| Mail |
You might also like: WoW Insider, Joystiq, and more

Reader Comments (77)

Posted: Mar 27th 2011 8:48PM Tovrin said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
@Mystal Actually Hollywood has already tried to take on ISPs in Australia over internet piracy. Just google "AFACT vs iiNet". I wouldn't be surprised if they tried it over in Canada as the their court case failed over here.
Reply

Posted: Mar 27th 2011 9:29AM Joshua Przygocki said

  • 3 hearts
  • Report
The true WoW killer.

Posted: Mar 27th 2011 9:36AM Beau Hindman said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
I'm thinking this has more to do with the fact that bandwidth does not grow on trees. It is very likely that we will see this happening to more and more applications and companies as the systems in place struggle to catch up to the ever-increasing use of video and other things.

Think about how many people use video on their mobile devices now, compared to even just two years ago. It's insane. It's also amazing that we can even do what we do in MMO gaming, using what some might consider "unfair amounts" of bandwidth to participate in our hobby for hours a day. Once the "normal" cable customer figures out that some people are using tons of bandwidth to do stuff like download a massive patch, (or entire movies, etc..) you might see more demands for these kinds of restrictions, not less.

I'm not saying I agree with any forced cut-offs at all, being that I love love LOVE to use the internet, but let's be honest in this discussion: gaming is an easy and likely target, and I can totally understand why a company might want to do this.

Beau

Posted: Mar 27th 2011 9:54AM Apakal said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
@Beau Hindman

That's kind of backwards of how advancing technology is supposed to work though. As technology improves, which I think we can all agree it has, its supposed to be more available, more affordable, and generally better. Just look at computers themselves. Look at what $1000 got you ten years ago and what it gets you now. Its a world of difference.

Why the internet business doesn't respond this way, offering better, cheaper service, I don't really understand. I don't know enough about how service providers work, but I have an inkling that something not quite right is going on here.
Reply

Posted: Mar 27th 2011 10:00AM Beau Hindman said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
@Apakal I agree with you. And while I think there is some truth to what you are suggesting, I am saying that this is (at least in the US) a physical issue. They have to put that cable into the ground, take out the old stuff, make towers, run lines...it's a LOT of work, and there are still areas of the country that don't even have the service that many of us do. I would bet that they would like to get those people basic service before we get better service. I know it feels good for us to sort of blame this on greed or some kind of corporate evil, but seriously -- they just don't have the lines yet.

Also, this is the problem with having a passion based in luxury. Ours are the first to be taxed, penalized, etc...we have no choice but to comply.

Beau

Reply

Posted: Mar 27th 2011 10:46AM Dunraven said

  • 2.5 hearts
  • Report
@Beau Hindman You seem to lack a clue at how little bandwith MMO's take to begin with so no it isn't that amazing the bandwidth comes from updating, not playing.

And no all this is, is a money grab my internet company here i the UK (seriously Internet) pulled the exact same thing last year, they can out will all these valid reasons and those valid reasons were proven to be horse dung. This is about money and greed, and if the consumer doesn’t strike back in five years you will be paying for bandwidth by the minuet.
Reply

Posted: Mar 27th 2011 11:11AM (Unverified) said

  • 3 hearts
  • Report
@Beau Hindman

"they just don't have the lines yet."

I'm sorry, but this statement is false and reveals a naive ignorance. The infrastructure is there. There is no "bandwidth shortage" and for all intents and purposes it is "growing on trees." But these companies are not looking to satisfy their customers, they are looking to satisfy their shareholders. And so ISPs in North America continue to maximize their profit by implementing bandwidth caps and throttling policies. Meanwhile, customers in Europe and Asia have 50Mbps for the equivalent of $20USD/month.

We're being sold down the river and defending these corporations is not helping our situation.
Reply

Posted: Mar 27th 2011 12:39PM Mystal said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
@(Unverified)

People in Europe and Asia have extremely high population densities across their entire nation in many (most) cases. It's much easier to provide dense infrastructure in places where every one is clustered together than across large, empty spaces like the middle of the USA and Canada.
Reply

Posted: Mar 27th 2011 1:01PM Beau Hindman said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
@(Unverified) The infrastructure, at least in the United States (and I'm betting Canada as well, being that they have great open expanses as we do) is not there. Remember, there are people just miles from me that do have high-speed internet because they the companies haven't come out that far yet -- and I live in Dallas.

I am in no way defending the actions of anyone, I am simply stating the truth. If they had the ability to charge people 60 bucks a month for high-speed internet (and I mean all those millions of people in middle America and way out in the middle of nowhere Canada) then they would.

In the case of some of these people who are in a "normal" high-speed area, who are having these issues and these cutbacks, well, it reads to me like the company is telling them a simple thing: "You are using too much internet juice. Stop. Here's how." Compared to the people who are not downloading files, playing a game while watching a dungeon walk-through video, those people are using too much internet.

From the customer's eyes, of course. Imagine if your trash man was late every day because the guy up the street was leaving mountains of stuff on the sidewalk every day -- eventually they would have to tell that guy to stop. He, like the gamers, are not the bulk of their customers.

Beau
Reply

Posted: Mar 27th 2011 1:03PM Beau Hindman said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
@Tempes Magus You're talking about technologies that are not only uncommon, but some barely practical. Yes, there *are* ways of doing all sorts of stuff, but in this case they need ways that not only work practically, but that also use some of the old system.

Otherwise, they have to replace the old system, which takes time.

Beau
Reply

Posted: Mar 27th 2011 1:04PM Beau Hindman said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
@Beau Hindman do not* have high speed. hehe
Reply

Posted: Mar 27th 2011 7:56PM Laephis said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
@Mystal

The "Europe and Asia are packed close together" argument is invalid.

Population densities are ridiculously high in cities like NYC and Chicago...so where are the cheap, high speed Internet options? They don't exist because these companies are abusing their government-granted monopolies.

And Beau, you haven't the faintest idea what you are talking about when it comes to the core infrastructure of the North American Internet. Please, stick to things you are educated about (like MMOs).
Reply

Posted: Mar 27th 2011 9:41AM Daverator said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
@Tempes Magus

The reason usage increases costs for the company is that they are oversold on bandwidth, a particular center for the company might have a 10 GBps connection to the internet and they might sell 150GBps worth of subscriptions to customers in the serviced areas. With the assumption that they all aren't ever going to be using it at once.

ATT even said as such on their explanation of capping total downloads. If 2% of the users used 20% of the bandwidth (assuming they literally had capped connections the entire time) then they are selling 10x the amount of internet capacity than they actually have.

Posted: Mar 27th 2011 9:54AM DrewIW said

  • Half a heart
  • Report
Just a friendly reminder that the regressive government that allows and encourages these practices will handily win the next election, because Canadians are literally retarded.

Posted: Mar 27th 2011 9:59AM RogersChris said

  • 1 heart
  • Report
Hi, this is Rogers_Chris, and I work for Rogers.

Our network management policy makes clear that we only manage upstream P2P traffic on our network:

"High-volume, low time-sensitive traffic (such as P2P file sharing) is limited to ensure all customers have a high level of service for time-sensitive tasks like sending email, requesting web pages, video and voice applications."

You can find the policy here: http://www.rogers.com/web/content/network_management

There is a problem with our traffic management equipment that is inadvertently slowing the game for some customers. While we have fixed some issues with a software modification, new problems have emerged that we expect will be addressed with a second software update in June.

We believe the problem occurs when P2P is running while simultaneously playing the game. If you are experiencing problems we suggest you turn off the peer to peer setting within the WoW game and ensure no other P2P file sharing applications are running while playing WoW. WoW does use P2P for software updates, but with this setting changed you should continue to automatically receive software updates through other methods.

This is only a temporary solution. We continue to work closely with the game manufacturer and our equipment supplier to help resolve this issue as soon as possible.

@Rogers_Chris

Posted: Mar 27th 2011 10:12AM myr said

  • 3 hearts
  • Report
@RogersChris

That's great, but you shouldn't be throttling upstream p2p traffic in the first place. What about games like Vindictus that depend on p2p for the actual gameplay?
Reply

Posted: Mar 27th 2011 10:58AM Loopy said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
@RogersChris "We believe the problem occurs when P2P is running while simultaneously playing the game."

I was wondering about this. I keep getting disconnected from WoW if i have a P2P program running. Good to hear that the problem is being worked on.
Reply

Posted: Mar 27th 2011 11:46AM Dumac said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
@RogersChris Oh wow, looks like you geniuses were the worlds first to find a cure for the plight of ISPs and their bandwidth. It was so easy, it was staring in your face all the time, wonder why no one else thought of it. Oh wait, its bullshit and you nor any other ISP in the world has an excuse for it.
Reply

Posted: Mar 27th 2011 1:28PM Utakata said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
@RogersChris

Thanks for keeping us posted. Though it must be an unsusal step to have Ragers official to post on 3rd party MMO journal blog, so I am presuming that you guys are taking this seriously.

However, it should be pointed out that there are many player functions in World of Warcraft such as raiding and player vs player that require bandwidth to be at it's best performance. Because poor or subpar bandwidth does seriously effect the out come of those activities. So I'll add my protest as a Roger's customer and a WoW player to the chorus to emphasize this is throttling for whatever resaon is simply not cool. Please correct this issue ASAP! And Thanks!
Reply

Posted: Mar 27th 2011 1:29PM Utakata said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
@Utakata

*Roger's...my apologies.
Reply

Featured Stories

WRUP: Expanshapaign is too a word

Posted on Dec 20th 2014 10:00AM

Engadget

Engadget

Joystiq

Joystiq

WoW Insider

WoW

TUAW

TUAW