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Reader Comments (14)

Posted: Oct 18th 2010 3:56PM eNTi said

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this

Posted: Oct 18th 2010 4:03PM Controlled Chaos said

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And people honestly wonder why identity theft is becoming such a massive issue. It's a goldmine for thieves and privacy violations don't help matters in the least. And it'll never fix because, as Tempes above said, they'll just figure out a way to hide it better next time.

Posted: Oct 18th 2010 4:08PM Liltawen said

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That's why I never post there. People jumping on the Social bandwagon just have no concept of internet security.

Posted: Oct 18th 2010 5:31PM Qehb said

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Oh great another reason to continue not to have a facebook account.

Posted: Oct 18th 2010 5:50PM RogueJedi86 said

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"The Journal discovered that each of the top 10 Facebook applications transmits user IDs, which may be shared with unauthorized third parties."

"Facebook is nonetheless trotting out the damage control PR. "We have taken immediate action to disable all applications that violate our terms," said a company spokeman."

So does this mean Facebook is disabling ALL of its Top 10 Facebook Applications? Somehow I doubt they'd do that. Maybe they'll just change their terms so their top 10 apps don't violate them anymore.

Posted: Oct 18th 2010 6:03PM GaaaaaH said

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That marketing spin was useless. They may have disables applications that violate the terms, but these apps are probably working inside the terms.

A more cynical viewpoint it to say that the terms probably just say that facebook needs a cut. /conspiracy
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Posted: Oct 18th 2010 6:33PM M1sterLee said

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OF COURSE THEY ARE.

When are people going to get the idea that Facebook = goodbye to any privacy you or your 'friends' might have had online. This isn't some conspiracy theory, it's a fact that companies are set up to farm the personal info out of Facebook and sell it on for marketing and other purposes.

Posted: Oct 18th 2010 7:01PM (Unverified) said

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I'm one of the apathetic people because if there's something I want to keep private, then why would I post it on Facebook?

People enjoy bashing the privacy loopholes of Facebook (and there are many, no doubt about it) but never look into the security loopholes that are in other areas of computing.

Anything done socially (online), whether it be chatting with someone via an instant messenger or chatroom, or playing online games, are open to the same privacy risks as Facebook. These things can have as many loopholes, if not more, than Facebook. Your phone line is never 100% secure, and talking to someone face to face isn't secure either.

Literally NOTHING is sacred anymore. Nothing is safe or "protected" from anything for very long. If someone really wants to find out information about you, they can and they will.

Besides, those who use Facebook (myself included) should realise the risks that Facebook imposes on it's users. One of the people who worked on Facebook said he's apathetic to peoples privacy - ultimately, it's up to you, the user, to check into the security settings and privacy policies of the applications you use.

Posted: Oct 19th 2010 2:42AM eLdritchZ said

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true, not going to dispute that.

On the other hand even my grandmother has a facebook account and she doesn't even know how to change the time and date settings in windows...

People who use irc chats or play online games (especially MMOs) are VERY VERY different from your average facebook user.

Frankly, the more I read about Facebook, their unethical methods, their apps and the unethical methods of the app makers, the more it all disgusts me.

This is not the Internet I loved so much when I grew up, it's turning into the outside world which I'm trying to escape when going online.... ironic =/
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Posted: Oct 19th 2010 4:05AM (Unverified) said

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I don't like Facebook's methods anymore than you do and would, quite frankly, stop using it if it weren't for the fact that it's one of few ways to get in touch with friends.

Whilst I sympathise for your grandmother (my parents and sisters are the same) it doesn't matter, in the end. Facebook isn't the only site to not display it's policies easily, nor is it the only site to not have any sort of guides relating to protecting said privacy. Unfortunately, very few sites (that save personal data) actually have such "guides" and you generally have to search the general net for any data relating to such (and the average Facebook user isn't going to do that, are they?).

I'm not defending Facebook, but what I am saying is that no other application (that stores personal details) is any safer. The only safe ones are the ones that don't store personal data on the servers to begin with, and the decent ones are the ones that have privacy guides but there aren't many of those, as stated.
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Posted: Oct 19th 2010 2:00PM (Unverified) said

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Perhaps you should read my post before telling me what to do?

I believe I said I was one of those apathetic people. I don't care because I'm not idiotic enough to post the degree of personal details that many do on Facebook. Many of my Facebook "friends" are purely online friends, therefore I don't go out and share my cellphone number or address on the site, that'd be stupid.

My point still stands: Facebook is just as safe as -any other site-. Refuse to believe me all you like. I never denied what they did is illegal and unethical, but thinking they're the only people who do is ignorant.
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Posted: Oct 19th 2010 2:10PM (Unverified) said

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I should add that Facebook are only one half of the problem: They are the half that manages their site in illegal and unethical ways. People, however, know this. It has been stated numerous times in the past, I've even read articles on it.

I'm apathetic because the only problem I have with Facebook is it's privacy concerns, and that's not much of a problem for me. Other than that, the service the site provides is decent, it does what it's supposed to do.

Facebook don't dictate what you post, they dictate what you see and share. Keep that in mind when posting your next status update. -You- the user decide what information is posted, if you know that Facebook has loopholes in the privacy then stop posting anything that could compromise that security.

It isn't hard, people don't do it not because they don't want to but because they're ignorant. Don't accuse me of being ignorant because I'm smart enough to still use Facebook but not be a dumbass about it.
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Posted: Oct 19th 2010 6:08PM (Unverified) said

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"Facebook often disobeys its own rules, thus it is not as safe as other sits which obey their own legal rules for fear of prosecution."

Facebook can't disobey their own rules for they make the rules. You obviously don't like Facebook but rather than complain about it's privacy loopholes on Massively, how about you do something about it?

I could, I suppose, but I don't care enough to bother doing so. You're the one trying to convince me it's got bad policies when I, and most other people reading this article, already know it do.

Posted: Oct 19th 2010 11:05PM (Unverified) said

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I still don't know why you're telling me all this.

Facebook not obeying their own rules, or being paid off to allow third-party corporations to "break" their rules (like in this article) is nothing new to me, it's nothing new to a lot of companies.

Sure, many companies fear the legal ramifications, others know that if they get caught then they've got the cash to bribe the system and walk away scot-free.

As I said before, I'm not the person you should be telling this to, nor anyone else reading this article, since we already know. The problem isn't the information not being out there, it's people not wanting to listen.

I'm apathetic for my own privacy but that doesn't mean I don't want others privacy protected.
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