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Reader Comments (17)

Posted: Mar 22nd 2011 2:03PM shillagan said

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I play this game all the time, It is a blast. Can suck if you get in a bad town. But I've been doing pretty good so far. I am about to go onto day 10 tonight.

Posted: Mar 22nd 2011 2:14PM Interitus said

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I just finished playing. Telling them not to waste our precious nuts and bolts.

Posted: Mar 22nd 2011 2:59PM Averice said

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So you only get 6 AP per 24 hours? That sounds kind of slow to me, maybe I'll check it out though.

Also, IDK, I fell asleep during Blair Witch Project. The theater was pitch black 50% of the time, what else was there to do? Now the feeling you're talking about, definitely got that from The Ring.

Posted: Mar 22nd 2011 3:49PM Beau Hindman said

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@Averice Yep there's a lot I didn't cover, but normally I try to avoid covering too much anyway. I just wanna' hook ya into trying it and discovering it for yourself.

There are also a lot of social tools, so you'll be checking in on the drama a lot of the time. That's half the fun.

Beau

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Posted: Mar 22nd 2011 3:58PM Interitus said

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@Averice

Water gives you another 6. Eating gives you another 6 (7 if you can get a kitchen going). Alcohol, drugs, lots of things can give you AP. But have consiquences.

The trick is to balance the communities AP. Do you gather materials? Do you build? If you build, what do you build? Do you use your AP's to simply upgrade your own home to protect just yourself?

The AP limit causes people to work together.
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Posted: Mar 23rd 2011 2:50AM Averice said

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@Interitus Oh okay, thanks for the info ya'll.
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Posted: Mar 22nd 2011 3:29PM shillagan said

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you refresh 6 ap for free once a day. But you can get more by eating, drinking water, alcohol, drugs and a couple other things. But if you take 2 drugs in the same day you can get hooked and die if you don't take one drug a day and they are somewhat rare.

Posted: Mar 22nd 2011 3:54PM OmegaDestroyer said

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Just tried it. Didn't know it was frowned upon to build a hovel. I did put AP towards finishing up the town portal, so I'd like to think that will balance out somewhat.

Posted: Mar 22nd 2011 3:59PM Interitus said

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Actually people don't like town portals either. I would suggest starting a workshop first. If everyone builds a tent on day 1 you should have enough defense to survive the first attack.

Posted: Mar 22nd 2011 4:14PM Kalex716 said

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I played it, and i do agree their are some interesting and brilliant design mechanisms that the game community at large can adopt here (you really do have to rely on others, theirs no "soloing" at this game)...

However, calling it an MMO is a stretch. I quickly got bored after monkeying around with it over a week as even the worst and best games play out all the same.

It's more like playing a board game with a bunch of people you don't know in a browser for a few days than it is an MMO.

Posted: Mar 22nd 2011 5:18PM Beau Hindman said

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@Kalex716 If we look at what is happening in the game, it is definitely an MMO. In a "normal" MMO like WoW you have a character that you can interact with, and places to go with that character.

There are no rules stating that the land you travel through is open world and massive. By that definition, we would rule out many, many MMOs. So, as you travel through the town and the land beyond (the desert) you re doing the same thing as if you travel through a larger world. Again, there are definitions based on size. As there should not be.

You interact with other players. You can trade, vote on, communicate with, and even force them into the gallows or banish them. Just because we are reading about these actions does not mean we are not doing them.

Remember, if we start to say that, because of the text design and containment of the game within a browser, the game is no longer an MMO, then we rule out the PRE-MMO MMOs -- the MUDs. That would not only be wrong, but cruel to those players like myself who enjoy MUDs and other "basic" MMOs as much, if not more, than the 3-D ones.

Beau
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Posted: Mar 22nd 2011 5:19PM Beau Hindman said

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@Beau Hindman not* definitions based on size. lol
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Posted: Mar 22nd 2011 5:39PM Kalex716 said

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@Beau Hindman

Thanks for your response Beau,

I suppose I should have expressed why it doesn't fit my personal archetype for MMO specifically, cause I do agree with the majority of your points.

However, I feel like it doesn't fall into the realm of MMO's due to the simplified conditions that each round aims towards. Sooner or later, no matter what, the zombies will over run your camp, and then you start over with the same rules in another round, with new participants. Its like a game of monopoly played online. Yes, I can communicate, and work with some players while working against others, or maybe even hold a get out of jail free card to sell to someone etc but its a contrived experience. The ruleset, and how you define yourself inside the world isn't emergent or expansive enough to fit my definition of MMO, and its certainly not persistent enough (you die every time).

Anyhow, theirs much better things to talk about regarding die2nite than whether it fits into our stupid definitions or not... I personally loved the limitations of communication, like you mentioned, its all via posts and that somehow adds to the "isolated" feeling the game perpetuates. Limitations by design are often a good thing, specially for "world building" games and MMO's. I also really like the psychology at play regarding how you either work to help your camp, or work to help yourself. I recollect a round where someone who really did have intentions, got caught doing something everyone thought was selfish... He got banned, but the guy kept surviving on his own and still continued to help the camp selflessly, we all felt really bad about that. This was a really interesting dynamic to explore and I'd love more MMO's to create player-centric accountability like this in some capacity where it becomes part of the experience.

Anyway, good article... I did get bored after a while, but I can certainly agree die2nite has some real "gems" for features.

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Posted: Mar 22nd 2011 5:50PM Beau Hindman said

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@Kalex716 Good points. I see what you mean. I guess then that I am glad that I called it "MMO-lite!" :)

Beau
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Posted: Mar 22nd 2011 5:10PM (Unverified) said

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BUILD A HOVEL IMMEDIATELY!!!

Posted: Mar 22nd 2011 11:00PM oxlar said

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I took a look at the game info. I was put off by how much of an advantage there is to 'buying' hero status. Definitely seperates the playing field by a lot from the general populace. So instead of trying the game I left. Not worth the time because I'm not going to pay 12 euros (no idea what that is in dollars) each month for hero status. Not for a browser game with very limited play time. Seems stupid to do that.

Posted: Mar 22nd 2011 11:12PM Beau Hindman said

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@oxlar The hero status is pricey, especially for an indie browser game. Still, the abilities or "advantages" that the hero has is not over your character, but over himself if he didn't have them.

As a "normal" player, you can still perform, survive and do fine. Hero status does make it easier, though. If someone else having it easier than you turns you off, I can see why you'd leave. For me, (I played with an without it) I see no difference.

If anything, I would have more pride when I survived without it, but who knows?

Beau
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