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Reader Comments (22)

Posted: Jul 26th 2011 1:40PM (Unverified) said

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Minority Report- "In the future, criminals are caught before the crimes they commit, but one of the officers in the special unit is accused of one such crime and sets out to prove his innocence."

Get the Gold Sellers & Buyers!

Posted: Jul 26th 2011 1:44PM Unshra said

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Read this and the first thing that came to mind was "Ah they created a troll detector."

Posted: Jul 26th 2011 1:50PM Matix said

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So rather than take a GAME-centric approach and try to polish a game before bringing it to market or keep the content and gameplay fresh, this company takes the OPPOSITE route and focuses on perceived problems with PLAYERS?

I think looking at the players is only of benefit if the devs are willing to change the game to fit the players and not the other way around. Sadly, most developers would rather keep to their games' initial vision and try to pigeon-hole their players into it.

Still, I dunno. This NINJA thing has some promise. If in vanilla WOW Blizzard had reviewed the raiding vs. PVP numbers with an eye towards the player "getting the best gaming experience possible" we'd be looking at a VERY different World of Warcraft right now.

Posted: Jul 26th 2011 1:55PM ArtemisX said

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one of many, go look up Aquaint, now thats scary. http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/military/nsa-police.html

Posted: Jul 26th 2011 1:56PM Paradigm68 said

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I bet these studies result more in the form of marketing new services to players rather than actual improvements in development or gameplay.

Posted: Jul 26th 2011 2:02PM fallwind said

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from working inside the industry, I think this is a GREAT idea and could provide some very interesting data. Content can be streamed at a rate that will help retain players with more accuracy, players can be targeted with special incentives before they are lost ("We see you haven't been online lately, here's a 5-day potion that boosts X stat, enjoy!").

Heck, depending on how well their metrics work, you could possibly even ID key player trends, helping to prevent the loss of important players who provide content to others (thinking Eve here). The more ones game is focused on players influencing other players enjoyment, the more this kind of data could be important.

Posted: Jul 26th 2011 2:14PM Averice said

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@fallwind lol, I hope you're kidding.

When I see a game with cash shop potions to improve stats or xp gain, I don't go near it. IDK what part of the industry you're in, but pay to win is fail.

And it's already easy to prevent the loss of "important players". All you have to do is talk to them and let them know that their concerns are being heard. The fact that they're already putting so much time into this game tells you that they're big fans and aren't likely to up and leave at the drop of a hat.

On another note, I wonder if this w/e metric system will take into account seasonal activity. The story about the large group of Maple Story players from Minnesota really stuck in my mind, how they only play during the winter months and then when it's warm outside they go do other things. I wonder if gaming companies market more in the north during cold months in the US, it just makes sense, people need something to do while they're stuck inside.
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Posted: Jul 26th 2011 2:11PM The Ogre said

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Well, I can predict the exact moment an MMO will lose me as a customer: the instant I find out they've deployed this, or any similar, system.

Posted: Jul 26th 2011 2:26PM dudes said

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I don''t believe in psycho social so er phooey I stop playing at random chaotic times for the hell of it. Plus boredom.

Posted: Jul 26th 2011 2:42PM Dunraven said

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In three years I will attend University where I hope to eventually receive my doctorate in Software Engineering with a focus on Visualization programming, I can see research of this nature having huge benefits in future VR programming in regards to how AI reacts to participants. People that look at this as just some form of personal invasion aren't looking at the big picture.

Posted: Jul 26th 2011 7:25PM Graill440 said

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@Dunraven

very nice goals. I helped make the first VR lab in fort hood texas in 99-2002 with RTI (though not quite as fun as an MMO). Some of the software and tech you see today came from (military) RTI research and funneled down in todays civilian projects.
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Posted: Jul 26th 2011 7:26PM Graill440 said

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@Graill440

Slight adjustment, 99-2001 Fort knox, then fort hood.
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Posted: Jul 26th 2011 2:44PM Vgk said

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" identifies psycho-social motivations"
It may have a bit to do with something called "fun"

Posted: Jul 26th 2011 2:46PM Doran7 said

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fine, as long as they don't install anything on my computer.

Posted: Jul 26th 2011 4:07PM Rayko said

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I don't understand any of this....but I don't like it.

Posted: Jul 26th 2011 4:53PM Fabius Bile said

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World of Skinnerbox 2

Posted: Jul 26th 2011 5:23PM SnarlingWolf said

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It is just more metrics with more software analyzing the metrics. The problem with metrics is they can be driven by game design and not by what is good for players.

If you create an area that is utterly boring and awful, but has good rewards, you will see a lot of players using that area. They aren't having fun, and they will burn out and leave after a couple months of it, but at the same time they will force themselves to be there to maximize their gains.

There has been problems in the past were companies have offered up how their metrics show that although people complain about killtasks, their metrics show that people complete kill tasks more than anything else. This does not mean that players enjoy kill tasks. It also means you are likely losing players because they are getting bored of doing kill task after kill task. What it does mean is the kill task is giving them more rewards/faster than other quests so they are doing all the boring kill tasks.

Metrics can be a bad thing.

Posted: Jul 26th 2011 10:13PM ZenJitsu said

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@SnarlingWolf
I agree. I remember a few years back in City of Heroes, the thing to do was street sweep. It was just efficient to jump from mob to mob. Was it the most fun? Not really, but the rate of experience gain couldn't be argued with. Then they cut debt/defeat penalties in half for missions, as well as ramped up mission complete xp bonuses. All of a sudden, the streets were deserted.

Invasions fortunately brought people back out of the instanced rabbit holes that are missions and Task Forces, but you still see nowhere near as many people outside in the world as you used to. Of course, there are a lot more zones and content as well, so there's population scatter.
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Posted: Jul 26th 2011 5:53PM Issmir said

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I'm actually astounded by the suggestion that metrics like this aren't already being used. I always assumed they WERE.

And before a bunch of you jump down my throat, I never LIKED thinking that they were, but I figured these things are known about my web surfing and purchasing habits, these metrics are already available to the companies making my MMOs... why wouldn't they be using them.

For people not knowing what psycho-social is, relax. It's (roughly) a psychological theory that states we develop as people principally through our relationships with our peers. It's not a theory that turns people into psychos.

What psycho-social theory has to do with monitoring how people play MMOs is a little unclear to me, but hey, I'm neither a psychologist nor a statitician/

Posted: Jul 26th 2011 5:54PM Nyghtsaber said

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I'm dumb! I got the "1984" reference about halfway through the article but at first I thought, by the way you started the article that you were discussing a Research topic that literally started in 1984! Hehe.

I thought, "Wow. What kind of MMOG's were there in 1984?! Some rudimentary MUD's perhaps?" What an idiot I am. :D

Nice article nonetheless.

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