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Reader Comments (23)

Posted: May 10th 2011 9:09AM Yellowdancer said

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I think at this point we've gone from beating a dead horse to beating glue.

Posted: May 10th 2011 9:21AM Beau Hindman said

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@Yellowdancer There are always more people out there who do not know about this information. Remember, a lot of our readers here at Massively are probably pretty keyed-in to technology and the internet, but I will promise that nowhere near all of them know a good amount about internet security.

Take the debit card advice -- I'll guarantee a good many people haven't heard that before. It's no dead horse.

Beau
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Posted: May 10th 2011 10:08AM MrGutts said

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@Beau Hindman

Don't forget all the people who live in denial about things like this.

Oh this will never happen to me!
Oh hacking is not real, it's just made up for marketing!
Oh Sony or Microsoft will never be hacked!
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Posted: May 11th 2011 3:01AM Graill440 said

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@Beau Hindman

Mr Hindman is dead on, one would think reading about this that the no brainer attitude is prevelant, instead i see with my own relatives how clueless people actually are in regards to security.

I started getting emails from my sister inlaws father, whom never, ever emails me, suddenly i am getting one every few minutes. naturally i qurantine and delete them, contact the inlaw and let her know there is a problem, the end result? The father had a ton of bs viruses and keyloggers etc on his computer, one he used for their side of the families finance and banking, as bad as it was i wiped the drive. The lesson learned, most likely none as he simply laughed the whole time i was fixing his machine, totally clueless.

I have others just as dense. sad.
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Posted: May 10th 2011 9:15AM dacool561 said

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The advice is good, but I wouldn't trust this company's service. http://consumerist.com/2010/05/after-posting-ss-in-ads-lifelock-ceos-identity-stolen-13-times.html

Granted it was his fault for plaster his SSN all around, but it doesn't seem like Life Lock managed to do anything for him.

Posted: May 10th 2011 9:25AM Beau Hindman said

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@dacool561 I have read about some of his ID issues, as well. Some of them were from smaller services who would not need to verify his ID with a credit check anyway (smaller loan amounts, under 500 dollars.)

The service, as with any credit service, is no guarantee that the actual, physical event of someone attempting to steal your ID will not happen. It is a guarantee that you can recover from it, in an all-in-one service.

You can do all of these things for yourself, but the service is for those who do not want to or do not know how. Sorry, just wanna' clarify some stuff, in case people want to look into a service. :)

Beau
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Posted: May 10th 2011 9:29AM Pewpdaddy said

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@dacool561
I bet he still made/makes a truckload. If you can prove your identity was stolen, 9x out of 10 your not held liable for the damage caused. Yes everything gets wonky for a month or two maybe longer. But as long as you've got a brain you can save yourself their monthly stipend. Perhaps my last sentence answers for the folks who do prefer this service......
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Posted: May 10th 2011 9:37AM Yellowdancer said

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@Beau Hindman

And the troll in me wants to make a quip about beating live horses and animal abuse. But I held it in. Sorta. :)
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Posted: May 10th 2011 9:35AM Pewpdaddy said

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Also, just as an aside. Do we really need to fire up the propaganda engine? Yes, stuff gets stolen. There are institutions in place just like the Police to help safe guard you(FDIC, other Law Enforcement). And your already paying for their service, why buy another?

Posted: May 10th 2011 2:44PM pcgneurotic said

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@Pewpdaddy

You wanna file a police report that someone stole your myspace/WoW login? They'll laugh their heads off.
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Posted: May 10th 2011 9:39AM Suhaira said

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There are people out there who finally take notice of a web address and think https means its a phishing site.
Seriously. There are a lot of uninformed people getting on the web nowadays.

Posted: May 10th 2011 9:56AM Jergis said

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""Third, never shop with a debit card online. This provides direct access to your bank account and doesn't provide the same protections as credit cards.""

-Well this just isn't true. Many debit cards bear a visa or mastercard logo on them. These are designed to provide the same access and protection as a credit card, and indeed function the same way and have the same state and federal guidelines associated with them.

There's more to this article that just isn't complete information (not massively's fault), anyone truly interested in the topic should do their own research, and more than this article provides.

Good journey to you.

Jergis

Posted: May 10th 2011 10:18AM aurickle said

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@Jergis
Actually, the Visa or MasterCard protection ONLY kicks in if you have signed a receipt. For example, if you're in Target and make a purchase where you run it as debit and even get cash back, you will not have the credit card company's backing. If you run it as credit instead (so that you have to sign a receipt), you do.

Whether that applies to an online purchase I am not sure. With an online purchase you are not signing anything so there's a real possibility that the credit card company won't back the purchase. If this is a concern for you, it would be wise to check with your card issuer.
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Posted: May 10th 2011 10:57AM Jergis said

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@aurickle

You are correct that a signature is needed to route it through the credit network. However, Visa and Mastercard provide no liability refunds on fraudulent transactions using the same model and reporting timeframes as the federal law requires for credit cards. Very similar coverage. On the legal side, it's Reg E in federal code that governs debit cards. If given the choice, use it as a credit card.

As for online, vis and mastercard default to showing those transactions as credit card purchases. Same for transactions under $25 where many vendors do not ask for nor require a signature.

As i indicated, this article leaves many things out and the person giving the interview is not clear on a number of points. Due to the small amount of space given, i recommend folks research for themselves.

Jergis
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Posted: May 10th 2011 1:09PM (Unverified) said

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@Jergis You're mostly correct regarding how debit cards work, but a signature is *not* required to route a transaction through a credit card network. A better rule of thumb is that any transaction where you *don't* enter a PIN will be processed as a credit card transaction, and is therefore covered under Visa or MasterCard's fraud policy. Signatures merely serve ad protection for the retailer against future chargebacks.

In general, you should never enter your PIN unless you expect to receive cash back.

Also: why is Massively treating LifeLock like its a legitimate credit protection service? Assuming I understand how it works, it's like having a home security company that just spans fake 911 calls to your house instead of installing alarms.
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Posted: May 10th 2011 10:42AM (Unverified) said

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Somehow I don''t think this person/company is being completely honest or if they are they don''t know all the facts.


Lets take a simple example that I found your wallet and it has both your CC and you DC in it.Now I don''t know how badly DC work over in America, but over here in EU if you have the DC its worthless without the pin number.

Sure its not a great feeling knowing that someone has your DC but as long as you didn't write the pin down on a paper on the wallet your pretty safe, unless they get lucky on the first 3 tries guessing your password, before the DC gets blocked

And if you wanted to shop online with your DC you couldn't unless you had the paper you get from the bank with about 50 four digit numbers which each time you want to use the DC online it asks you for one line which corresponds to the required four digit number you need.

And let''s say you were stupid enough to write the pin on a piece of paper that you put inside your wallet behind the DC or that you just picked up the sheet of paper with all the numbers on them which you just put into your wallet until you got home.Even if that was the case the great thing about a DC is, that you can only spend what you have on it.

For most people that's only gonna be what they just earned the last month, minus whatever gets charged as soon as you have the money, like rent,electricity,water etc, so while it would be horrible to lose your DC with pin, its not going to be as painful as having a 5K/10K debt because you lost your CC unless you happen to have that amount in your DC account the moment it got stolen.


While I know that CC by simply being CC has a lot of security and safeguards, that does not mean that a DC is as simply as opening a pack of chocolates


Posted: May 10th 2011 11:59AM jslim419 said

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@(Unverified)

in THE GREATEST COUNTRY IN THE UNIVERSE USA... a debit card can be used just like a credit card unless you are using it at an atm, or like a grocery store. no pin needed otherwise.
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Posted: May 10th 2011 4:29PM Interitus said

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@jslim419

Really? They just swipe it? No pin? In Canada, even if I'm spending $2 on a debit purchase I still have to type in my pin. And that's everywhere from 7-11 to Best Buy.
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Posted: May 10th 2011 12:10PM (Unverified) said

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So..... basically, USA chooses to have less security, well no wonder CC looks so great over there. In that case I hope CC never becomes as wide spread over here as it is in the USA.

Posted: May 10th 2011 1:47PM shiningfury said

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LifeLock has a pretty shady reputation (check out the Wikipedia entry). In particular, the company has been fined $12 million by the Federal Trade Commission regarding false claims about identity theft prevention and data security.

Relevant link: http://www.ftc.gov/opa/2010/03/lifelock.shtm

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