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Reader Comments (13)

Posted: Dec 28th 2010 1:02PM Petter M said

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Unless, you know, you don't like the business model. Then it wasn't a very good year for MMO gaming...

Anyway - I think you have totally misunderstood the problem that a lot of players (including yours truly) had with the Allod Item Store. It wasn't just that stuff was stupidly over-priced, which they were, but also because Gpotato/AN use their cash shop as punishment. While most other F2P-titles entice players by offering up fun gameplay and selling inconvience-lessening items, Allods Online punishes its players when they die - be it through the old perfume/fear of death-mechanic or the new cursed items.

I know, the curse removing items are sellable on the auction house, which is good and nice. But someone, somewhere, has to buy them in the first place. Since the only thing you can't get away from in a MMO, especially one with such a focus on PvP, is the death of your character, the developer has secured that there will always be people buying these items from the store. It's a brilliant move from an economic standpoint. From a player standpoint, it's pretty low.

In short, it was about so much more than simply overpriced bags. I haven't logged into Allods for ages, and I don't ever plan to do so again before they rethink their approach to their player base, so I can't tell you if the game is as empty as some people say or as successful as you say it is.

Posted: Dec 28th 2010 1:59PM Pingles said

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@Petter M

While I mostly agree, the Allods situation bugs me in a different way.

Allods is attempting to change free-to-play to "everyone pays" model.

It may not be a lot, but everyone is required to chip in. Between incense, death penalties you are requiredto use cash shop items to play. Some are meted out in quests (in other words EVERY day you play you have to go to a capital city and run several quests) and are available in cash shops.

However, WHAT OTHER GAME requires ANY item be used every day to play?

The most disturbing thing, to me, is that it seems to be working. Folks don't seem to mind. The game is thriving. *sigh* Maybe I'm out of touch.
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Posted: Dec 28th 2010 2:09PM Beau Hindman said

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@Pingles Actually, once again you leave out the fact that players can either

1) ignore the curses

2) buy the items from other players using in-game gold

3) not worry about it, because the chance of curse is rare.

That is far, far from being "required."

Beau
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Posted: Dec 28th 2010 2:25PM Pingles said

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@Beau Hindman

I was unclear. The Cursing does not bother me near as much as the damage reduction. A few patches ago they reduced everyone's damage substantially (50%?). You can get your damage back by using a cash shop item. It lasts 24 hours so you require one every day (also availabel between players).

Or, you're right, you can just do 50% damage.

Sorry, it irks me. Game-killing? I guess not. Not for a lot of people. I was such a big fan of this game (even contacted by a developer through Sera) that it just breaks my heart that they have settled on this method for bringing in cash.

But I am starting to feel a bit silly cluttering up every Allods thread with my nonsense so I'll go ahead and stick to talking up the other games I like.
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Posted: Dec 28th 2010 2:34PM Petter M said

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@Pingles Yeah, I completely forgot the 50% damage reduction. Again, punishing players. That's what they do in general, which is a huge problem with the Allods store. It doesn't matter if it is available to trade at the AH or not, it's punishing the player base into paying. As I said, a brilliant economic move.
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Posted: Dec 28th 2010 1:11PM Ozmodan said

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While I enjoy many of the many good f2p games out there, badmouthing subscription games is just silly. Beyond the Turbine offerings the f2p market is flooded with lots of fun games, yet none have any content to speak of, hence the playability of these games last, at best, for a month or two for most of us.

Stick to lauding all the good f2p games out there.

Posted: Dec 28th 2010 2:07PM Beau Hindman said

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@Ozmodan I am very specifically "badmouthing" "AAA" subscription based games that were released, or added significant content, over the last year. I would offer you the chance to name me the "AAA" games that you are impressed with.

Also, you are literally saying that not a single FTP game has "any content to speak of." I don't think I need to address this to show exactly how wrong a view like that can be. There are literally hundreds of titles, with probably a few dozen significant ones that were released in 2010 -- are you meaning to say that you tried them all? After all, I tried all of the "AAA" subscription releases/significant content games...even then I am not making such a sweeping statement.

Beau
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Posted: Dec 28th 2010 3:43PM Dblade said

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I'd add Vindictus launching to this. Also the trend of F2P games released based on a license, like Dynasty Warriors. Earth Eternal closing too.

Posted: Dec 28th 2010 5:39PM Bladerunner83 said

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Trends may have changed but the Free to Pay model still feels like second choice in my book. Really, should we actually call these broken games, "games"? Ten years ago the game world was hardcore, DAoC, Anarchy Online, Ultima Online; Now it's filled with care-bear copies and jerky animation, with enough bugs to scare an exterminator. Not to mention quality, perfect example is Perfect World Ent., it's amazing the amount of time at which one can produce games, but does it compare to the time it took to make Cataclysm? Better yet do any of the games compare in quality to an expansion for a game that is a little over 6 years old. In the history of F2P it would seem that the games start out as a copy from another country, converted so the US can understand them or they are a dying game; A dying game that needs a good 'o' fashion Michael Jackson face lift. Hey some people like buying fake diamonds, while others like to get 100% access for a monthly sub. I'm a sub.-guy if you haven't caught on yet and these games will never equally compare to the king of all MMOs, (fill in the blank). Long Live the King Baby!

Posted: Dec 28th 2010 6:31PM Pingles said

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@Bladerunner83

I suggest that you try some F2Ps. Especially some of the newer ones. There are quite a few good ones out there. "Good" being a very subjective term so it's hard to name what YOU would like. I've been impressed by Iris Online and Zentia recently. Both have very deceptively cutesy graphics with great games beneath them.

Honestly, there are SO many out there that it is likely that one is PERFECT for you. Only cost to try is your time.
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Posted: Dec 28th 2010 7:56PM Reefpirate said

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Perpetuum Online? Smoothest MMO launch of 2010, and possibly of the last 5 years...

Hey! MMOs don't have to be crap on launch day/launch month!

Posted: Dec 28th 2010 8:08PM GreenArmadillo said

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"Lord of the Rings Online, EverQuest II, Global Agenda, Champions Online and Pirates of the Burning Sea all go free-to-play"

CO has not yet shifted over to their new model, Pirates switched over about a month ago, GA swapped immediately after launch because no one was paying their monthly fee, and LOTRO and EQ2 both switched over to their new models about three months ago. I'd say that the jury is still out on whether any or all of the above will end up better (i.e. studio brings in more revenue and demonstrably reinvests some of it into the game) in the long run.

Posted: Jan 2nd 2011 10:42PM (Unverified) said

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@GreenArmadillo

The title of the post: "The top indie and free-to-play stories of 2010"

The title of the post you were apparently trying to comment on: "The top indie and free-to-play stories of 2010 that were beneficial to the playerbase at large, and have already proven to be successful."

Four of the five mentioned have already switched to this model (as you yourself said), and the other has announced the switch for "early 2011".

You're exactly right...the jury is still out. I'm just not sure what that has to do with five fairly major subscription MMO's switching to a F2P or freemium model, which I would think definitely was one of the top ten F2P stories of the year.
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