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Reader Comments (47)

Posted: Aug 12th 2011 9:43AM FrostPaw said

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Why should I pay for a security breach?

I'm paying a monthly fee so they can maintain the integrity of the servers already.
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Posted: Aug 12th 2011 9:59AM SgtBaker1234556 said

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@FrostPaw

Yeah, it's great to live in your black and white world, but the real world is not like that. Bugs happen. Security blunders happen.

You're all cool and security aware we get that, but getting authenticator still makes sense, no matter how much you pout in the corner.
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Posted: Aug 12th 2011 10:04AM KvanCetre said

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@FrostPaw
I'm not suggesting you should. I had blizzard authenticator for iOS, Android, and now a physical one, all of which were free for me.

I've never lost anything to "hackers", but I do like knowing theres nothing they can do if they have my password(which happened once).

I'm a fairly secure person, run a pretty solid anti virus routine, scanning every other day, have constant monitoring, and something still got past. They even spent $10 I had in itunes credit and changed my billing info >
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Posted: Aug 12th 2011 11:31AM (Unverified) said

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@FrostPaw

Authenticators only protect people from their own poor security practices.

You pay for them to keep the servers secure, not for them to stop you downloading key loggers
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Posted: Aug 12th 2011 10:49AM VikingGamer said

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The cost of using these authenticators is not in producing the authenticators themselves but in the licensing costs for the whole software system. Digipass with go 6 starts at a base price of about $100 a user and then goes down from there based on the volume of sales. They would have had to pony up a big chunk of cash up front to get their price down to the $10 range.

Posted: Aug 12th 2011 2:10PM Celtar said

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@VikingGamer

This was the very point I was trying to make earlier. The costs added to monthly operating costs for a gaming company for something like this do add up. And these things are mostly needed due to players doing something stupid, not the game developer.

Basically how can someone be critical of a game developer offering an added level of security for something that most of the time isn't their fault. Now SOE's case of course they were the faulty party, but look at most account security issues with say those playing WoW and you know that it is a player driven issue.

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Posted: Aug 12th 2011 11:01AM VikingGamer said

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My guess is that these companies are just trying to not loose money on setting this stuff up. Cost of the fobs in bulk. Bulk licensing of the software. System security time setting up and integrating everything. Programmer time to update the website to setup the fobs. updates to the store to sell them. Customer service time to process those orders and deal with problems. Sure, I guess they could make a small margin on selling these things if they really worked out it.

Or they could put an artist and a programmer on making a brand new stupid looking mount for the cash shop and make much much much more money in a fraction of the time. They are not selling security fobs to make money. They are selling/offering them to make their customers feel better so they retain them or get them back and they are just trying to not spend much or anything doing that.

There are better ways to make money than off these security fobs.

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