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Reader Comments (12)

Posted: Oct 13th 2011 2:13PM Alex Oglitchkin said

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I don't think you really did anything wrong by not giving the Ranger an item. I would have asked him straight up on the side what his intentions were before making a decision. Personally I hate the whole officer chat stuff that leaves people in the dark. I rather have the straight forward approach where everyone hears it or I take the person to the side and deal with it. I think MMOs have become easier due to the fact people are constantly leaving for other games to get a new experience. It's not easy to replace quality players who show up all the time either.

Posted: Oct 13th 2011 2:22PM BigAndShiny said

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I can't wait to see what the real 'next generation' of MMOs bring. [2013+]
Maybe it will be Titan, maybe something else, but I have a feeling that then I won't need to say "I'm sure Ill see you guys in another game" anywhere near as often!

Posted: Oct 13th 2011 2:33PM Seldra said

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I've left guilds and I have meant what I said when I told players they can always hit me up. You can't always get along with everyone in the guild or the guild just doesn't have the ability to keep up with your skill level. Whatever the case sometimes you gotta go, and for me I try not to leave on bad terms, and I do meet cool people in guilds all the time. Still hang out with them even if they're not part of the guild I'm in.

Posted: Oct 14th 2011 3:10PM Ref Minor said

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@Seldra
That's the OP's point, you leave guilds because they don't keep up with your skill level rather than improve your guild, you are just using them.
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Posted: Oct 13th 2011 2:47PM Seffrid said

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My experience of guilding in EQ1 was varied.

My first guild, the Elite Corps of Norrath, was a wonderful guild, well led and with tremendous support from the officers. I've have stayed the course in that guild but for the fact that it fell apart when the guild leader took leave of absence for the particularly weak reason that his house had burnt down!

In my second guild (no names from hereon) it took me very little time to realise I'd made a mistake. As a druid I was being constantly hounded for ports, and one evening when I was helping out a friend and needed to be uninterrupted I went "anon", and within seconds received a tell from the guild leader informing me that it wasn't acceptable practice in HIS guild, and that I should remove "anon" or be removed immediately from the guild. My reasoning fell on deaf ears so I told him I'd save him the trouble!

My third guild was a decent one, but before long the guild leader threw a tantrum on the forums in a wholly puerile way, notwithstanding that she was a mature adult, and several days of guild politics later I despaired of the whole leadership situation and was gone.

My last guild was a one evening affair. To celebrate my joining I was invited to join a guild group by way of a special privilege, only to be sent a tell from the guild leader after several wipes that the cleric's transparent uselessness was due to her playing her friend's account and that she normally played a warrior. I sensed an omen there, and moved on.

Why do I mention this rambling history of personal guild involvement? In order to stress how important a guild leader is to any guild, and how lucky any guild is to have a decent one.

I've no doubt that in one sense the burden of guild leadership has been increased by modern gaming patterns in that members are no longer as dependable as they were when there was only the one game of its type to play! On the other hand, if guild leaders can recognise that they don't hold their members on balls and chains and that they are free to log in or not according to what they want to do then it must be easier to lead, because the pressures are less than in the days when you had to provide guild-based action 24/7.

I haven't actually been in a guild since EQ1. In all honesty I haven't felt the need or desire, having held my share of officer positions (as well as kingdom ruler and city minister in various MUDs before MMOs came along), and I'm happy to solo my way through MMOs with sole responsibity for my choices and actions and without needing to commit to anyone of an evening or weekend outside my RL family. However, good luck to all who do guild, and not least to those who lead a guild as it remains a pretty thankless task!

Posted: Oct 13th 2011 3:20PM N620AA said

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@Seffrid "On the other hand, if guild leaders can recognise that they don't hold their members on balls and chains and that they are free to log in or not according to what they want to do then it must be easier to lead, because the pressures are less than in the days when you had to provide guild-based action 24/7."

I wish this was true, but it is not in most cases. Because the regulars, the guys that -are- dependable, still expect you to provide regular guild action. They don't want to sit around twiddling their thumbs because Johnny can't tell you what he'll be doing two hours from now, or because Jen doesn't believe in schedules and refuses to tell you when she'll be available, even if the question is whether she'll be on to raid tonight.

So as a leader of a guild that raids (which is not necessarily a raiding guild), you're basically stuck with the same expectations and pressures (to organize and run successful guild activities on a regular basis), but with fewer means to truly meet them because scrounging up the people to do stuff has gotten absurdly difficult.
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Posted: Oct 13th 2011 3:12PM Chiren said

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He would've left anyways. Your delegated choice saved your guild a "master spell" whatever the heck it is. Still, at the end of the day it just boils down to another "victory" on the internet.

Posted: Oct 13th 2011 3:46PM Khai mann said

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Guilds are wonderful... that's why in EVE I started my own Corp with only 2 members.... Me and my alt.... Enough said.....

Posted: Oct 13th 2011 4:29PM JuliusSeizure said

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I think you made the right choice ebcause if you'd handled it more smoothly the exact nature of the situation wouldn't have come so clearly to light. It usually takes a conflict to get people to open up, because human nature is just that messed up.

Posted: Oct 13th 2011 5:12PM nimzy said

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Ah, to return to the days of yore. Back when I was in college, I would watch over my friend's shoulder as he raided Zul'Gurub, and he would constantly complain to me about how badly his guild treated him and how much it sucked to be there. So I told him to get out.

In response, he crafted an elaborate scenario with another friend in the guild wherein the two pretended to be Vietnam vets with PTSD. They joke-pulled a raid boss, wiped everyone, and quit the guild with incoherent rambling about their combat experiences.

To this day I have no idea why he did that, but at the time I thought it was hilarious.

Posted: Oct 13th 2011 6:47PM TheClaw said

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@nimzy : I have a pretty good idea why he did that - because he's an asshole, who hasn't internalized the fact that other people on the internets are actually OTHER PEOPLE, not NPCs with slightly above-average AI.
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Posted: Oct 29th 2011 1:52AM githern said

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Meh, it was one item and the little guy got angry over it? Yeah, do you really want that kind of chaff filling your rosters? People expect a guild to provide everything to them in reality, you get what you give. I run my guilds on one main principle and that's Karma. You don't add anything to the guild, you won't get anything from it. It's just like life. Seems to work pretty well.

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