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Reader Comments (65)

Posted: Apr 23rd 2011 1:15PM (Unverified) said

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@Germaximus

Wrong, Trion has arguably the worst customer service in the business right now. Ask on the forums, where people are still waiting on tickets that are weeks old, where there is plenty of evidence that GM's are not properly trained ( when they do bother to respond ), and where their phone support ( a call center in INDIA for God's sake ) is a dismal joke.
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Posted: Apr 23rd 2011 5:11PM Samuraiko said

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Personally, I'd rather they take their best shot and fail than not try at all. HOWEVER, if they realize that their attempt would go drastically wrong, a simple notice to the playerbase along the lines of the following would never be amiss:

"Hey guys, we want you to know. We've been investigating X problem/considering Y event/tinkering with Z powerset, but we found that as a result, it horrendously unbalances A/would cause routine crashing for folks with B video cards/etc/etc/etc. So for now, it's on hold until we can manage it without said issue."

But that's my two inf.

Posted: Apr 23rd 2011 12:42PM Dblade said

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So, how many people are playing FFXIV now? If we are talking about trying and failing.

Posted: Apr 23rd 2011 12:53PM Pingles said

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I think we may be losing sight of the issue.

I'm not a code writer.
I'm not a Network specialist.
I'm not a Game Producer.

The people at Trion and Turbine ARE those people. That is what they are paid for. I don't see anything described that they should not have anticipated.

What we SHOULD be asking is:

1. How in the world did Trion set up such an enormous event and not understand how it would tax their systems? Did they REALLY think only a small percentage of players would take part? Isn't it crazy to think that they would go through that expense thinking only a few people would be there?

2. How did Turbine not know how much grinding was involved with their new event? Don't the producers look over what it would take to accomplish what they set up?

These failures point at perhaps one hand not knowing what the other is doing when they elaborately promote ill-designed events.

This isn't trying and failing. This is failing to do your homework.

Posted: Apr 23rd 2011 1:09PM RavenCries said

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@Pingles

By your own admission, you are not a code writer, network specialist or game producer, which makes:

"This isn't trying and failing. This is failing to do your homework."

a bit dubious a statement to make.

It is perfectly possible, and from the sound of it, very likely that they did not know how their system would react (http://massively.joystiq.com/2011/04/10/cnn-looks-at-rifts-server-technology/2).

"The people at Trion and Turbine ARE those people. That is what they are paid for. I don't see anything described that they should not have anticipated."

Hindsight is 20/20.
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Posted: Apr 23rd 2011 1:01PM Valkesh said

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Short answer to topic, hell yes. I'd rather play a game that tried interesting and risky things to keep the experience fresh and keep the genre from stagnating than play a game where they just play it safe and reinforce the same tired mechanics/races/skills/etc just to secure subscriber money. No question.

Posted: Apr 23rd 2011 1:09PM (Unverified) said

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It is most definitely better to try and fail..........on the Test server.

Trions event DID fail on the Test server, yet they brought it to Live anyway.

That is where they were wrong. As a paying customer, I have no right to complain about something as long as it is sitting on that Test server, other than to provide a thought of what may or may no be a good idea.

But I have every right complain about what is released into the Live environment, especially when it was already a proven failure on that Test server.

Posted: Apr 23rd 2011 1:11PM (Unverified) said

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@(Unverified)

I actually forgot to mention that it not only failed on Test server, but also failed the first time they did it on Live, which is why they extended the event only to have it fail once again.
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Posted: Apr 23rd 2011 1:57PM Rialle said

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@(Unverified)

The event did not "fail" on live the way it "failed" on the test server. It seems the biggest failings of the World Event were logistical and not truly technical.

But at least they tried a world event that was something more than your boring, unoriginal "holiday."
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Posted: Apr 23rd 2011 1:21PM Sharuk said

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This is exactly why I am a fan of Trion and Rift, they take risks and if it fails so be it. They will change things and learn from their mistakes.

I love the game play aspects including tower defense world events coming in 1.2.

Posted: Apr 23rd 2011 8:18PM (Unverified) said

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@Sharuk

Trion takes risks? Really? Is that way Rift is a carbon copy of WoW, EQ and WAR? If anything, they take the least amount of risks of any developer.

The event had issues because of logistics. There was nothing new about live events. It happens on other games too. So we should all accept the fact that Trion doesn't like taking any risk and basically modifiying existing game mechanics...like Blizzard. Good or bad, that's what they are.
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Posted: Apr 23rd 2011 2:04PM Haldurson said

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We had a saying where I used to work -- the only people who never fail are those who never try.

I don't think that rational people are going to ragequit over one mistake. Rational people don't ragequit -- they quit when they are bored, or no longer love the game.

Irrational rage about these kinds of things is actually a positive sign, not a negative, and it indicates that the game is FAR from dying -- here's why: people who don't love a game, do not get so emotional about it that go on rants and have fits about mistakes. People who don't love a game, simply quit. You can't hate something, truly hate it, unless you've gotten emotionally involved with it first. So a few irrational people ragequitting doesn't mean much, but a bunch, is actually a great sign for a game, because it proves that, for the most part, the devs are doing something right.


Posted: Apr 23rd 2011 2:06PM (Unverified) said

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The "consolation prize" that Trion handed out was far above what I would have asked for. Every alt that I had at the time of the event got the title and the other goodies. I hopped around from server to server at head start due to queues and ended up with 20 characters. My secondary server's main character even got the ghostly pony.

I doubt any other developer would have done as much as Trion did.

Posted: Apr 23rd 2011 2:15PM oxlar said

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It was more than just 'several' players that missed out on the event.

The status of the servers say pop is high. Queues are present. Then when you get on, its dead everywhere. Nothing in chat. Can't get groups for dungeons together all day and even primetime. The only thing I can think of is that their server technology is a lie. I'm thinking that maybe they can't really handle large numbers over the entire server. Its great for when they are crammed into one area, but when there are a lot of people on the entire server, its not so great. So I think their servers don't do well with high pops like some other games and are kept at low caps.

Posted: Apr 23rd 2011 4:13PM winterborn said

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Try out stuff on your own dime not your customers.

Get it right and then offer it to them, not just shove it at them in desperation for something new.

Sorry but Trion screwed the pooch with that last event, or what they call the content you are paying for.

Posted: Apr 23rd 2011 5:15PM Graill440 said

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In order to make failure mean something there first needs to be and original idea behind the mechanism. Testing a brand new idea and having it fail leads to innovation, new products, improvements, etc.

Trion has nothing to stand on other than *possibly* poor coding, bad hardware, or any number reasons they wont truthfully release. As stated the title is based on old tech and old ideas in a new wrapper, nothing to experiment and nothing that has been improved, just nifty ideas crowded together.

The event failure, reading from the outside, is just that, a poorly planned and executed fiasco that was shoved in place to try and hold subscriptions, and they failed miserably in their service execution. In order to fail and learn you need a good plan in the first place. When you knowingly rush something, and they did from their own admission, you see the result, no learning experience when you know your going to screw up.

Posted: Apr 23rd 2011 7:26PM (Unverified) said

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Well honestly, when you say "we as a community" its a little misleading. Yet, most devs have no clue whats going on in reality.

See, the "mmo community" is really about 1% or less of mmo players. The other 99% are busy PLAYING the game and dont spend much time if any on the forums and barely any on mmo and gaming website. The "vocal minority" of players, chock full of the infamouse whiners, spoiled brats and jaded, burnt-out rushers are the "mmo community" you speak of.

Once the devs ZFINALLY realize that the other 99% of players are happy with most of what they do, then theyll start getting more done knowing the have an appreciative playerbase, rather than a whiney, complaining, dissecting community of players that dont really matter at all.

A lot of you are cool and arent the bad ones, but a large majority of that .001% - 1% shouldnt even be playing these mmos they so blatently and publicly despise.

MMOs would be better off if once a year there was a survey for ALL account holders, instead of devs ONLY listening to the vocal MINORITY/

It happened to WAR, happening to WOW too and some others like CO and EQ2

remember the mmo community has around 15-20 millions current players, yet there are over 600million people with computers waiting for a dev to wake up and promote their game to THEM - then we'll have fresh, non-QQing blood to join our ranks.
gl all and happy EASTE!

- Xaos

S!

Posted: Apr 23rd 2011 9:55PM Streamweaver said

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It's fine to try and fail. All businesses have to try and like all businesses they need to succeed at most of what they try if they want their business to succeed. Sure RIFT is a good game. I play it but they set out to differentiate themselves from WoW and if they want to be more than a slightly streamlined version of WoW then they'll need to start succeeding at these events. In the case of RIFT I think they will eventually succeed.

Posted: Apr 24th 2011 3:04AM Montaugh said

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I think that developers should try and do new things, but they need to do it within reason and when something doesn't work either fix it within a reasonable amount of time so that it does work or remove the feature and admit defeat. Nothing will annoy players, and give disgruntled players fodder to use against the company like half compeleted/implimented/ignored features do.

Posted: Apr 24th 2011 4:46AM Wayshuba said

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It is better to try and fail, IF you learn something from that failure.

While I can't soeak for RIFT, I can for LOTRO. While the Anniversary does have many up in arms it is, for many, because it came on the heels of the 10x grind for armor added in Update 2. Like the Anniversary, many players expressed their disappointment on this.

When players respond to something negatively, it is best to fess up, fix the situation and learn from it. In the case above, it was instead met with it is "working as intended", and we aren't going to fix it.

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