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Reader Comments (58)

Posted: Mar 23rd 2011 12:03PM Niieh said

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What a great blog post, Beau!

Whatever your play-style is, dedicated or transient, the most important thing is that you enjoy yourself, and have fun while playing. MMOs are NOT about reaching max. level or about "pwning" other players, they are about immersion and enjoyment.

Thx for pointing out that f2p games deserve your money, if you enjoyed the game. I'm getting a bit sick of f2p players that expect a great game with lots of content updates and excellent customer service, while they refuse to spend any money on the game.

I'm a dedicated player myself, if I find a game I like, I spend thousands of hours in it. At the same time, I keep trying out new games, usually for short periods, like I am on a never ending quest to find the perfect virtual world. And sometimes (very rarely), I find a game that I like even better than my home-game of that time, and then I switch.

Posted: Mar 23rd 2011 12:17PM Rayko said

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@Beau Hindman

I understand this is not the main topic but you brought it up and maybe it's just me but complaining you can't tax homeless people is incredibly insensitive. Way to make a persons tragedy all about you.

Posted: Mar 23rd 2011 12:24PM Beau Hindman said

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@Rayko Actually, my comment "You can't tax them" was meant to show how a city like Dallas is frustrated simply because they cannot make money off of the homeless, not that I wanted to tax the homeless.

I was trying to point to the heartless nature of the city, actually siding with the homeless.

Beau
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Posted: Mar 23rd 2011 2:30PM Allegos said

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@Beau Hindman

I read this the same way Rayko did. Maybe the article should have just gone through another draft or two, but it reads like you're using an article about what could be better described as tourism in MMOs to get a complaint against homeless people off your chest.

I appreciate the clarification, but when I wrote my first comment to this article, I was kind of appalled.
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Posted: Mar 23rd 2011 1:20PM Titan1 said

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If anything, the dedicated, single subscription, hard core, 12 hour a day raider is what f**ks up MMO development.

Posted: Mar 23rd 2011 1:41PM StClair said

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Very interesting post.

I tend to have "hot and cold" periods with the games I play. I'll be really into one (sometimes coinciding with the release of a new expansion) for a while, then I'll drift away or have a mood to play something else. At least one game is for when I *don't* feel like being social with my online friends - there are times I just want to solo for a while, run some quests and maybe work out some frustrations by beating up monsters or distract myself from unhappy thoughts by mindless farming, crafting, etc.

Posted: Mar 23rd 2011 1:44PM Kaoy said

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I am something of a semi-transient. I think it's a symptom of me being a severe alt-junkie; it is rare that one game gives me enough options that I can stay with it for ever and ever and not get bored. So far, the only two games I have found that offered me the variety I desired have been more or less polar opposites of each other: Ragnarok and DDO. Heck, with DDO, they even reward you for playing different characters by giving you free points to spend in the cash shop.

I am also a bit of a casual gamer, so I rarely am playing more than one game at a time, and tend to go weeks or months between games. Heck, I only recently got back in to DDO after about a 6 month break, in which 4 of the months, I played nothing.

Also, Beau, I actually did try to meet up with you in games a number of times, in the early days of R&S. The real issue for me is that you often forgot to mention things like the server and faction you were in as well as the times you played. Perhaps if you kept a companion Twitter account to go along with the article, you might see improved turn outs, since it would give people a better idea of when to log in and where to go to hang out and play with you. Just say something like 'Planning to hop on for a couple hours around 5-ish. See you there!' or something, and you might inspire more people to actually try the game since they would have a better chance of actually getting to meet with you.

Posted: Mar 23rd 2011 1:52PM Beau Hindman said

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@Kaoy If you look at my signature in my Rise and Shiny column, you will see my Twitter and my Raptr, as well as my Facebook.

The main issue is that some of the odd games I play are a little confusing about faction/location/servers, so I am not always 100% sure. Also, Raptr does not pick up on most of the games I play unless I ask them to. By the time I get the games approved, I have moved on.

Follow me on Twitter, though, and you'll find I talk too much about the games I play! lol

Beau
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Posted: Mar 23rd 2011 1:46PM Itoao said

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Posted: Mar 23rd 2011 9:36AM
Ocho said

"I definitely consider myself a transient, so this article explains me to a T. I've never been into raiding and the meta-game after max level has never really interested me. I find I like to explore in MMOs, and I seem to be of a rare variety. In a new mission or quest, or dungeon, I'll stop to read all the text, explore every crevice, and see all there is to see. So, I've been termed slow, with the MMO populace I encounter most often more interested in just getting through content as fast as possible and not stopping to read or think about anything... slow = bad. So I'm a transient. I'll go from game to game and explore at my own pace. As I said, no strict raiding night, but gaming to me is a something you do when you're done everything else, not something that takes a priority over reality. You need those overly dedicated gamers, though, in order to maintain and keep the big games going. I am just not one of them."

I have to agree with you on this one. It really describes me. I guess I am an explorer at heart. I rarely reach max level. I also find it very hard to find groups of people who just want to hang. I mean you finish a quest with a group of people and they only grouped because they had to.
Even though they are going to do the exact quest you have next and are going to be in the same area, will most likely get more xp in a group.
They still feel the need to leave immediately.

This is a great discussion btw

Posted: Mar 23rd 2011 2:01PM Allegos said

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The idea that customers browse a variety of games before they commit to one just sounds like a functioning marketplace. I sure am glad you shared your contempt for people who live on the streets with us, though. You stay classy, guy.

Posted: Mar 23rd 2011 2:33PM Fakeassname said

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lol, some of these replies are almost as long as the article it's self!
(oh, wait, I've done that on stuff too ...)

personally I'm kinda on pins and needles about future mmo developments like the Torchlight mmo and Richard Garrott's next projects, my biggest complaint with mmo's is how much they turn into chores.

not that I want a lack of depth, but spending 15 minutes walking from town, 5 minutes grinding to complete a quest/fill up my inventory, and another 15 minutes walking back to town is not what I call depth.

show me a stack of games that I can pop into and spend less than 10 minutes walking around, actually enjoy the games combat, and not have to beg for 45 minutes trying to round up a party and I'll show you that it is possible to have more than one home and not be transient.

Posted: Mar 23rd 2011 3:12PM Dblade said

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God, it's NOT good for the genre. The rise of the transient gamer coincided with the rise of a lot of crappy, shoe-string budget F2P MMOs that people could play for free long enough till they got bored and moved to the next. This is not just a matter of trying a game till you settle on one, but simply playing for free or little cost as long as possible, and is not good for developers trying to make money.

It just keeps spiralling downwards too. We've started to see the non-MMO MMOs covered here, the "net games." Something like everquest online adventures, released ages ago, or FFXI, is deeper than most of the modern MMOs on the market, because there's little point to making deep player experiences when most players are transient.

Heck, most modern "MMOs" are just a grind slapped on a FPS, city-building or fighting game.

Posted: Mar 23rd 2011 5:10PM Mystal said

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Filthy vagrants, quit interfering with my punk rock shows! Don't you homeless people know that there are people with REAL problems, like deciding which MMOs to play?

Sorry, I know that your commentary on the homeless wasn't the point of your piece, but next time you might choose a subject that is less revealing of your lack of empathy.

Posted: Mar 23rd 2011 7:45PM Lissibith said

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I guess I'm not clear... are you saying dedicated gamers should spend money on games they don't like because it's better for the nebulous "industry"? I understand encouraging them to browse more and try other games, but honestly, a lot of MMOers do - and then they come back to their main game because they don't like what they try. So it seems to me if the industry wants to be more healthy and spread the wealth, instead of blaming players who regularly support it, maybe we ought to demand the developers start making better and more long-term-engaging games.

Posted: Mar 25th 2011 8:27PM Space Cobra said

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@Tempes Magus

You still have a continual payment overhead if you buy a home with a 30 or 15 year loan (or even 10) unless you are rich enough to get a 5 year or insta-pay your home. And then, there are property taxes and maintenance fees, either on buying a "uesd" home with problems or over time. I also think the tax write-offs start to go away if you have your house fully paid off.

Then, as you say, it is choosing the right neighborhood. This may differ among people, but I'd think most want very low crime rates and a safe/clean neighborhood. Location is problematic, because if you get a great location, you tend to pay more for a home (and more in property taxes). Plenty of people move FAR AWAY to suburbs that are very far from a major city. This may work for them, but I know many that commute and I know they don't like waking up extra early just to make it to work on time.

Althoug my opinion, many people who dabbled in real estate to flip homes, have raised prices in many parts of the country. In some instances, unnaturally raising prices in areas where costs-of-living are lower than other areas (comparing LA to Phoenix or New York to Houston).

Granted, there are some nice things in owning your own home. You can play loud music. You may have your own yard. More space, etc. But it is all trade-offs, much like life. I have studied home ownership a long time and many people glamorize it. Homes only appreciate in value at the same rate inflation goes up (at least, they keep their value, comparing something like the price of a home from 1970 and all other things to the price of homes now, counting inflation, it really stays the same: our money looses value). And really, while it gives you a plus on a bank statement (equity) IMO, homes you want to live in should not be used that way: to finance other ventures. Sure, you can put up your home if a business venture makes you wealthy, but if it doesn't, you are out of a home and you now owe your bank more money. If you use a home purely for renting to others or investment, sure. But if you want roots, you shouldn't rely on equity. You should rely on money in your bank account.

Yes, very off topic, but Tempes Magus does tend to make lots of posts and this pulled me out to explain it. Many of you may dismiss my arguments and really, I will say I am slowly shopping for a home in this low market to live in (I have too much stuff and have mucho money saved, even with renting) but I am aware obligations and some freedoms are going to change when I eventually (?) move into a home.

Posted: Mar 25th 2011 8:27PM Space Cobra said

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@Space Cobra

And yes, 2 days late reply! :P

Posted: Mar 28th 2011 12:04PM Barri said

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The thing is why so many games only focus on end game and leave the rest of the game boring and dull. Why bother add levels, I move from game to game cause they are so badly made. Like a lot of games should have used a skill based character development instead of levels.

Then the next thing is when they do use skill leveling they let you master every skill... all developers are like zombies now no new ideas. So I leave cause they are all the same boring crap.

Posted: Mar 30th 2011 10:06PM Degu said

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Games that make people want to leave after one month are bad for the industry.

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