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Reader Comments (8)

Posted: Nov 2nd 2010 11:12AM Birk said

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Wow, what an absolutely haunting recount of company failure. My hearts go out to you guys, that is some seriously heavy stuff.

I really hope someone buys up APB and rehires those key folks that worked on it for so long. I know it's a fairytale dream; but the game looked extremely interesting, and with a little love could easily be a hit.

Here's hoping.

*raises glass*

-Birk

Posted: Nov 2nd 2010 11:27AM Askgar said

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Really great article, spoilt a bit by this at the end:

"APB is out now on PC."

Posted: Nov 2nd 2010 11:48AM (Unverified) said

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There are rumors coming from a very trusted sight on the un-official APB forums that lights are on at RTW. That a buyer has been found and will return before the holidays with a clean slate. http://www.apbforum.com/ . Also if the rumor is not true support http://actiondistrict.com/ they have been attempting night and day to create a server if APB doesn't return.

Posted: Nov 2nd 2010 2:53PM Space Cobra said

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I liked the article and the comments attached to it are interesting from a few "insiders" of the industry or company.

As words of wisdom that will go unheeded, mainly because I don't think the right people in the industry are reading comment replies to an article here, I will say this:

Passion is great. I love optimism. I love a sense of family in a corporate enviroment. But really, in retrospect they really needed a "grumpy Gus" over there. Someone who would question every little thing loudly and be listened to (even if he believed in every conspiracy theory out there). In short, you need a bit of pessimism to balance out the optimism. You need balance and you need to weigh both sides carefully. Granted, even that is problematic, but perhaps, Realtime Worlds would have been smarter initially with pursuing an MMO at the start by either deciding NOT to pursue it or take a different route and not be everything from publisher to customer service to server maintenance and more.

Posted: Nov 2nd 2010 6:59PM Crode said

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This still doesn't explain how 150+ people working 5 years with $XXX millions had so little progress, content, and design flaws.

Posted: Nov 2nd 2010 7:41PM Graill440 said

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This happens when people in charge wont listen. We had external investigation on companies interacting with our units, we had the displeasure of heading one such inquiry and the result are always the same, the headshed wouldnt listen to the input from the lower raking folks. In our case it was a PFC with a great idea interacting with a civilian PHD, and since the PHD was more important and supposedly smarter, the project failed and went over budget, people were fined and jailed, simply because they wouldnt listen or hedd "the little guy".

This article smacks of that, sad that over the years, decades even, developers still do not listen to what some of us call......common sense. And because of that lives are destroyed, jobs lost, and fingers pointed.

Companies in which honesty is key, morals take precedence, and company execs listen and heed base level employees regardless of how it makes them look, seldom if ever fail.

Back in the day, in my advice to new troopies i stated one thing above all, always do the hard, right thing, no matter how much it hurts.

The example in the civilian world would be an exec bringing a sublevel employee that they have been feeding off of idea wise into the radar of a VP for example, knowing they may be replaced by the person they are presenting. Integrity, honesty. Karma is paid back in time. My view anyway.

Posted: Nov 3rd 2010 3:48AM (Unverified) said

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The design sucked, the gameplay sucked, the driving sucked, the shooting sucked, the lag really sucked A LOT.

To be honest I don't know why they all act surprised and hurt when this epic tub of FAIL landed flat on its face. RTW decided to pull a famous MMO technique of letting the consumer pay for an extended beta of the game. They got what they deserved. They did not listen and they blew off the subscriber base input, complaints and just plain old common sense bug fixes.

As bad as it may sound I hope this is a lesson to other MMO companies who want to push out a half a** product out the door to the consumer and then magicaly expect the $$ to fall from the heavens like Mana. Im tired of getting burned by MMO releases by companies that think its ok to deliver a half finished product and charge 50-60$ for an unfinished game.

Posted: Nov 3rd 2010 8:23AM static07 said

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Don't be so narrowminded, enough ppl did like APB despite it flaws. Combat and driving weren't so bad as you make it out to be. Not perfect, but very much playable. You adjust to these flaws over time, I had no problem navigation my car at high speeds through the city at all...

Secondly it has been made very clear that RTW did not intend to push APB out in that state, they simply had little choice and thought that even with the flaws enough subs would have sustained APB to live on and improve over time. It didn't, no developer wants to release a flawed game, if you believe that then you're just thick. If money runs out there are two options, tank it before release or release it and roll with it. They did NOT deserve this, I'm pretty damn sure the 150+ employees were all very passionate about APB and tried their very best, yet everyone makes mistakes.

For everything you buy, there is always the chance it is flawed. They could introduce a sort of ISO-standard for games, though that would apply only a select few AAA releases.

No what bothers me more than flawed games beeing released is that every gamer thinks that he/she knows better than the devs. If so? then proof it.
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