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Reader Comments (26)

Posted: Jun 1st 2011 10:11PM Faction 3 said

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Gotta admit, Matt Daniel makes a pretty goddamn good addition to the Massively.com staff, IMO.

Seriously though, I wish Mr. Sturrock the very best. May our prayers be with him.

Posted: Jun 1st 2011 10:43PM (Unverified) said

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We have a link to Jay's PayPal site at http://www.dc-mmo.org. We're working on a dedicated site for Jay, but this will have to do for now.

Thanks to everyone who has expressed their support and helped us out. Hopefully, I'll have a chance to thank you all in person at Dragon*Con.

-Grim (aka The Former Ask Massively Guy)

Posted: Jun 1st 2011 11:51PM (Unverified) said

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@(Unverified)

Grim,

Thanks for the update! I'll update the post with the PayPal link. And I personally will be attempting to make the drive up to Georgia for the weekend to show my support. :) Best of luck!

-Matt Daniel
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Posted: Jun 1st 2011 10:54PM (Unverified) said

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Tempes, I agree. It is wise to be cautious. You can see that the same link has been posted on the official Facebook page as cited in the article.

I would like to believe that nobody would sink as low as to use something like this to rip people off, but considering what I do for a living, I know better.

-Grim

Posted: Jun 1st 2011 11:26PM Locus said

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Here's the obvious question: How is playing a MMO obsessively and unhealthily for 24 hours going to help with cancer? Is this supposed to be the Terry Fox for the next millennium? (I understand that the cancer patient isn't even playing the even himself, so the allegory is vicarious, at best)

If someone enjoyed solo-stimulation and his friend had cancer, how would organising a masturbathon help? (I'm using the word in a purely non-sexual way)

Is there really such a dearth of possible publicity attracting stunts that someone with a MMO addiction can pull off or is there some deeper significance to playing World of Warcraft and his friend having cancer? Maybe you could cover yourself in eels instead or hold a car wash-a-thon or some other service actually likely to be useful to society (or at least more than playing a MMO for 24 hours and claiming that it isn't self-indulgence would be - unless you really and sincerely believe WoW is the hair-shirt of MMOs).

Posted: Jun 1st 2011 11:28PM Locus said

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Read "the cancer patient isn't even playing the game himself". Sorry.
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Posted: Jun 1st 2011 11:46PM (Unverified) said

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@Locus

Simple really. The people attending the fund raiser pledge a small amount per level gained... Similar to a walk-a-thon or some other "You agree to donate X amount per Y activity performed" type of activity.

I had assumed that most folks who couldn't physically make it to the event would not be interested in pledging, but if you are, I encourage you to do so. The PayPal link is for those who would rather give a flat amount.

If you'd rather do a long distance pledge, then feel free to contact me via the website and we'll set something up.

-Grim
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Posted: Jun 2nd 2011 3:55AM Locus said

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@Tempes Magus

You missed my point.

Jogging fundraising isn't equivalent marathon playing a MMO. One is injurious to your physical health and the other is gainful exercise (when not done in excess). It's perfectly in his rights to do it, I just think it's the wrong way of trying to get attention. Jogging to raise funds is fine, but not non-stop jogging for an entire day.

If my friend got cancer, I wouldn't chain smoke 200 cigarettes to raise funds for his recovery.

Change the methods and I'll contribute, but I'm not going to give you money if it involves self-injury.
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Posted: Jun 2nd 2011 12:11PM Krystalle Voecks said

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@Locus

Actually, there is quite a bit more to this than what is listed in the article. As someone who has both worked and gamed with Jay, and counts him among my very dear friends, I wanted to add in a bit more background.

Jay has been part of the Dragon*Con MMO track pretty much since before it even became an official track at the convention. Jay has directly helped Massively and our sister-site WoW Insider by volunteering enormous amounts of time creating WoW-themed games (Family Feud, Punt-A-Gnome, etc.), hand-made giveaway items, as well as assisting with crowd control and security at MMO track events at Dragon*Con. He's an incredibly hard-working guy, and truly exemplifies the "will give you the shirt off of his back" adage -- I've seen it happen, literally.

The idea of a WoW-a-thon was spun off from both the Desert Bus for Hope marathon (http://desertbus.org/) and the Extra Life marathon for charity held in the past. (http://massively.joystiq.com/2009/10/17/blogger-plays-games-and-heals-kids/) Additionally, as this is being run by many of us involved with the Dragon*Con MMO track, it seemed only fitting that we play Jay's favorite MMO -- the one where most of the Dragon*Con MMO staff have been in a guild together over the years -- World of Warcraft.

So, yes, there's a bit more significance to the marathon's choice of game and venue (Battle & Brew are friends and track sponsors), as well as for the group of us involved in organizing this.

I hope this helps.
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Posted: Jun 3rd 2011 3:12AM Locus said

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@Tempes Magus

Darling, one thing you'll have to learn when you grow up is that being good isn't the same thing as being *nice*. Sympathy is tacit, but expressing it is not particularly practical.

I'd rather have a single thoughtful offer of help than hundreds of servile condolences. Saying your heart "goes out to people" (this is the new catchphrase) does sod-all to help them.

@Krystalle

Thank you for your response. You provided quite a bit of important information that the article was frankly lacking. I still don't agree with the methods, but I'll contribute to the cause.
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Posted: Jun 3rd 2011 10:24AM Locus said

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@Tempes Magus

Way to gun for the moral high ground, dear. Hiding from issues doesn't make them go away. You've already formulated a very curious idea of myself and forced it unsolicited onto me; and nothing I say nor do will change this, so you may feel free to proceed with your vanglorious act of righteous indignation.

What you need, frankly, is a little less heart and a lot more brain.
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Posted: Jun 3rd 2011 10:52AM Locus said

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@Tempes Magus

Perhaps it'd take a longer post to get my point across:

Saying nice things doesn't solve a problem, nor make it go away. I have friends that occasionally do unwise things, and when they're about to indulge in activities that may be self-injurious, I consider it a responsibility as a friend to warn them of the possible consequences, rather than be a hollow sycophant. Likewise, I'd fully expect them to warn me when I act foolishly and do the same.

Rather than echo an essentially meaningless statement expressing regret for his current state of health (I've already said this is tacit. Did I delight in his personal tragedy? No. Does he know me? No. Would any grief I feel vicariously on his behalf be sincere? Probably not, it'd just be frankly disingenuous.) I'm not in a position to offer sympathy, and the act of offering shallow empathy would be frankly insultingly demeaning to his status as a person. The best I could do would be to donate to his cause

For your information, I've already devoted a large portion of my free time this year doing unpaid work for a Cancer society, so I'd need a stronger reason to show charity towards this particular individual. Most charity recipients aren't particularly grateful and find it frankly embarrassing to receive charity, and some of them actually do feel that having cancer makes them "Less of a person" and are therefore avoidant about it (other than taking your aid).

During the course of six months, we had all of ONE letter of thanks from over six hundred charity recipients assisted (I'm not at liberty to disclose more information, but consider that cancer patients here often have their spouses divorce them in order to avoid the responsibility of burgeoning medical bills.), and this in Singapore, a country where there is NO state-sponsored charity. Am I jaded towards charity as a result? Perhaps. Do I expect people to be grateful? No. But I can still help people while giving them their dignity and I believe it's far more sincere to do so with your hands than your lips.

I expressed concern for the health of the individuals about to engage in this Marathon WoW-session for a reason. There are usually prominent disclaimers about the deleterious effect of long periods of gaming for a reason and people have died from such incidents. I'd rather not see people get harmed for the express sake of sentimentality. There ARE alternative ways of garnering attention, I won't stop them from doing so, but I feel it my civic responsibility to state consequences of such behaviour. Now that I have done so, if they proceed to continue with their current course of action, I shall respect that decision as one of personal choice, but I'm not obliged to alter MY opinion about the folly of that act.
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Posted: Jun 4th 2011 1:54PM Locus said

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@Tempes Magus

Clearly, you have nothing to add to this discussion except for personal attacks on my character, so I cordially suggest you shut up instead of trying to judge me when you have absolutely no right to do so.

I'm not even going to respond in kind, because frankly, it's beneath me.
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Posted: Jun 4th 2011 3:41PM Locus said

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@Tempes Magus

This is completely irrelevant, but I'd like to just state pro bono (this frankly bugs me more than your psychotic ad hominem attacks) that your name REALLY annoys me because it appears excessively illiterate. If you're going to try to make up a pretentious moniker in Latin, at least do it -properly-

1)"Tempes" is not a valid declension of "Tempus" in any way and isn't even a Latin word. Assuming you're using it as a form of "Time", you should be using the genitive form and therefore it should be "Temporis".

2) Although Latin is pretty forgiving with regard to word placement, tradition is to put the modifier after the subject, thus "Magus Temporis".

3) Even assuming you're using French, which is the only language I can think of with the word "Tempes", it's a PLURAL. And in French, modifiers also come after the subject noun.
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Posted: Jun 5th 2011 6:41AM Locus said

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@Tempes Magus

I have to admit, since you're completely incapable of ever admitting personal error, I was eagerly awaiting what bizarre explanation you had for your illiterate name.

You've really outdone yourself.

(By the way, the word "Locus" is perfectly good English and carries a meaning I don't expect you to understand. It's a shame your vocabulary doesn't match up to your self-righteousness nor hypocrisy.)
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Posted: Jun 1st 2011 11:54PM (Unverified) said

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And how the heck do I get rid of (Unverified)?

-Grim

Posted: Jun 2nd 2011 12:01AM (Unverified) said

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@Tempes Magus

I'm guessing that it doesn't go back and fix old comments?

-Grim
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Posted: Jun 2nd 2011 2:43AM Xpress0 said

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@Tempes Magus

"A bit of a mess" is correct.
The coders of the backend have a guaranteed place in some special level of coder hell - for a commercial software, it's spectacularly crappy.

Things like updating your password, getting your username "verified" and more generally commenting on things still seem to work sporadically at best.. and the site re-make was what.. 6 months ago?

The big scandal of the visual site design (the horrible white theme) is actually really minor frustration compared to the mess that is commenting/account handling.

This is my third account here, the rest have "disappeared" and seem to be impossible to recover. I've send mails to massively through the contact form, but never even received an acknowledgement of them having been received - I'm guessing the software just silently loses them in some bitbucket.

Great site, spoiled by really, really bad software.
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Posted: Jun 2nd 2011 12:16AM ShivanSwordsman said

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I wish this man the best, though when I read the article, I expected he'd be using the money for a charity. I can, however, see why he'd go this route. Unfortunately, the medical system has gone as far as it can so that normal people simply can't use Hospital Services anymore, you either need to be rich, or had a spouse pass on that had amassed money over several years.

Non-profit organization my foot...

Posted: Jun 2nd 2011 12:48AM Tristik said

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~~
Best of luck to him, both physically and financially. I know how bad cancer treatment can cripple you, even if you survive it. About a decade ago, a family member went through treatment and beat breast cancer (for now, it often comes back), and she's still got debt from it in the 5 digit range.
~~

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