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Reader Comments (10)

Posted: Oct 3rd 2010 4:43PM (Unverified) said

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I like the "N$A" acronym they use for "No Cash Advantage".

Posted: Oct 3rd 2010 4:55PM Birk said

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So a few days ago, when I discovered Minecraft on Massively, I pretty much had my mind blown. I bought it immediately and have loved it ever since.

Now neverdaunt is starting to....well...tempt me.

I have a major gripe; with limited playtime, how am I -ever- going to enjoy so much intense sandboxiness?

-Birk

Posted: Oct 3rd 2010 5:12PM Beau Hindman said

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This is a good question, and something I struggle with all the time now. As in constantly. :) For me, it comes down to organization. It sucks to have to take something as wonderful as gaming and turn it into an (decently) oiled machine, but that's what it takes when time is an issue.

5-10 years ago, you would simply play as soon as you got home, and played until sunrise. Now, most of us that were playing 10 years ago have different goals or responsibilities, even if we have plenty of time. Ironically, I don't have the energy to play so many games in one evening as I need to, so I have to organize. I make small goals of something like "hit level 10" or "craft that armor" -- easily obtainable goals.

This is the allure and reason behind the success of FTP: there is no time running out, there is no ticking financial clock. With no up-front cost and no monthly fee, you can afford to let the game sit there for an evening or two while you do other things, or play other games.

I guess just always keep in mind that there is no rush, and no one breathing down your neck. Take your time, and set a few basic goals. At least, that's what works for me when playing games that I am not required to play for an article. :)

Beau
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Posted: Oct 3rd 2010 5:44PM Bhagpuss said

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This is the problem I'm having. All the buzz around Minecraft and the sandbox vibe is beginning to bug me.

The phrase that keeps haunting me is "in my day we made our own entertainment". I hear it in the background of all the discussions on what's wrong with today's MMOs and what's so great about the 8bit/lo-fi/indie sandbox wave.

Frankly, I don't want to make my own entertainment. I want to be entertained. Idon't want to come home from work and get out my virtual shovel and dig a virtual hole. There's MORE than enough wrong with my real-life house that I could be working on if it comes to that.

The ironic thing is, back when I first began playing MMOs in 1999 I would have LOVED this kind of gameplay. It would have been exactly what I was looking for. But I'm not 40 years old any more and I don't have the will, the energy or the interest to do my own landscaping.

I'm glad this wave of games is coming through. It's a much-needed alternative. But it's too late for me, I think. I do want really pretty pictures and funny dialog and most of the heavy lifting done for me. Fortunately I think that's still where the mainstream is going to be for a long time. Maybe we'll all finally be able to get what we want. That'd be sweet.

Posted: Oct 3rd 2010 8:30PM Tizmah said

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Hmm, this kind of relates to your point. Back in the day, I thoroughly enjoyed Ultima Online. Expansive world and you basically did whatever you wanted, not an entire objective based structure like most games today. However, I've played multiple games since those early years that tried to replicate that sandbox feeling and it just hasn't captured me sense. I now think to myself, was I just imagining and being stupid that I liked it? Was UO actually not good and I was being a stupid little kid? But..In the words of Angry Video Game Nerd on his Hydlide review, he mentioned how the cryptic things in it pissed him off so bad. However, he mentions that The Legend of Zelda also had it's fair share cryptic stuff as well and was highly successful. Conclusion was that it was because Zelda was simply better designed and engaging.

A lot of sandbox MMO games these days really lack engagement and honestly, the lot of them happen to very buggy and ugly.
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Posted: Oct 5th 2010 6:07PM (Unverified) said

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I mean really, who brags they're in a HEAVY ROCK BAND.

Posted: Oct 3rd 2010 10:58PM (Unverified) said

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I have no idea what was going on in that video, but it looked really quirky and fun.

A good first impression to read, thank you.

Posted: Oct 4th 2010 10:57AM (Unverified) said

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What's next? A side-scroller MMO?! :)

Posted: Oct 4th 2010 11:11AM cforciea said

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Why is it that 8-bit these days gets used to mean games made with chiptune music and pixels/voxels? I'm willing to let the whole 3d rendering thing slide, but some of those screenshots use more colors than would be available in an entire 8-bit game even using palette swapping (and ignore several more important limitations of working with an 8-bit system besides). It seems like a disservice to the ingenuity of the designers who actually had to deal with limitations like tiles that could only have 3 colors per scanline and hard limits of 8x16 pixels on sprites to try to put games like this in the same category.

Posted: Oct 26th 2010 7:58PM (Unverified) said

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As a player of this game, I wonder how you could not figure it out. Everyone helps if you ask for clarification on a subject. Just to clear things up, you don't attack red shrines, you attack shrines in a vulnerable time called Static, but if the cell enters build then no dice. The shrines you need to attack switch between the two modes (5 minutes minimum static, 30 minutes build), and you can see the time a cell has before switching modes on the information bar in the upper right-hand corner.

Another thing, those special swords you saw probably weren't special at all. Because it is N$A, those were probably just for looks. I'd guess you saw the flame sword at some point. However, there are special weapons in the game called "epics," including the elusive Tommay's Sword which does much more damage than a regular sword, but the epics are elusive and difficult to keep track of (as you lose them on logout and death and there's only 1 epic of each type in the game. And these people are good at hiding stuff.)

Also, the fact that you couldn't get to Tronics, which act as a sort of visual programming language that can move and change the environment, was a shame. Very fun, if I may say so myself. I made a system that lets you send people messages in game while they are offline. It actually makes programming sort of fun to learn.

Perhaps next time you choose to do a story you should contact me to show you the ropes. It would probably be more fun if you knew what you were doing. I'm on the forums at http://8bit.neverdaunt.com/forums under the username fedora80, and online I'm called Fedora. I hope you come back for more, I think that you'll find Neverdaunt more addictive than Minecraft if you spend some time with it ;)

PS: They're just called monsters in this game. Not Mobs. Wrong game.

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