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Reader Comments (27)

Posted: Apr 28th 2011 8:58PM Yog said

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That first answer you gave for the first question was lame and actually proved the point of the questioner...should have left it out. The second one made sense.

Posted: Apr 28th 2011 9:24PM Paradigm68 said

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You should know that the word acronym refers only when the letters are pronounced as a word. So P.I.N. pronounced as 'pin' is an acronym. ATM said as the letters "A" "T" "M" isn't an acronym, its just initials.

Posted: Apr 29th 2011 8:59AM ColRoofles said

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@Paradigm68 Uh, no. How do you pronounce ATM without spelling each letter separately? How about CD, DNA, BBC, USA? Acronyms are simply abbreviations formed from the _initial_ letters in a name, phrase or whatever. Whether you pronounce them as words or as the names of letters is irrelevant.
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Posted: Apr 29th 2011 9:55AM Paradigm68 said

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@ColRoofles Uh, yes. An acronym is a set of initials pronounceable as a word. If the initials are not pronounceable as a word then they are not an acronym, they are just initials. ATM, CIA, FBI, CD are initials. PIN, NATO, AWOL are acronyms.

http://www.thefreedictionary.com/acronym
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Posted: Apr 29th 2011 9:56AM Jenks said

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@ColRoofles

He's right, and you're wrong.

I like when people use the snarky "uh, no" only to follow it with something completely ignorant.
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Posted: Apr 29th 2011 2:25PM ColRoofles said

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@Jenks Uh, no. It seems we were both right.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acronim#Nomenclature

Thanks for contributing anyway, Jenks.
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Posted: Apr 29th 2011 2:59PM Paradigm68 said

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@ColRoofles No. I was right. My definition is the correct definition of the word acronym.
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Posted: Apr 29th 2011 3:46PM sorbon said

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@Paradigm68 No, you took a hard stance on a topic that is debated. That's called having an opinion, not being right.

While you're busy looking up "acronym" and "opinion," you may want to check out the difference between "descriptive" and "prescriptive" in terms of lexicon and grammar as well. In the real world, "descriptive" always trumps "prescriptive," and just to summarize, for you, a massively complex system and how it relates to this discussion in 5 simple words: "what you said was wrong."
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Posted: Apr 29th 2011 3:47PM sorbon said

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@Jenks I like when someone accuses another of being ignorant, when they showed they didn't even take 15 seconds to Google the topic and see just how ignorant they themselves were in the first place.
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Posted: Apr 29th 2011 6:35PM Jenks said

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@ColRoofles

Protip: use the dictionary for definitions, not wikipedia.

Uh, ignorant.
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Posted: Apr 30th 2011 8:48AM ColRoofles said

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@Jenks

Protip: be less of an unamusing troll and try adding something worthwhile to the discussion once in a while.

Uh, ColRoofles.
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Posted: Apr 28th 2011 9:47PM Pitt said

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i also use atm in mmo's for "at the moment" :)

Posted: Apr 28th 2011 10:22PM (Unverified) said

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When you justify the subscription fee because the developers need to be paid for the patches/updates they are working on continuously, how come we have to pay separately for the expansions and don't even get a free month with it? From Jan/Feb to December, there wasn't much content updates to pay for, I still paid $15 every month, then paid again for Cataclysm expansion, and $15 for the month of December. I think that was stupid.

Posted: Apr 28th 2011 11:58PM tmarg said

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@(Unverified)

He never said that the business model was tied to development costs. In all honesty, MMO development could be funded for MUCH less than what companies are currently charging. Pricing is dictated by maximizing profit, the same as with every other publicly traded company. Simply stated, they charge that much because you are willing to pay it.

This is why it's annoying when, whenever faced with a new sleazy marketing scheme, people instantly defend them with arguments like "this will pay for new content" or "they have to make profit somehow". Companies are already making a profit, or else they wouldn't be operating the game at all, and it's their responsibility to reinvest that profit back into the game if they want their success to continue. Buying into their latest cheesy scheme actually encourages companies to be lazy, because it shows them that they don't have to improve their product in order to be more successful financially.
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Posted: Apr 29th 2011 6:30AM (Unverified) said

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@tmarg
By "you" I was referring to the gaming companies. Loved reading the rest of your comment.
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Posted: Apr 29th 2011 2:58AM pcgneurotic said

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I think you're being a little too hard on "PIN number" as a whole phrase. It's still common to hear it around Britain and Europe, and it seems to me that dropping the word 'number' is simply the American tendancy towards verbal reduction. Seems to me that it's a difference between spoken English and written English; when speaking the phrase aloud, some old bat in the store could get confused if you asked her just for a 'pin' (you can't hear the capitals when you say it). Trust me, my mother in law gets confused just looking in her purse for her card, let alone punching in her PIN. :D

(apologies for the pedantry, it's my job to analyse this stuff and I can't help myself. :D)

Posted: Apr 29th 2011 3:21AM tmarg said

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@pcgneurotic

I hate when people say "ATM machine", but I agree that he might have been a bit too hard on "PIN number", mostly because "pin" is already a word that has a different meaning, and as such it really isn't a great stand alone acronym.
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Posted: Apr 29th 2011 3:37AM pcgneurotic said

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@tmarg

I'm not a big fan of 'ATM' myself tbh - I remember when the things first appeared and I thought ATM was just too much - 'Another acronym? Bleh'. In Britain they call them 'cash machines', and here in Poland (and possibly other Slavic countries too, with some variation), they're 'bankomats', which I love. It sounds sort of Clockwork Orange-y, and the '-o-mat' on the end makes it sound like some crazy, automatic money machine (which it kind of is, I guess). :D
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Posted: Apr 29th 2011 7:40AM Bramen said

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@pcgneurotic
It is not uncommon to say "Pin Number" in the USA either. It is done for clarity. Are we talking about a P.I.N. or a pen or a pin? To clear things up its been a habit of the majority to say "pin number."
Eliot was just trying to be funny.
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Posted: Apr 29th 2011 5:38AM Bhagpuss said

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As a bookseller I have to ask many people every day to put their card in the machine and enter the number. It's hard enough to get some people to understand what's required of them even when it's stated in non-acronymic English like that. To expect them to understand "PIN" without the addition of the clarifying "number", tautologous though it may be, would be counterproductive, as I'd then have to explain the acronym, thereby losing far more time than I would have saved by not simply saying "Personal Indentification Number" in the first place.

It's also extremely rude to insist on pedantic accuracy when talking to people who don't express themselves exactly as you wish they would. Good manners are always far more important than good grammar.

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