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Reader Comments (65)

Posted: Apr 24th 2011 4:57AM Wayshuba said

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I have to agree here.

When devs are running things on test servers that receive these kind of negative reactions they still go live.Why? Because the sees testors as a minority.

Then it goes live and many people come to the forum and provide feedback and the company, through future updates or actions, shows it is oblivous to that feedback. Why? Because forum posters are a minority.

Then, subs start going way down so radical changes are made to the game infrastructure to try and capture new players or suck as many dollars as possible from the existing players. There is a short term boost and then players start leaving in droves again. Why? Because of failure to really listen to a player base, not doing your homework and ignoring that minority that gave you feedback as your first warning signs. This is part of the homework and I see it ignored more than acted upon.

Too many MMOs today comply perfectly with Einstein's comment, "The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting a different result." Failing is only failing is the company learns from it. In the case of one of them above, I haven't seen it for over two years.

Posted: Apr 24th 2011 9:32AM cray said

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As long as there's something learned...risk is worth it.

Posted: Apr 24th 2011 12:47PM UnSub said

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As a player, I have little downside if a company tries and fails and upside if they try and succeed.

If failure means that the entire company is shut down and everyone fired, it means little to me in direct terms. Maybe I won't get to play a MMO any more; oh well, there are lots of other games out there.

As such, the above question is loaded in the player's favour, so of course a lot of players will answer it favourably. However, people should try to look at it from a different viewpoint: does thinking that companies should try and possibly fail mean that SOE was correct in at least attempting the NGE?

Posted: Apr 24th 2011 2:13PM Alfrodul said

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The LOTRO grindfest has one of two origins, malice or incompetence.

As a player, I don't want to believe it's malice (in retaliation against player reaction to the Update 2 grind, the Radiance grind, the LI grind, etc.).

That really only leaves incompetence.

LOTRO has an active and involved playerbase that loves fluff and cosmetics. Many of their subscribers are involved with special events for the sole reason of collecting all of the cosmetic and decorative barter items. Players who want one, typically want them all. In all previous festivals, it has been easy to casually play the game and *when not doing anything else* join in on the festival activities and get enough tokens to get everything you wanted.

Anyone with any experience in LOTRO and its festivals should have expected that anyone taking any part in the festivals would expect that they would be able to play casually and by the end of the festival collect enough tokens to get one of each of the things they wanted.

Just like every other festival in the past four years.

But with this festival, if you do the math, you discover that it takes nearly 49 hours of playing the beer brawl just to get one of each item. And because the items are of similar style and quality, players who want one are that much more likely to want the complete set. Especially since the main decoration, the maps, *are a set.* But that is 3-4 hours per day, every day for two weeks if you never loose a beer brawl. That's more time than any of the players I know play in game, total, right now.

It doesn't take experience in systems, content, world building, community management, UX, IA, QA, or any other low-to-mid-level department to see that this even was doomed to colossal failure, community unrest and disappointed fans. It takes a basic understanding of fifth grade math.

Posted: Apr 25th 2011 12:30PM Space Cobra said

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I am all for it, but I do miss the small events that deal one-on-one or with small groups.

I know Massively Multi-Player Games are probably not the best place for such things and if not done well, GMs can be tossed out based on TOS, but I do prefer those type of things, even though some may consider them "unfair" because they didn't participate in them.

It's just nice to see more personal things given to a community or well-thought out events, even though the large scale events can be good.

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