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Reader Comments (17)

Posted: Aug 10th 2011 6:27PM Turbana said

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Really like the Robo Rubi voice. Very intimidating.

Posted: Aug 10th 2011 6:45PM (Unverified) said

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Beau, your opinion about competitive raiding guilds and "the guld jerk", that whole segment made my day, brother. Thank you.

Posted: Aug 11th 2011 4:22AM Vazzaroth said

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@(Unverified)

Indeed. I would like him to write up a concise persuasive essay, I suppose, on the subject that could be easily circulated and linked around to raise people's awareness that behavior like we see in alot of online games today is indeed a real issue.
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Posted: Aug 10th 2011 7:06PM (Unverified) said

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You guys must be really passionate about GW2 to have been scrutinizing all the Sylvari details that much. Wow! :P

I'm glad Beau further explained his position on The Raid. I read your blog post on it and read that as an overreaction more than anything else. But after hearing your reasoning here on the podcast it made me reconsider a bit and see why the documentary was getting such flak.
At first I saw the people bemoaning it for its impact in the media as insecure and laying the blame on the wrong person. I know it wasn't the director's intent but yeah, he had such a narrow setting and cast of people that it painted the gaming environment in one light only, a seemingly negative one at that. Now I don't mind him showing this particular guild group, but it's important to those outside of the gaming circle that they understand even more about raiders and the many types of gamers out there.
I do hope the media doesn't use this as fuel for the fire against games and its effects on people. You could tell the director had good intentions and he tried to highlight that with some of the quick blurbs he included. But as is human nature, many will take away the bad parts with them after viewing "The Raid" and the good will be put on the back burner in their minds.

And a couple of quick comments on the podcast: Beau is like the traveler of MMO gamers. You play so many games! I'm more of a one game at time type of guy so that type of habit is so foreign to me. I've known you played many games for a while, but it still makes me amazed.

This was a really good episode, I found all the topics and discussions interesting. Thanks!

Posted: Aug 10th 2011 8:29PM Space Cobra said

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Well, my first episode to listen in on. Not bad!

Ironically, it's also the first time I listened to those .wav files in GW2 (I had to back-track and finally listen to the Charr). I pointed out, it may've been lack of context/reference, but yeah, I agree about the Brit accent. They need to do something else with nobility and it doesn't necessarily have to be an accent tied to a country.

As for Gold-Farming, I mentioned in the first article about how virtual currencies are coming into fashion; some are just "made up" and not tied to any game. Really, there is a considerable amount of people who will bet on anything: snail races, the exact time it may rain on a certain day, etc. But more importantly, such enterprises are a pretty easy way to move around money (and even launder it).

As for puppet-sex, believe it or not, South Park's "Team America" movie was not the first to show such stuff! And I won't link it; got to google it yourselves! ;P

Posted: Aug 10th 2011 10:14PM Kolrflikkr said

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I just listened to this new discussion and I think you guys are looking at things from a "different" angle.

1) You all "seem" to be "older" than the average COMPETITIVE raiding group. Thus you may not understand that these bosses are EXTREEEEMLY difficult!

2) The thing is that SOMEONE HAS to be first! There is always a first and the raiding group that was shown in the documentary is one of the top five raiding guilds in the game! So they have DO have a good chance of being FIRST. Thus the stress and frustration.

3) There are NOT a million good tanks, or healers, or dps! In fact, most are bad players and have no idea about how to play a perfect raid for 15 minutes straight.

4) I love you're show but you seem to know very little about the top 5% of raiding. Which is surprising considering I pretty sure you have played MMOs longer than I have ...

Thanks and keep up the good work.

Posted: Aug 10th 2011 10:16PM Kolrflikkr said

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@Kolrflikkr

Finally, in an MMO like WoW it is difficult to get even great players to act as one in order to be in the top percentile. Thus when herding cats it is sometimes effective to lead like a marine corps drill sergeant ... sometimes.

Thanks again
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Posted: Aug 16th 2011 4:08PM (Unverified) said

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@Kolrflikkr

1) High-end raiding is done by mostly adults and age specifically has nothing to do with their point of view in the show. They simply tried to demonstrate that the demographic represented in the documentary wasn't the only reality which the movie kinds clain to be.

2) Josh "Lore" Allen's guild is NOT one of the top 5 guilds in the game. The name of the guild is "Months behind" for a reason. So all that crap about being first was not even applicable to them.

3) see #2 and add that saying most are bad players is exactly the type of attitude that makes a bad player. A bad player is someone with whom it is not fun to PLAY.

4) again, these guys are not even remotely close to real competitve guilds which clearly show that you don't know anything about it either. Furthermore, the goal of editorial journalism is to try to see things in many angles.
Have a nice day.
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Posted: Aug 10th 2011 10:17PM Ehra said

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On the topic of the Sylvari voice acting, specifically the sound bit about the pet and the hairball, I think the main issue I had with that was that their discussion was about such a silly, mundane thing, yet it was supposed to be an example of how the Sylvari are all linked empathatically through sheer power of emotion. If I were to hear that particular discussion between NPCs while walking around a residential area then I don't think I'd have much issue with it, but I don't think it was a very good example of what the paragraph introducing it was conveying.

Posted: Aug 10th 2011 10:35PM Kolrflikkr said

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@Ehra

Well, I don't have a problem with the accents or the topic of the audio clips. When I read that the Sylvari were "Arthurian" I auto assumed british accents I guess.

And the cat coughing up a furball would probably distress a young Sylvari as much as it did to my ex-girlfriend who thought the cat was dieing! LOL!

All good from my viewpoint.

Thanks
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Posted: Aug 11th 2011 4:19AM Bolongo said

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@Ehra

Yeah, I agree. With both you and Rubi. :)
What I mean is, yes, when I first heard the clip it made me cringe as bad as Rubi describes. But part of the reason is probably that Arenanet has put that particular clip up on their site as one of only six sound bites that are supposed to define what this race is all about.
If I heard this as background chatter when walking through the game, I would just shrug it off. People have dumb conversations in real life too, I just tune them out. But as one of the prime examples of how Sylvari think and interact? Yeeesh...
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Posted: Aug 11th 2011 12:29AM BarGamer said

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If your Sylvari's name violates EULA or TOS, I would want those Sylvari to fall on their head and die, just because. DO IT, ANET!

Sylvari have breasts for the same reason they look human: So they can fit in.

Posted: Aug 11th 2011 2:19AM Kalec said

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The tree is not in the US either -_-

Why not british, this is not even english think of it like translating an alien language so you can understand it, maybe sylvari are snooty so they're british ?

Posted: Aug 11th 2011 4:30AM Vazzaroth said

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On the subject of goldfarming:

The only way we're going to significantly reduce this issue is live moderators and GMs. I work for a company that handles staffing of MMO worlds (So yes I am plugging my proffesion), and it has really opened my eyes to the effect mods and GMs can have on online games... and even more useful, the effects when they are not present.

Basically, it works like any kind of security works: You just want to present the image that your property/house/game is harder to break into/goldfarm/be a pedophile in than the other games, and it's not worth the effort. You can't stop these negative behaviors, but you can be sure they don't happen on your watch. A mod or 3 standing outside the town Shawn mentioned banning ever character that ran through with the obvious goldfarming character would be a great deterrent. Alerts of possible repeat farmers whenever an account generates a certain high number of gold per hour for a mod to review would be a good step. Responsive actions to player reports is the bare minimum companies will need to enact if this is as much of an issue as they keep claiming.

It comes down to how much they care. If they don't care enough to spend money to hire active countermeasures, the farmers WILL pick up and use their game for their affairs. If you make the life of a farmer hard, they will move to greener, easier pastures.

Posted: Aug 11th 2011 11:21AM Yarr said

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@Vazzaroth

One thing to keep in mind, at least in regards to Guild Wars 1, is that many legit players farm stuff all the time in GW. Elite Skill tomes, green boss weapons, or even crafting items often require farming to have any hope of getting them most of the time. Now, I'm sure I know which outpost Shawn and Rubi were talking about, especially with the stream of monks. But regular players also farm that area with monks too, players that aren't selling gold or doing anything questionable. So automated software certainly wouldn't work right in this situation (or for GW1 in general) and I would hope any GM would look at the player's actions in general before banning anyone. Especially with a company like NCSoft (they own ArenaNet & GW), which has a history of wrongfully banning people in Aion (and Lineage II as well, from what I've heard).

Just farming stuff shouldn't be used to ban someone, it really comes down to having well trained staff that are allowed to put the time into researching the accounts to track down any actual gold selling. I hope TERA will be relying on something more than automated software, although it does make sense to use software to flag 'potential' gold farmers for later investigation. But how many MMO companies are willing to have the added expense of trained people to control gold selling?
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Posted: Aug 11th 2011 3:28PM Vazzaroth said

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Right, that's why having the human touch is important. There's tons of times at my job where an offending user will make a new account, and we can usually tell within minutes it's the same person. Noticing trends and behaviors of problematic accounts is the most important skill.
Plus having a tool that allows you to see gold transactions of accounts is probably the easiest way to tell.

I've just noticed there's more and more devs openly complaining about the far reaching effects of gold farming, so I'm interested to see how much they actually care.
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Posted: Aug 14th 2011 7:08PM andar90 said

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I think I'm going to make a Sylvari character and name them Marquis de Salade.

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