| Mail |
You might also like: WoW Insider, Joystiq, and more

Reader Comments (58)

Posted: Sep 8th 2010 6:38PM Kroktar said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
Guild Wars is a CORPG, or Competitive/Cooperative Online Role Playing Game developed for Windows by ArenaNet and published by NCsoft.

http://wiki.guildwars.com/wiki/Guild_Wars

its not a MMORPG.

Posted: Sep 9th 2010 4:02AM (Unverified) said

  • 3 hearts
  • Report
You are wrong. MMORPG is a bigger "umbrella" and it falls under that. Sure you can choose to call it something else to define it further but like the article meant to explain here it doesn't have to be a WoW-clone to deserve to be called an MMO.
Reply

Posted: Sep 8th 2010 6:47PM Avick said

  • Half a heart
  • Report
I'm sorry, but I believe you forgot to actually define the term MMORPG. Instead you outlined why you're so incapable of doing so.

Posted: Sep 8th 2010 6:52PM Beau Hindman said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
For the record, I said I was going to attempt to define it. In the end, I spoke of my inability to do so. Then, I ask for help.

So, what do *you* think it means?

Beau
Reply

Posted: Sep 8th 2010 7:21PM Leala said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
I believe the point is to start a discussion on a topic rather than to have the author do all the thinking for you.
Reply

Posted: Sep 9th 2010 1:43PM Fakeassname said

  • 2.5 hearts
  • Report
MMO-RPG:

Mass Market Oriented - Repetitive Profit Genre.

I dare anyone to try to disprove that!
Reply

Posted: Sep 9th 2010 1:51PM Beau Hindman said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
"Mass Market Oriented - Repetitive Profit Genre. I dare anyone to try to disprove that!"

I won't attempt to disprove that, I will *embrace* that. It has to be a mass market genre -- thus the massively part. Repetitive profit? Again, you are pointing more to the obvious. Call me crazy, but I prefer a vibrant, varied, and yes, wealthy industry. That means people are employed, and more games are made.

The more games are made, the more I have to talk about, enjoy, and share.

Thanks for the comment! :)

Beau
Reply

Posted: Sep 10th 2010 12:17AM Fakeassname said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
lol, I was more leaning towards mass market oriented = game complexity dumbed down to the point of knuckle dragging simple.

+

Repettive profit Genre = selling one product multiple times to the same person.


most MMO's are borderline asexually androgynous with their game mechanics because for every game style you embrace you will alienate another. fast twitch FPS's usually don't appeal to the fans of TBS, racing game enthusiasts are hardly ever caught shelling out for a plot driven RPG. mmo's take virtually every aspect of core videogame mechanics and sanitizes them to prevent players who prefer an opposing element will not be alienated. if the overarching game element of mmos had to be classified it would probably be defined as "babysitting" or maybe "supervisory" would be a better buzzword.

there's plenty of action, there's plenty of events, there's plenty running around, but almost none of it is actually done by the player. just think about how 90% of the movement in mmo's is handled, shure most games have an option for WASD piloting, but in almost all situations it's more effective to click on the ground to tell your character where you want them to be. that's not really controlling your character, it's more of micromanagement.

as far as the repetitive profit thing goes: marketing a mmo essentially boils down to making a game once then selling it over and over again to a customer (VS the normal method where in you make a product them sell it once per player). it's true that consumers don't exactly come away from the deal empty handed, but it's undeniable that it's the game's producers are the ones who walk away with the long end of the stick.

note: I said "PRODUCERS", I don't think that players are the top dogs in the deal, but it's probably the developers who get shafted the most. they only get paid one games worth money, just like the non-mmo, yet the producers sell said game over and over again.

I'm posting here so obviously I too partake of the mmo, but i refuse to pay a monthly sub for anything (F2P and expansion driven is how I roll). people have tried to justify paying subs to me as "well, you'd just be spending as much if not more on multiple games throughout the year" and my response is "yeah, but the difference is that I'm getting an entirely new game every two to three months instead of buying the same game four times!".

but the blade cuts both ways and you do have valid points, beau ... so touche on me. I still find it funny that when ever a game ditches the androgynous game mechanics it gets relabeled mmo-fps, or mmo-tbs when in fact it's the "mmo" part that's being displaced, so they should be FPS-RPG's, FPS-TBS, and Racing-RPG's.

lol, I understand why that dosen't happen (acronym fail) so I like to use the term popularized by NWN and think of everything branded "mmo" as persistent worlds, or better yet persistent environments and then it's easier to correctly label things: PE-FPS, PE-FPS, PE-hello kitty.
Reply

Posted: Sep 8th 2010 6:55PM (Unverified) said

  • 1 heart
  • Report
I think any game where you play with more than 3 other people simultaneously online counts as a mmo.

What's more important is how you pronounce it. Muh-mor-pu-guh.

Posted: Sep 8th 2010 7:10PM Monkey D Luffy said

  • 2.5 hearts
  • Report
So what your saying is that every multiplayer game is an MMO? Lol.
Reply

Posted: Sep 8th 2010 9:07PM (Unverified) said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
If it's multiplayer online, yes it is. I agree with Shackle's definition.

If you disagree, then what's the minimum number of players required before it deserves the "Massively" title? 100? 1,000? One million?
Reply

Posted: Sep 9th 2010 7:01AM Fabius Bile said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
@SirNiko, for starters, the possibility of someone you dont know or ever heard of, stepping in front of you.

multiplayer games based in closed instances to which noone can ever walk into except those who started it, fail to be massive from the ground up.

I can accept games where such instances exist to some extend but still there is an open world where everybody can meet everybody. games 101% revolving around that instances? nuh-uh, not massive AT ALL.
Reply

Posted: Sep 8th 2010 7:01PM Joshua Przygocki said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
Personally I think it means a persistent online world with players interacting outside of "matches"(like Call of Duty or Team Fortress 2). MMOs should usually include some depth with RPG elements.

While MW2 has a crapton of players and is online, I would not count it as an MMO because it's not a persistent world, and it's set up with servers for fairly small matches, whereas something like Global Agenda has, for one, some RPG elements and depth, at least more so than any Call of Duty game out there. It also has a somewhat persistent world and allows for more player interaction aside from shooting each other.

Posted: Sep 8th 2010 7:18PM (Unverified) said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
I think one thing that makes an MMO feel like an MMO is scale. If I'm at point A standing on a hill and I see a light house off in the distance at point B can I go to it? If yes then in my opinion that is the "Massive" part of the experience.

Then when I get to point B is there anything there? If it's just an empty area just placed there to look good in the distance it fulfills half the equation. If when I get to the light house there's something there that can kill me and ruin my day then the second part of the acronym comes into play. Multiplayer requires the lack of instances in order to facilitate the possibility of socializing. This means by todays standard one large channel where the general populace can banter back and forth, forge friendships or deep loathing hatreds. I think developers lop off an arm when they have multiple instances with multiple chat channels of "general" and "trade".

In regards to the RPG portion what modern game does not require you to empathize with a character and take on their role yourself? I can't think of any. Even if you look at Katamari, you ARE the ball by rolling around you're doing the ball's job. So in essence, you're role playing.

Posted: Sep 8th 2010 7:32PM (Unverified) said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
Hey Hey

Does it even mater anymore what it means? Every one is going to give some different definition based on how they feel. There are not gonna be any facts to back up any assertion despite what you find on a wiki. Hell people can not agree on what Role Playing is, let alone what constitutes massively.

However i will steal from the philosopher Douglas Adams, when he was asked what is the secret to the universe. Forty Two.....

Welcome Home
Rev

Posted: Sep 8th 2010 7:33PM doublerainbow said

  • 3 hearts
  • Report
Massively. This means that the game world and options to play in this game world are many, and the world is very big. They are in effect massive and much bigger then the typical console game which typically can be beat in a few casual days of play. This at times can also mean console or PC (or both types) games that have massive worlds, but they do not meet the prerequisites of the rest of the MMORPG terminology. I would argue that this also means that everything in the game world is massive or has a large and epic feel to it.

Multiplayer. This simply means that there is more then one player in the game with you at any time, or the option to have more then one player up to X players the servers will support in any given space within the game exists at any time.

Online. This means that the game is in a constant 24 hour state of availability online and accessible at all times except for maintenance days. You must have an internet connection of a predetermined speed to be able to play the game with minimal issues. The main point is that the game remains accessible at all times even if no one is on the server it still remains accessible!

Roleplaying. In its most simple sense this means that you are taking on the role of a character in a given situation and given certain predetermined variables. If you play COD you are RP'ing as an elite warrior in its most basic sense. This is not limited to just games labeled as RPG's. Rather in an MMORPG the RP element is expanded on in greater detail then in other games, also giving players many more options for their avatars they choose to play, as well as more consquences your character may face.. These variables could include faction, race, class, and even specializations depending on how the MMO is set up. RP also has a predefined lore that set the basis for the story to grow on.

Game. This is a given.

You put all that together and you have an MMORPG. Just one element of the MMO market, as there are also MMOFPS, MMORTS, and perhaps more MMO's available to play in an rich and new expanding market.

Posted: Sep 8th 2010 7:48PM hansh0tfirst said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
If there isn't excessive lag, I can't grief a noobie fresh out of character creation, and being competitive doesn't require 40+ hours a week of mindless, repetitive grinding... it's not an MMORPG.

See? It's easy to define.

Posted: Sep 8th 2010 7:57PM doublerainbow said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
That has more to do with playstyle choice then definition. Also, what the MMORPG requires as part of its gameplay has more to do with design decision rather then the definition of what an MMORPG is.


Reply

Posted: Sep 8th 2010 7:54PM cdave said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
Massively modifies the term multiplayer, although there aren't (and probably shouldn't be) games that are just a Massively Online RPG.

Defining the phrase though, I'd say massively multiplayer means that in a persistent game world, a player uses random encounters and interactions with other players to form social bonds to achieve personal as well as mutual goals with their player character, without the assistance of a secondary matchmaking system.

Although I do believe any game that is defined as such will blur the line at some point.

Posted: Sep 8th 2010 7:56PM Jeromai said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
I shall give it a shot.

Typically, an MMO involves you controlling an avatar, using either a first or third-person camera (often both), that can be developed in power over time (the mislabeled roleplaying aspect.) There has to be the potential to interact with a playerbase that numbers in the hundreds, thousands, tens of thousands, though I would take a stab at "more than 4 people" for 'massive' group content since most co-op games go with four as a nice number for interaction.

To separate this from the FPSes which have taken on increasingly RPG aspects of leveling up, I would add in the lore and virtual world aspect of an MMO. It's important for an MMO to attempt the immersive portrayal of a whole different virtual world, often fantasy-based, in their maps and level layouts. FPSes tend to produce more disjointed, unconnected, generic maps detailing certain territories and interesting terrain. MMOs tend to tie their maps to specific features in a world and should create the illusion of connectivity between maps, that one can travel from place to place.

Featured Stories

Engadget

Engadget

Joystiq

Joystiq

WoW Insider

WoW

TUAW

TUAW