a good wizzard or druid that would come teleport you if you really needed it was nice. And a good cleric, and chanter who really knew how to mez, or monks that could pull, or just someone that always made groups fun because he was personable and made everyone laugh was WORTH having in your circle.

Games like everquest, focused on the community side of gaming, and less on the instant gratification, and self absorption you see in modern games.
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Posted: Oct 15th 2011 11:12PM Yukon Sam said

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I probably would have made the same choice, were I not already deeply involved in UO.

Regardless of my personal experiences, EverQuest deserves its lauds.
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Posted: Oct 16th 2011 2:28AM Zombie Jesus said

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At times EQ frustrated me, but as much frustration as it brought me it also brought me feel that accomplishment that so many MMOs these days don't seem to bring.

I used to play a chanter, and playing a support class in that game was a game within itself. During raids while everyone was doing damage I was off making sure mezzes were kept up, that tash and slow were on the main targets and that everyone knew what was mezzed. That buffs were up and refreshed if someone got dispelled and basically processing that all at once.

Groups were symbiotic which separated the good players from the bad ones. If someone wasn't doing their part, the rest of the group or raid knew it because everyone was doing a corpse run.

Add to that, every fight in EQ had an unpredictability factor that games don't seem to have anymore. Back then I would have a general idea when a mez would wear off, but it was never concrete. So I was always processing information, watching every mob and making sure mezzes were refreshed and any new adds either from a respawn or a train were being dealt with.

MMOs these days, the fights are predictable, know the pattern, know when the adds arrive, stay out of the fire and eventually anything dies. Sure there's a 2 minute nice feeling that it's dead but I don't ever really want to do it again. Whereas something like breaking into the Plane of Hate or single handly stopping a bad pull from getting worst never got old.

Posted: Oct 16th 2011 6:17AM Obext said

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Im a bit forlorn reading this article and comparing an 11 yr old MMO like EQ to the ones that are currently out now and nothing can touch EQ's gameplay/immersion (UO was great too).

But i agree 100% what everyone else is saying and that everything now is too convenient. Games now have "training wheels" attached to them.

Posted: Oct 16th 2011 10:27AM Nepentheia said

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The "magic" of Everquest was quite simple: everything you did was not easy, and thus, everything you accomplished felt like it mattered.

The entire dynamic of "mouse-presses-lever-for-cheese" was extremely difficult and intense in that game--and each piece of cheese obtained was genuinely rewarding.

It was a big deal getting level 5! And getting level 20 and getting a surname was a really huge deal! And getting past that hell-level of 35 was a genuine rite of passage. In the very early days of Everquest, every level was hard to get and so every level mattered. The concept of 'power-leveling to get to the end as fast as possible' didn't exist way back then.

It was a big deal traveling from point A to point B. People were intimately familiar with each zone and how to travel through them--because you had to, if you were going to survive.

There was a tremendous amount of risk in that game--consequences really did matter, you really could lose everything--equipment, money, levels (and reputation--people didn't like playing with crappy players who were only going to get them killed). There was no instant gratification. People had to play well with others and play a lot smarter if they were going to succeed in that game.

There was a captivating, addictive intensity about Everquest back-in-the-day that absolutely does not exist in any current game (including Everquest itself nowdays). Everything you did felt like it mattered. Every level, every item, every skill-up was hard to get, but when you got it, it felt good, really good.

Posted: Oct 16th 2011 11:57AM DerpMchurson said

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Another aspect of the game I loved was the epic quests. You actually had to earn your weapon, instead of pug'ing heroics till you can buy a piece of armor or whatever.

Posted: Oct 16th 2011 12:57PM (Unverified) said

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I spent most of my time in EQ selling things in the ECom tunnel on my level 20 druid, but I don't think i've ever been as happy playing an mmorpg as when I could finally affrord my yaks for my little lvl 5 bard, or my wurmslayer/tranq cane + cobalt for my lvl 10 war.

That's probably the thing I miss most, all the games today everything is level locked and soul bound.

Posted: Oct 16th 2011 3:14PM Yawinsum said

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So many good memories of old school Everquest. The only maps you had were printed off the internet and kept in a three ring binder. Seeing a level 1 character wearing full bronze and thinking, omg he's twinked! Getting my paladin's flaming sword the Fiery Avenger and then showing it off to all the newbies running around outside Kaladim. Breaking into Plane of Fear or Hate and the subsequent dread of having to try to break back into it while naked because the raid wiped. Brell those were the days!

Posted: Oct 16th 2011 5:24PM (Unverified) said

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Great article Karen and so true. Everquest will always hold a very special place in my heart. Many good times and memories.

Posted: Oct 17th 2011 7:40AM Zyco said

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EQ1 is still the best MMO out.. and EQ2 isnt bad either. I subscribe and play both a few months outta the year still.

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