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Reader Comments (141)

Posted: Aug 28th 2011 3:17PM HokieKC said

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I always laugh when I read about stuff like this. There is a huge difference between a physiological and psychological dependence (medical definition of additions) versus behavorial 'addiction'.

Posted: Aug 30th 2011 9:04PM (Unverified) said

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@HokieKC

Yeah. Other one is "real" term of addiction other term is media's term of addiction.

Also when I read about:
"I also have concerns that my children may have a pre-disposition to gaming addiction in the same way that the children of an alcoholic might."

I just.. yeah. What?
They clearly act like gaming addiction might pass from father to son.
I dont think they fully understand this subject themselves. They singled out conserns about GAMING addiction being "just like alcohol addiction". I hardly doubt behaviour addiction can pass from father to son specially making it specifically addicted to GAMES and not lets say TV. I feel sorry for the kids as I can only imagine them going thro extensive therapy for "pre-treatment on possible gaming addiction" and will never see any games ever.
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Posted: Aug 28th 2011 3:18PM Song7 said

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sigh @ this article and really a book?

Posted: Aug 28th 2011 3:19PM slickie said

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"Video game addiction" is a myth.

Posted: Aug 28th 2011 3:42PM (Unverified) said

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@slickie
this statement is plain wrong.
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Posted: Aug 28th 2011 5:17PM slickie said

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@(Unverified) Only a few uneducated people seem to think video games somehow get you chemically addicted to them. Games cannot beam chemicals into your brain. It's physically impossible.
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Posted: Aug 28th 2011 5:57PM Yog said

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@slickie Sex addicts aren't injecting themselves with hormones to get themselves addictions and the same thing can hold true for other forms of addiction. The body produces hundreds of chemicals all by itself, some of them only occur during certain actions. One of them happens to be when you accomplish something. You get a jolt of dopamine after you accomplish something so you feel good about yourself and do it again. If someone isn't getting those jolts of dopamine through their real life they might be driven to do so through other means, gaming, for instance. Game addiction an actual occurrence and pretending otherwise just makes everyone more prone to it.
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Posted: Aug 28th 2011 6:17PM slickie said

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@Yog So you agree that video game addiction isn't an actual thing? This issue this author was struggling with was not "video game addiction". It was addiction. Someone can get addicted to rubbing rocks on their knees, if they enjoy it enough. I don't see any articles out there about 'rocky knee rubbing addiction'. Someone with an obsession with bananas doesn't go to get help for 'banana addiction'. I'm sure there are people out there who love the smell of cookies and go out of their way to smell it, but where are all the clinics for 'cookie odor addiction'?

There is too much of a spotlight on 'video game addiction', as though it's a valid form of addiction alongside drug addiction. All these efforts to 'fight video game addiction' would be best refocused to fighting addiction at its source. There are a billion trillion things people can become addicted to, and working against each one individually is a complete waste of time.
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Posted: Aug 28th 2011 6:35PM ShivanSwordsman said

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@slickie

Erm... it's a choice in terms of addiction. But people (ESPECIALLY loved ones) are nasty about throwing addiction out the gate to try and put leverage on any arguments they might have. Didn't buy your wife a new car? Obviously you're an addict and not working enough to make her the hottest cougaress in town when she's on the hunt... with your money. Kids screwing up? Obviously you're to blame for every bad decision they make, and whatever problem they can use to get a soapbox headup on you, they will.

This isn't to say some people don't get addicted... the very fact of the matter remains: Addictions are choices. All choices. You make the choice for all of this. You can choose to fight it, or not even start. You can choose to turn the PC off and go for a walk down the street. Though, I really don't blame this guy for wanting to tune people out for a while. It's called ME TIME, something we've apparently lost.
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Posted: Aug 28th 2011 7:13PM (Unverified) said

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@slickie Explain gambling addiction, then.
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Posted: Aug 28th 2011 8:54PM slickie said

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@(Unverified) Gambling is one of the billion trillion things a human being can become addicted to. The solution to helping people whose addiction is sated by gambling can be found by treating the base concept of addiction, and not by altering gambling.
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Posted: Aug 28th 2011 9:46PM Oskari said

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@slickie

"Only a few uneducated people seem to think video games somehow get you chemically addicted to them. Games cannot beam chemicals into your brain. It's physically impossible."

@Yog seemed to refute this point pretty concisely. There are whole schools of thought on how to make a person addicted to playing a video game, and developers frequently exploit these tricks in order gain and maintain their players.

Games may not "beam" chemicals into your brain, but they unnaturally exploit the ones that are already there.
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Posted: Aug 29th 2011 12:44AM Bramen said

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@slickie ""Video game addiction" is a myth." -slickie

"This issue this author was struggling with was not "video game addiction". It was addiction." -slickie

So according to you, video game addiction is a myth, because it is actually an addiction. I'm not sure I'm following the logic.

"Someone can get addicted to rubbing rocks on their knees." -slickie
So video game addiction is a myth because knee-rock rubbing addiction is real? I still don't follow.

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Posted: Aug 29th 2011 1:16AM relgoth said

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@Yog

As of the Current DSM-IV, which is how people are diagnosed with mental disorders, gaming addiction is not recognized. You can say its an addiction all you want but in the medical community its not recognized yet. It may or may not be further experiements will have to be done

You have no factual basis for your claim to stand on
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Posted: Aug 29th 2011 2:23AM hereafter said

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@Bramen

I think his point was that gaming addiction is equivalent to any behavioral addiction or compulsion that people have. I think he shouldn't disregard the potency of video games and players' penchant for falling too deep into a game-dominated lifestyle, but I think he's right that on a chemical level, it's not on par with something like being addicted to crack or whatever.
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Posted: Aug 29th 2011 5:33AM ShivanSwordsman said

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@Oskari

Then what the heck do you want? I'll admit that anything is addictive, but it seems everyone wants to blame the product, not themselves for growing the habit or having control. Are we supposed to "make games less fun" or police EVERYONE'S gaming time because of a few bad apples? No, no we're not. You blame the person, not the product for addiction.

Everyone knows cigarettes, drugs, etc are addictive, and they know they have addictive habits, yet they don't take responsibility and it keeps happening. Here's a movel idea. Got am addiction to eating? PUT THE GODDAMN FORK DOWN. Smoking? DON'T BUY ANYMORE. Gaming? PUT THE CONTROLLER DOWN AND GO FOR A WALK.

It's not the substance or the object that's the problem, it's the person, and the sooner these people shut the heck up and take responsibility, the sooner the rest of us get our freedoms back that we lost to protect those idiots, like "fatigue" systems in MMORPG and whatnot.
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Posted: Aug 29th 2011 8:02AM Acharenus said

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@ShivanSwordsman Anything to make it not there own fault for not having the willpower to manage there lives.
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Posted: Sep 3rd 2011 8:04AM EpiccFaill said

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@slickie no youre a myth
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Posted: Aug 28th 2011 3:19PM JohnD212 said

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So this guy lost his job because he played too much?? People like this say things like MMO's cause it but I suspect if it weren't an MMO he's be addicted to porn, or gambling...addicts will always find something. SO now he writes a book so he can profit off his addiction? He's like a parent who spent their teen years drinking and going out but then tells their children how bad it is to do. They want their cake ... then eat yours too.

ps.... addition instead of addiction made this story even more interesting to read.

Posted: Aug 28th 2011 3:29PM dudes said

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Oh dear oh dear. Learn a bit of discipline for *beeps* sake. Tai Chi is nice. And doing it means you aren't playing MMO's and taking a healthy break. Simples.

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