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Reader Comments (10)

Posted: Nov 11th 2010 1:02PM Carolina said

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And don't forget to have fun! Some enjoy the "work" of being a guild leader, figure out if you do, and if you don't, don't push it and end up ruining your leisure time, and probably other's too.

Posted: Nov 11th 2010 1:30PM Seffrid said

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The best guild I was ever in was early EQ, to join you had to pass an adventuring test and there was a real sense of camaraderie. I suspect things have got a lot more involved since those early days with guildhalls, bank accounts, crafting and not least voicechat among other things.

I had my fill of guild politics and RL clique leaderships some years ago, however, and haven't touched a guild since other than to create my own in one game so as to stop the constant random invites.

For those who are interested in either joining or running a guild and don't know much about it I would have thought the article would be pretty useful.

Posted: Nov 11th 2010 2:56PM Dblade said

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A lot of these recommendations are why guild joining has become unappealing to me. It's like considering someone from a job: interview process, availability, qualifications, etc.

Since games have become more solo friendly, guilds just don't offer much anymore to be worth the hassle. Except for endgame raiding, which also happens to be the most drama-filled portion of MMO gaming.

Posted: Nov 11th 2010 3:34PM JeekFreak said

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Dblade, while I respect your viewpoint, the guidelines presented here moreover help to insure that both people running guilds and those looking to join find a mutually inclusive appeal to their needs, play styles, expectations, availability, etc.

Guidelines can be as hard, or soft, as you need them to help your guild run more smoothly and efficiently. It will help attract like-minded playing members, which is what will keep the guild healthy and active.

Great start here Karen, looking forward to the follow up articles.

Oh, and the View from the Top is very well done. Good topics, fun guests, a really well done Podcast.

Posted: Nov 11th 2010 3:50PM Araxes said

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I remember reading something a long time ago, when I first began playing EQ2. It was a snippet of wisdom I've never forgotten:

QUOTE:

When to *avoid* a guild:
1. You are blindly recruited.
2. You are "required" to register at a website.

ENDQUOTE


It was sound advice.

Keep it informal, keep it light, and keep it clean.

The most important part of running a guild is to take an active interest in it, and in your members. It *is* a job, and just like anything else, if you want it to be successful (however you measure success, whether it be raiding, grouping, questing, crafting, socializing, roleplaying, or any combination thereof) you need to invest the TIME to make it successful. I think that's the number one point that many guild officers overlook or don't consider when they set out. Even if you anticipate only a small, social guild, you still need to be active and take an interest in those people.

Posted: Nov 11th 2010 7:28PM (Unverified) said

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I'm curious why you feel any guild which would require you to sign up for a website (such as a guild's forums) would be a guild to avoid joining.

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Posted: Nov 12th 2010 8:50AM Araxes said

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@ kendricke

Are you inviting, or are you policing? It says a lot about the overall mentality of a guild. It's rather elitist. The website is a roped-off entrance, essentially. It doesn't matter if you might be a friendly, helpful, active player, or a knowledgable one; 'Oh, you didn't sign up, yet, sorry. Go do that.'

Let me clarify, I'm not referring to someone who says: "Hey, go sign up at our website when you get the chance, it's got a lot of good information." That is completely different. But ...

... making a strict requirement to actually sign up at a website before consideration for an invite, or before consideration for a promotion, is a red-tape rule that means absolutely nothing to the average player, and in some cases may even put them off.

I would question the need for any non-high-end raiding guild to actually have such a requirement. Certainly members should be *encouraged* to visit the website for a number of reasons: announcements, raid coordination, tracking of raid participation, and so forth. Those are practical concerns and if there is a real and practical concern, then there is a need.

However, for a guild simply to say, "Before we invite you, you must sign up at our website" or "Before we promote you, you must sign up at our website" - that's just a strange requirement.

I just flatly don't see the need for that requirement to be in place without value placed behind it.

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Posted: Nov 11th 2010 10:37PM Valdamar said

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In EverQuest I was an officer and later leader of a big raiding guild, and before that a casual guild. In the big guild I often led raids, ran DKP, and played principle roles on the raid (main tank, main assist, puller, etc.) - sometimes all at the same time.

The problem I had is that it became more like a job than a game - people always needed me for something so I never had much time to just play the game when we weren't raiding - and due to our packed raid calendar and my central role there really wasn't the option to drop out if you just didn't feel like raiding, or were ill, or even if RL issues came up sometimes (the more seriously we raided, the more serious your excuse had to be if you couldn't turn up). In the end our guild was more like a small army than a group of friends - we became too disciplined - and then as we were forced by progression into raiding the same place for months on end (Temple of Veeshan) I burned out on both the game and my guild role, then someone who wanted my leader role started a smear campaign against me behind my back, so I took that as a good excuse to just quit.

I've never looked for that kind of responsibility, or membership of a raiding guild, ever since. It's not what I want from a game any more. Sure it was very often fulfilling, but not all the time, and it was a big drain on my time.

So all of my guilds since then have been casual ones, mostly built around a core of real life friends and also online-only friends that I've been guilded with in past MMOs. Sure, they still all usually expect me to lead (and I have much more fun leading raids/groups than leading the guild itself), but I don't mind that so much as long as running the guild doesn't turn into a nightmare of calendars, spreadsheets and having to mediate every single minor dispute that occurs between guildmates.

Although I think nostalgically of my EQ guild more than any other, I think my favourite guild was probably my Planetside clan - in that game it didn't matter how many people you had because you could accommodate up to 30 clanmates in the same platoon (3 squads of 10) and there was no pressure to log-in at certain times or to put in so many hours. There was actually an option to auto-join the clan's platoon, so usually I'd log-in and bam I was in the clan's platoon already and just had to catch the dropship to pod down to wherever they were, or grab a vehicle and drive/fly out there.

Planetside just made it so easy to be guilded whereas EQ didn't always. EQ2 made some good strides with their in-game guild tools (certainly the best I've ever seen in any game), but my guilds nowadays are usually so casual that such tools are not much use to us besides being interesting for keeping track of what people are doing.

My current supergroup+villaingroup in City of Heroes has just 2 members now (we started with 7, but people have quit the game and not returned) - me and a friend - and that works fine for me at the moment - just no hassles at all, exactly like a game should be. CoH just makes it so easy to chat to other people via in-game custom channels that I really don't need a guild for socialising there, and that game makes it so easy to group up and get things done with complete strangers that people team purely for the fun of teaming, not because the game forces it on them, or because their progress requires it - I wish all MMOs were like that.

Posted: Nov 12th 2010 11:19AM (Unverified) said

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/signed!

Posted: Nov 18th 2010 5:50PM boojiboy71 said

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With regard to signing up on the guild website, this worked very well for our Vanguard guild.

First, if someone was willing to sign-up and fill out an application for membership, it showed they were serious about joining our guild.

Secondly, the guild website was the hub of all of our communications from the weekly schedule, to ad hoc events, to the code of conduct, to raiding loot rules and on and on. It simply didn't work to have a guild member who wasn't willing to get involved with the mechanics of the guild.

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