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Reader Comments (42)

Posted: Nov 5th 2010 8:08AM The Minn said

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Age Of Conan. I got it at launch. Yes it is a lot better now but since release I have been playing other MMOs. I believe I only got to level 10 in Tortage and then quit. Since then I just have not played it.

Posted: Nov 5th 2010 8:09AM (Unverified) said

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Champions Online

Posted: Nov 5th 2010 11:46AM XOR said

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ditto , champions
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Posted: Nov 5th 2010 8:24AM The Minn said

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I would also like to add APB. I beta tested it for 30 minutes and then realize that I should stop playing it, and the rest is history...

Posted: Nov 5th 2010 8:40AM Damn Dirty Ape said

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I think you may have missed the idea behind the article. They aren't asking, 'what MMO did you play the least', but rather, 'what MMO did you spend the most time on just screwing around and not killing things'. At least.... I think....

It's a pretty vague question honestly, since the author says 'This doesn't mean that the time spent was a wash, naturally, but looking back you didn't really wind up playing the game so much as existing in the game space whilst doing other things.'. I would count using using the market, auction house, or crafting as playing the game the same way as killing monsters. The only difference is that instead of your xp going up, your money is advancing. Heck, anything that is a game mechanic of any kind I would call 'playing the game' (market, crafting, fishing, traveling, sorting inventories, guild management, etc).

To try and answer the topic, I would probably go with WoW or EQ (the games I spent the most time playing in the past). Due to the difficulty in traveling in EQ sometimes I would just log on and talk to people for a while then log out (though usually I was looking for a group the whole time, and eventually gave up). In WoW sometimes I would just BS with the guild, although honestly I would almost always still be doing some game 'playing' at the same time (fishing, etc).
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Posted: Nov 5th 2010 8:31AM Valdamar said

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In EverQuest, back in 1999-2002, I'd often log in on non-raid nights expecting to be crawling through a dungeon inside the hour (only because sometimes it took 30-60mins just to travel to a dungeon and get a group, even when playing a druid with teleports), then I'd say hello on guildchat and immediately get dragged into some guild drama that had recently erupted, and which as an officer (and later guild leader) I'd be expected to mediate and sort out.

It could be as "simple" as two guildmates arguing over something petty, and poisoning /guild chat with their argument - or as tricky as a feud that had dragged in some members of an allied guild as well - usually it was all very silly and unnecessary, but ruffled feathers needed to be smoothed back into place, and other officers needed to feel like they were kept "in the loop" when they came online later. So quite often it would turn into several hours of me doing not much more than sending /tells. Too many times it consumed my whole evening, so I never got as far as Sebilis, Velketors, or whatever dungeon I had planned to head to.

Not really surprising I've avoided large guilds - and especially leadership positions in large guilds - in every MMO I've played since EQ. Honestly I can do without all the guild drama/politics and other hassles when I log in after a long/tough day at work (in an office with lots of its own petty feuds and politicking going on) and just want to bash up some monsters to help me relax.

In CoH (the only MMO I've played for more years than I played EQ) I've frequently spent half an hour or more purely on marketeering, visiting the tailor, moving characters to different day job locations, and so on - but the only heinously large chunks of non-combat/non-questing time I can think of is when I've redesigned/rebuilt/modified our supergroup bases - I easily lose 3-4 hours at a time on that if I don't watch the clock. Housing in EQ2 was just as "bad" for eating up time, but usually only when I decorated my house initially - in CoH because you can change the entire structure/layout of your base it can be even more time consuming once you get started.

In most MMOs I try to minimise how much time I spend "in town" on crafting, marketeering/selling, or whatever - because exploring, questing and in combat are where I want to be, mostly.

Posted: Nov 5th 2010 8:42AM Ragemore said

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Eve Online has this one in spades.

If you consider, mission running, pvp, and mining game play, I still have logged into this game and spent hours doing non of those. It might have been moving cargo around from one station to another, or scouting, or wading through the markets in the region.

Eve absorbs alot of your time on tasks that are not shooting people in the face.

Even a patrol of 0.0 looking for a fight can suck up four hours, and you never even locked a guy.

No other game compares in the time sink area.

And yet I still like the game.

Posted: Nov 5th 2010 9:57AM Scott Ossington said

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I agree I think that the jumping in Guild Wars is a deal breaker, that and the lack of loot, ie armour.
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Posted: Nov 5th 2010 8:43AM gildhur said

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Guild Wars. It's the only other MMO I own (besides LotRO). Not sure why, but I just can't get far enough into it. I think it's the no jumping. >,

Posted: Nov 5th 2010 8:58AM (Unverified) said

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i have also bought guild wars but just cant seem to get into it, ive rolled a few alts on it but just cant get any further than when everything gets destroyed (like the very beginning)
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Posted: Nov 5th 2010 12:14PM The Other Chris said

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@godly967

Post-Searing Prophecies is, IMO, the hardest part of the game to get past, for me. No difficulty-wise, just that it goes on and takes a while to get past. All the while you are looking at desolation. Granted, there are some pretty areas, even in the desolation, but it is overall very dreary. Luckily, it's something that the A.net people realized quite some time ago, making the other games and expansion that much better. Keep at it though, its a great game. :)
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Posted: Nov 5th 2010 9:01AM Pewpdaddy said

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FFXI by far, it was either waiting for 2+ hours trying to find a party. Or actually while I was lvling up Smithing, I played for 4+ hours and earned a whopping 2.5 up ticks in smithing skill.

Posted: Nov 5th 2010 9:03AM Grendel said

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Seven years of Ultima Online.

Posted: Nov 5th 2010 9:18AM Grendel said

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What I wanted to say: seven years of UO and all I did was chatting, mining, building and decorating my house. Best social and crafting aspects in an mmo EVER.
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Posted: Nov 6th 2010 8:51PM Aardvarkk said

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Best part of UO I remember was standing in the main town (forgot the name now) and selling high level scrolls. Just a fun way to whittle away some time and get to meet some great people.
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Posted: Nov 5th 2010 9:07AM Birk said

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LOTRO: I've played my minstrel for at least 20 hours, and he's only level 14. Why? Because he spends all his time in the Prancing Pony playing the flute and chatting with folks.

Musical instruments in that game are amazing. I have spent a full two hours doing nothing but learning songs (I only play manually).

-Birk

Posted: Nov 5th 2010 9:12AM (Unverified) said

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I commonly find myself logging into an MMO and doing not much besides walking around a bit and engaging in conversations in Local, Guild/Corp and Alliance Chats. But even though I don't get to actually play the game, the time I spent doing such things never feels like a waste. It is true that digital friendships aren't the same as normal friendships, but it is also true that they are friendships nonetheless, and that you can have very interesting conversations with people who you meet online.

Posted: Nov 5th 2010 9:15AM Beau Hindman said

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I don't think I've yet met a game that forced a player to do a certain activity, or at least mostly. Even in the most linear, quest-driven MMOs there will always be the unscripted social element.

At the very least, I should say. There's the roleplay, the exploration, the crafting....so many things that even a simple box with a chat room can allow for. So, I like the original question, but it doesn't apply to someone unless they think there is a hidden rule that dictates what activity "counts" and what doesn't. In fact, one of the first thing I do (when I'm not reviewing a game) is look for things that are outside of the normal path of activity.

Anyway, who says that those activities aren't gameplay, or "proper" playing? :)

Beau

Posted: Nov 5th 2010 9:33AM aillas said

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Of the games I put decent time into, LoTRO, where I would sometimes log in and work on crafting.

For the last half of my sub to EVE, I would literally log on only to update my skill training queue. I eventually unsubbed as I couldn't get into the game.

As for who says those activities aren't gameplay - I believe the article is asking about anything that doesn't generate xp or contribute towards leveling. No hidden rules other than this one: does the game give xp for doing it?
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Posted: Nov 5th 2010 9:48AM Beau Hindman said

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"I believe the article is asking about anything that doesn't generate xp or contribute towards leveling." -- I know, that's why I noted social activities, like roleplay, or other activities like exploration. Of course, there are games that don't even use levels or XP! :)

My response was only saying that there are no "wrong" activities, or activities that do not count as activities. In fact, in his example, the guy checks his mail and auctions. While that does not generate XP, there is no rule that says you *have to* generate XP/level as a player. The questions would only apply to very specific circumstances, and very specific types of players -- which was not indicated.

I'm being picky, I know -- but that's what makes these so fun! :)

Beau
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