| Mail |
You might also like: WoW Insider, Joystiq, and more

Reader Comments (3)

Posted: Apr 15th 2011 2:01PM (Unverified) said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
"It's almost an unwritten rule of game development that someone from quality assurance should never be promoted into a game design role." - this is almost entirely untrue. Many people will tell you that the best way to get into the industry is to start in QA and work your way up from there. I myself can attest to this, though I went from QA to Engineering.

Posted: Apr 15th 2011 5:03PM (Unverified) said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
Yeah, I don't know where you get your information, but

"It's almost an unwritten rule of game development that someone from quality assurance should never be promoted into a game design role."

That is complete BS. A lot of the skills learned from QA are vital for creating compelling Design, in fact, in a lot of start-up studios, Designers take up the role of QA due to not having access to an internal or external specialized department.

In fact, the kind of Designers that aren't trained in systematic problem solving, and know how to find bugs, are the kind who spout Games being "art" and Designers having to be exclusively "creative".

Newsflash folks. Developing games is a Software Industry, not an Art one, in terms of processes. Designers need to be on par with the organization and efficiency of Software Engineers, or else their designs are going to get horribly implemented cause they don't know how to do their actual jobs.

Posted: Apr 15th 2011 5:50PM Brendan Drain said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
@(Unverified) I think that's an interesting take on it, because as far as I'm aware CCP actually does use separate game design and engineering roles. They have people whose sole job is conceptual game design, others whose sole job is programming and systems design and others whose sole job is QA. Those people cooperate on features as part of scrum teams, but their individual roles are specialised.

From what I gather, CCP's game designers do sometimes come up with ideas that for one reason or another are not technically feasible or would cause problems, and the feature programmers and QA people on their teams are responsible for working those issues out with them. In that sense, CCP's game designers do seem to be largely creative types rather than system designers.

Another complicating factor is what goes into a QA department. QA engineering and technical roles are completely different to QA testing, for example. While a technical QA role would prepare someone well for pre-emptively identifying flaws in a game design prototypes (and thus help them if they went on to become a game designer), the same can't really be said of testing. Someone being good at following testing instructions and writing up reports does not automatically imply anything about their ability to design gameplay mechanics or even come up with compelling ideas.
Reply

Featured Stories

Engadget

Engadget

Joystiq

Joystiq

WoW Insider

WoW

TUAW

TUAW