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Posted: Oct 20th 2010 11:08AM (Unverified) said

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Yes I am posting this on an MMO blog. One should never carry a chip on their shoulder for their Video Game non accomplishments. This article promotes this absurdness. I don't expect anyone to agree with me, but, lose the chip as it's unnecessary an undeserved.

Stop creating more stigma for gamers because not all of us take it too far.


Posted: Oct 20th 2010 11:12AM remeran said

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Just because you feel proud of something you've done in an MMO doesn't mean you've taken it too far. Why would it mean that at all? The article isn't saying "Hey, Spend all your time playing an MMO and when you're done be proud of it." it's just saying is there something particularly difficult in the game that you've done and are proud of it. I'm a firm believer of being proud of any achievement big or small, virtual or otherwise. Just cause you're not doesn't mean it's pathetic.
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Posted: Oct 20th 2010 11:32AM Solp said

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Sod off, Troll.
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Posted: Oct 20th 2010 12:38PM Irem said

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Take a step back and consider that you might be promoting this stigma by acting as though saying, "Hell yeah, I finished the mission, go me!" somehow means that you never plan to accomplish anything in real life.

Seriously, if you're so ashamed of your hobby, it might be time to find a different one.
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Posted: Oct 20th 2010 11:15AM happyfish said

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It's not much of an achievement, but it was important to me. I, for the most part, MMO hop, playing the flavor of the month for my free trial, and then move on. In Lotro I found a good home and hitting level cap at the time (60) was awesome. With just a sliver of experience left to level from 59 to 60, I stood at the quest turn in for 15 minutes with goosebumps thinking about the 5 month journey. I almost didnt want to do it because I knew that having a max level character, something that had eluded me in countless other MMOs meant the end of an era.

Pretty much any other achievement pales in the face of how it felt that first time.

Posted: Oct 20th 2010 12:03PM SkyStreak said

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In CoH, I somehow took down a Rikti Dropship.....SOLO!

I was jeust messing around seeing how long it would take to vaporize me when it somehow (maybe by Knockback?) was knocked just enough off course that it kept going in a circle. Then it crashed into a building and exploded.

Obviously a bug, but I still got to see "You have defeated ropship" in my combat window.

Posted: Oct 20th 2010 1:05PM (Unverified) said

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There is a difference between something that makes one proud and something that makes one happy. I am not saying that games should not warrant some kind of emotional response. To say that said game accomplishment made you proud is another story all together.

If I was promoting this stigma, I would be openly proud of my game accomplishments. This is not the case. While accomplishing things in games makes me happy at times, it certainly does not make me proud.

There are things worth being proud about. Graduating college, getting a good job, your babies first steps..... Getting the uber ring of doom in a game just isn't on the same level.

Bragging openly to non gamers about uber ring of doom makes all gamers look bad. If Obama had said he played WoW frequently, he would have lost the election. Gaming in the United States is not highly regarded and for good reason.

Enjoy your games. Let them help you get away and put a smile on your face, but, save being proud for the important things in life.

Posted: Oct 20th 2010 2:11PM (Unverified) said

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More people have graduated college than have beaten the Lick King. Every baby take their first steps, but not all of them can move out of the Defile. Millions of people have jobs, but far less have Kingslayer. Sounds like HLK25 is a bigger accomplishment than anything else

As for a serious response, you seem to think the pride all manifests in the same way. I take some pride in a few of my game achievements. I put work into them and got something that not a lot of people have. That doesn't mean I go brag to other people about what I've done. Pride is a personal feeling, if you only feel pride in something that you can show off to others, that arrogance.

We all understand that were not really Wizards killing Dragons, or Jedi killing Sith or whatever game you happen to play. We are proud of our hobby and don't hide that fact that we enjoy it. That doesn't mean it is the only thing in out life or that we go around shouting about it. You are promoting the stigma be viewing gaming as something that we can't talk about, something to be hidden away, like it's something to be ashamed of. Pride doesn't mean to shout from the rooftops, it just means to believe that something worthwhile was gained, something that you treasure, a memory. I'm proud of a lot of things in my life, gaming included. It's a pity that I can't say the same for you
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Posted: Oct 20th 2010 1:42PM (Unverified) said

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"Bragging openly to non gamers about uber ring of doom makes all gamers look bad."

In case you didn't notice, this website is devoted to gaming. Anyone talking about their accomplishments here is telling other gamers. Your rant would be applicable if this was a social forum that catered to the general public (not that I'm supporting your stance in that situation either), but here, you're just pissing people off and being unnecessarily hypercritical.
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Posted: Oct 20th 2010 2:25PM The Other Chris said

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"While accomplishing things in games makes me happy at times, it certainly does not make me proud."

Then it appears that you play on a more casual level than other people and are only concerned with the most basics of a game, never pushing yourself or playing on the more difficult settings. There are many times one could be proud by playing a video game. Look at the FPS/RTS tournaments, where the winner takes home a nice big check and gets a number of endorsements, and thus free gear. Some people are proud of themselves for completing God of War on God Mode without breaking their controller/television. Heck, some people may just be proud of themselves for completing a game.

Looking at other hobbies, there are a number of achievements that one could be proud of themselves for doing, yet hold no real-world value. Your first model airplane, your first perfect game of bowling, your first goal in *insert sport here*. All of these are great first accomplishments, but hold absolutely zero real world value.

"Gaming in the United States is not highly regarded and for good reason."

To me, this is a problem. People can talk about books, movies, music, sports, etc and nobody thinks anything of it. Yet, talking about a video game brings is frowned upon. Why is that? Looking at the industry as a whole, video games have surpassed that of the movie industry, yet still gets little respect. People complain that video games are violent, yet everyday television has as much, if not more, violence (and sex and language) than many video games.

I can go to work and talk about the Rangers stomping the Yankees, but can't talk about getting the Tyrian Vanquisher title. I can talk about The Good, the Bad and the Ugly, but can't talk about Red Dead Redemption. I can discuss the latest blockbuster movie with a co-worker, but cannot discuss the stories of The Longest Journey or Outcast or Syberia. I can talk about the Star Wars Movies, but not about Knights of the Old Republic or Force Unleashed. And the best of all, Fantasy Football is awesome, but D&D is for geeks and losers.

Me? I'm proud to be a gamer. You? You seem to be a closet gamer, hoping beyond hope that nobody in real life finds out.
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Posted: Oct 20th 2010 4:37PM Irem said

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I have room in my life to be proud of many things. There is no limit to the number of accomplishments one can be proud of, and being proud of one thing does not cancel out pride in another thing. The only time it would be a problem is if someone ONLY took pride in their in-game accomplishments, or refused to try to accomplish anything IRL. While that does happen, lashing out at everyone who expresses pride in something they've done in a game is pretty damn mean-spirited.

Gaming is not arbitrarily set apart from other hobbies. I could just as easily say that it made me "happy" that I downed a certain boss, but if I honestly feel a sense of pride, that's okay. Often that pride comes from knowing that I had the perseverance and dedication to accomplish a goal, or from working well with other people to achieve something. Those are real life values, and the knowledge that we put them to use can stay with us after we've shut off the computer. That's something to take pride in.
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Posted: Oct 20th 2010 1:46PM (Unverified) said

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Reforming a 10-man casual guild in Kara over a year into the BC release into a 25-man raiding guild. It took a tremendous amount of recruiting and coordination to do this successfully when the vast majority of the guild members had never set foot into a 25-man beforehand. We averaged one boss kill per week through SSC & TK and then killed Vashj, pre 3.0, in a mix of T4/T5 gear after about 2 weeks of attempts.

WOTLK was announced two months later and our raiding soon fell apart halfway through BT due to attendance issues, but all of the work leading up to and on Vashj is a great memory for most.

Posted: Oct 20th 2010 2:06PM (Unverified) said

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I wasn't referring to people posting on this blog when I say "Bragging openly to non gamers about uber ring of doom makes all gamers look bad."

I am referring to people who think it is necessary to talk about these things in a non gaming medium.... Like outside of the internet... in public.... You would be surprised how many dbags bring up gaming to random people they meet... Why yes I am in the electronics section.... and no... i don't give a _____ about what you did in some game....

Posted: Oct 20th 2010 2:50PM Djinn said

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For a few people who troll - I mean post - on this site extensively and love to see their own words over and over again and at length, I wish there was such a thing as an "ignore" list so I wouldn't even have to bother scrolling through their posts.
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Posted: Oct 20th 2010 4:43PM Irem said

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The fact that those people might be trying to be friendly and talk to someone who might have an interest in common with them is unsurprisingly lost on you.
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Posted: Oct 20th 2010 4:06PM Heraclea said

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Some years ago, when I still played World of Warcraft, I undertook it on myself to circumnavigate each of the original continents on foot or mount or swimming. This definitely predates the Lich King, and probably Burning Crusade as well; at the time there were no achievements for exploring and no rewards for doing so. There were no draenei or blood elf regions, either, so the only off the trail area was the night elf starting island. For the most part, there's a lot of nothing out there, though I did find some interesting islands south of the western continent. Of course Outland really wasn't susceptible to that kind of exploration, and I don't think the Lich King regions are fully accessible all the way around the way the original two continents are.

Posted: Oct 20th 2010 9:08PM PlasticSpork said

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I soloed to 50 in City of Heroes as a Martial Artist/Super Reflexes character, all without a travel power.

Yeah, I know. Kinda lame.

Posted: Oct 22nd 2010 7:31AM (Unverified) said

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I take your response about the line that seperates the gaming world from the 'real' world, but doing something for enjoyment is the same regardless of what you do.

I play football, I coach football and I like to game, wouldn't ever say I'm a hardcore gamer, heck I've hardly ever completed a game on anything but 'normal' difficulty because I just don't have the time, or the blood pressure medication to be able to handle doing something like Call of Duty or Halo on Legendary for example.

I do recall a sense of pride the first time that my guild and I felled Ragnaros in the vanilla WoW. That was an achievement which we all shared and we still talk about to this day, took us like 100 attempts which is like 4 hours a run just to get to him and then to try and take him down.

Now; I and the others involved in this are proud of this achievement, and to us this is an achievement, however I wouldn't expect anyone outside of that group; or the gaming community as a whole to understand or feel the same level of gratification at completing that particular milestone.

Nor would anyone understand my pain at missing Saving Private Ryan at the cinema and seeing it for the first time on a crappy 18" sony TV at my mates flat thinking to myself "Boy I've missed out here, the big screen would have made this an experience and not just something else that I've 'seen'".

Achievements and things to be proud of are personal, as the blog stated right at the start - in some form or another - you should never judge yourself by someone elses yardstick, it's a pointless and fruitless pursuit, they'll never understand your achievements and they'll never get yours.

However I take your point about graduating college and seeing your childs first steps - something I'm yet to see - these are things to be truely PROUD of, and hold weight in the real world.

But there is space for gaming achievements, my gripe is with the way in which you have approached your arguement is that it's wrong to be proud of putting time into something which is important to you and not feeling happy about achieving it.

It's a personal thing, there is no weight in commenting on whether something should hold a level of enjoyment for one person over the next, just because you're not happy or proud to have accomplished something in a game please do not look down on others who do feel some small pang of enjoyment at acomplishing something in the virtual world.

There is a sygma about gaming and that it is a waste of time, but it's a personal thing, I see cricket for example as a waste of time, I see gardnening as a waste of time, but I'd never belittle anyone who thought that making a century of runs in cricket wasn't an achievement, I can see the merit in it, it's just not something I would aspire to.

Nor having a nice and pristine garden with lovely flower beds, people spend months doing it, and they have every right to be proud of it, the difference is that society as a whole deems it as a worthwhile pursuit where as gaming is seen as a waste of time.

Posted: Oct 22nd 2010 7:34AM (Unverified) said

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Can anyone tell I'm bored at work...?

Posted: Oct 28th 2010 11:44PM godot9 said

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My WoW achievements compare poorly to the old school personal achievements where there was no fancy title, achievement ding, or link. Just the personal satisfaction of completing the 9th Koldain Prayer Shawl in EQ1 - largely through soloing and 6 months of real time. lol. Wife took me out to dinner to celebrate since she wouldn't have to hear about it anymore.

Chechen, 67 Erudite Necro

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