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Reader Comments (30)

Posted: Sep 10th 2010 12:01PM Controlled Chaos said

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I'm seldom a guild type myself either. Personally, I just can't stand the types who end up in both sides of the spectrum. Casual guilds tend to let in people who are immature and I generally can't stand. Hardcore guilds tend to let in people who are entirely too set on the game to the point of being obsessive. I fall in the middle, so I definitely end up out in the cold a lot of the time.

All in all though? It doesn't matter. Guilds will do what they want to, because no matter how stringent or difficult a guild is to get into, people will try anyways just to try to be deemed 'elite'. Applications can be involved as they want, it's just a matter of how much abuse a player will take before they either get in, get turned away or get sick of it.

Posted: Sep 10th 2010 12:17PM Hjordis said

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I've been in a couple guilds that required an application process and sometimes they end up being good guilds who are just trying to get to know their new members and the app is more a formality. However there was one guild in particular that not only had an extensive application process, there was a minimum play requirement, weekly "squadron" meetings- the guild was actually subdivided into squadrons lol- and vent was required at all times. I'm in the military irl, the last last thing I want in my favorite hobby is an overimportant paramilitary group of people telling me what to do :(

On the other hand, I feel its important to establish a potential member's age and what time they play, at the least. Leaders do need to make sure that new members will be able to get along and that they will have others to play with.

Posted: Sep 10th 2010 12:19PM pixledriven said

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I think applications have a place..

If you're posting a recruitment thread on a game forum, then an application makes sense in a way. "Hey, here's what we're about, go here and tell us you're interested." Basically it keeps you from having to log in and hope to find the recruiter online and available.

If you're in-game, however. I'm with tyrrin. Don't tell me to go to an external website and fill out a form. We're here, if you want to 'get to know me' lets group up and do some stuff.

Posted: Sep 10th 2010 12:26PM (Unverified) said

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I've been a guild member, an office (on a few occasions) and a guild leader, taking over (with another person) leading a guild when the original leader moved on to a raiding guild. We ended up merging with another guild, but there was mainly so we were big enough to cater to both raiders and more casual players, though that's always a compromise that will lead to some becoming unhappy.

I think you have to have some sort of application and vetting process in place. You owe it to the people already in the guild to avoid inviting people in who will reduce their enjoyment of the game. That doesn't mean that the process has to be involved, I usually just asked them to post an introduction on the guild forum and then group with them (or get another officer or someone else who I think is a good judge of character) to play with them a little. Then I'll invite them in on a probationary period of a few weeks if they aren't totally unsuitable. I'm a pretty laid back person, and so you'd have a be really dysfunctional/immature to be turned away before getting to the probation stage. It's really up to the rest of the guild if the person stays. Piss off enough people and you're out..

Once they are in they can play as little or as often as they want as far as I'm concerned or have as many alts as they like, though this really depends on the game, as some make it real hard to identify who is who.

As long as they aren't just there in name is all I ask.

Posted: Sep 20th 2010 1:00AM (Unverified) said

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Applications are silly. While they can be informative, they are far from an honest look at a person's personality and performance which are the two most important factors to consider when playing a game together for any amount of time.

I never join guilds that require serious applications. It's a waste of my time. And when I run guilds (as I currently do) I don't require potential members to fill out apps. I prefer they run some dungeons with the rest of us and join us in Skype or Vent so we can find out if we work well together. If we don't they leave or we kick em. It's as simply as that.

Posted: Sep 10th 2010 1:52PM (Unverified) said

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for me, i'm a fan of guild apps... depending on the guild. if it's just a simple/casual leveling guild with no real expectations of it's members, then there isn't much point in an application process. if, however, the guild has expectations of the membership... such as a progression raiding guild in WoW, then sure... some effort to qualify a new member should be made.

for my part, being sent to an outside website to fill in a 5-10 question application is a test of the applicants dedication to the guild. if we are trying to do 25 man progression through end game raids, then every single member of the guild is important and we do expect consistent attendance. by having the app and stating these conditions, we save everyone a lot of head ache down the road. the application knows what is expected in advance and it is up to him/her to decide the level of involvement.

Posted: Sep 10th 2010 3:06PM DeadlyAccurate said

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I run a corporation in EVE, and all I do is let them in without any real access, wait and see how they act in fleets and chat, then decide if I want to give them the limited access other members have or boot them. So far I haven't had to boot anyone, but our corp is also very small.

The only other guild I've ever joined is in EQ2, on one of their PvP servers. It's a zerg guild, no criteria, but they never ask anything of anyone, and it's big enough that you're likely to get a certain level of protection in a zone simply because other guildmates are probably around.

Posted: Sep 10th 2010 4:00PM Alph said

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I'm surprised that no one has brought up how it's really easy to lie on guild apps.

The last time I ran a guild, I noticed this happened quite a bit. People would give the answers they thought we'd want to hear and then, after getting whatever short term gains they wanted, they'd leave for another place to pillage.

What made this worst is that the other guilds didn't care about the warnings I'd give them about the player and really were more happy that they were bringing the gear over than anything.

I'm still in favor of guild apps, however I think they need to be taken with a large grain of salt and that a probationary period is a better action to take.

Posted: Sep 10th 2010 4:02PM x0fx3 said

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I've cofounded the first guild I ever joined, created my second guild and joined a 3rd. I say it all depends on what you want. Most people come and go eventually.
The last guild I joined I am one of 3 remaining members who's membership has surpassed the sort of randomness of guilds. We are friends now, the best of friends we talk regularly on teamspeak, email, text and even call each other. I would say those two are among my best friends we share everything about our lives. Of course it didn't start out that way, but it did start somewhere. I'm really glad I joined that guild (4+ years ago) It was a roleplay guild that did Player Driven Events in MxO we did ARG type stuff like the Cobra Lounge website.

Posted: Sep 10th 2010 9:01PM Scarecrowe said

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My favorite guild was based on humor & personality. Our requirement was that an applicant hung with us for 2 weeks (preferably with voice but we worked around) while we got to know them and they got to know us. Two weeks might seem to be long but we figured this was a fair medium to have the majority of members meet them and figure out if we all meshed properly. We had a public and private forums. On our private forums, we had an intro post explaining the new applicant (and their sponsor, if they had one) and invited a discussion of the mutual fitness. The posts usually ended up being a story of some ridiculous group adventure of the night before and were almost always great humor. Any member who wanted their voice heard on the matter would chime in with a yea/nay and at the end of the two weeks, we'd have a tally up. In my estimation, over 90% of the folks who had "survived" our humor for two weeks were welcomed in. Our group was always close-knit and protective so we outlasted our game(s) and developed some long-lasting friendships in and out. We regularly search for a MMO to bring us together again but as of late, we're scattered out among four or five. It looks like SWTOR may be our next big home.

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