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Reader Comments (14)

Posted: Nov 30th 2010 3:29PM Doba said

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Sadly when I was 9 I started playing this and well it was a lol moment, now when I look back and say wow did I really make a gnome priest and play for 5 months and only get to lvl 25? Sigh.....

Posted: Nov 30th 2010 3:37PM Unshra said

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@Doba Part of your problem might have been that you couldn't make a gnome priest back then. They were introduced in 4.0.3a which has not been out for a month yet.
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Posted: Nov 30th 2010 3:46PM CCon99 said

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So you know, from your forced cut & paste of the Joystiq website, you still have a link to your own site, instead of a link to Joystiq's site at the top of the page.

Posted: Nov 30th 2010 5:03PM claytondora said

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Who's the target audience?
How much does it cost?
What's the game all about?

To whom exactly are these questions addressed? WoW has been out for more than four years now. Who, exactly, is coming to massively.com, and doesn't know the first thing about world of warcraft?

Posted: Nov 30th 2010 5:22PM saintstryfe said

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@claytondora there are these lovely inventions called search engines. people type in queries, say "is wow right for my child?" and it can find articles. You may not know to come to Massively normally, but these magical devices tend to help us find information in places we might not normally look. dolt.
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Posted: Nov 30th 2010 7:59PM claytondora said

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@saintstryfe
Dolt is a good word, feckless is better. I don't come to this website so I can read articles written for the google-inspired coddling mother.
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Posted: Dec 3rd 2010 4:28PM Brianna Royce said

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@claytondora The MMO Family articles ask and answer these questions for every game covered in order to create a point of comparison. The intended audience consists of adults with children, and more specifically, parents who may be into MMOs in a vague sense but who might not really see much difference between WoW and some of the others.

Massively has hardcore and casual readers and every type in between. If you're not interested in a WoW overview for parents (it says so in the title!), MMO Family is probably not the column for you. Fortunately, we have lots of other recurring features that will probably be more aligned to your interests, and a sister site, WoW Insider, that goes into far greater detail on the game.
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Posted: Nov 30th 2010 5:19PM Drunken Irish Sniper said

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It's not for kids anymore.
Just today I was doing a quest where I could either bash some buried humans heads open with a shovel and get blood to gush out and cover me or dig them out, I'm Forsaken so of course I killed all but two (The two that survived will have nightmares of me bashing their friends heads in while zombies eat their other friends heads for the rest of their short disturbed lives).

Kids shouldn't be playing games anyways, they should be outside playing sports and getting real life experience.
Parents should learn how to raise their kids.

Posted: Nov 30th 2010 5:48PM Solp said

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@Drunken Irish Sniper

While I don't agree that kids should HAVE to be out getting life experience or playing sports, or any other of the things kids "should" be doing; it's important for parents to realise that the internet doesn't promote healthy habits or traits. Particularly in a game as addicting as WoW can be.

I don't feel that online games are a place for kids, there's all the jerkiness of real life, with none of the repremanding consequences for being horrible to someone else.

On the subject of WoW as a topic for parents who frequent Massively... seems a moot point, since any parent who visits Massively would surely know, or easily be able to find out info about WoW should their kid wish to play it.

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Posted: Nov 30th 2010 11:43PM SgtBaker1234556 said

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2004 called and wanted its WoW review back

Posted: Dec 1st 2010 1:49AM Joystiq Login Bugs SUCK said

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For any parents that may be reading this and considering if they should let their kids play I have only one thing to say.

[2: Trade] AvgPlayer: [Ferocious Butt][Pounding][For the Children]

Posted: Dec 1st 2010 1:28PM Waxil said

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The game may be rated T for teen but it's an online community which can be (and often is) far closer to (and even beyond) a solid M. This is why the ratings box says "online experience may vary", aka people suck.

As an adult who spent an awful lot of his youth on games I would also like to remind parents to be firm about it, set limits and enforce them, and don't be afraid to take gaming completely off the table if appropriate. Will they hate you for doing so? Yes, but it's not your job to be their friend.

Posted: Dec 1st 2010 2:00PM Tom in VA said

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My advice -- and what I require of my (younger) kids, if they want to play WoW -- is to turn off all chat channels, all of them, and not to group for instances or group quests. Period. There's plenty else to do in WoW that's quite fun.

I only have 1 pre-teen (left), the rest of my kids are teenagers. They all play WoW. We have gone over how to deal with creeps, etc., and the youngest of my kids, as I said, is not allowed to use chat at all in any form until he's older.

Frankly, the game is a whole lot "quieter" (and, in my opinion, less obnoxious) with the Say, Trade, Whisper, Yell, General, Trade, etc., channels all turned off. :-)

Posted: Dec 3rd 2010 9:54PM Jack Pipsam said

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well, WoW is a kids game

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