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Reader Comments (21)

Posted: Aug 8th 2010 6:58PM Hurbster said

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Lovely, now you said something about good guys ? I find them much more interesting, seeing as they are pretty much 'against the grain' from the perspective of an outsider looking into the Eve Universe.

Posted: Aug 8th 2010 8:35PM Brendan Drain said

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What I find interesting is that while there are people like those featured above, they're vastly outnumbered by good people willing to help their fellow players. Chribba, Winterblink, every member of the CSM, the people who run training programmes like EVE University and players who write guides on the forum, for example. I think it shows that in a universe where it's possible to be a complete low-life, people generally prefer to be nice to each other.
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Posted: Aug 8th 2010 10:38PM Dblade said

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The CSM really don't do that much to help other players as help themselves. Getting a free trip to Iceland is probably the main draw. E-Uni helps themselves more than helping new players, with a 90% tax rate. Same with Agony, it's not help when you pay for it as a service. Most of the examples you list are out of game: I challenge you to list one single anti-pirate corp that has done anything newsworthy in the past year.

The game is very much for the yarrtard, and while individual people may help in it, they never get much notice or respect.

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Posted: Aug 9th 2010 2:23AM smg77 said

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I'm a current member of E-Uni and the tax rate is 7.5% (seven point five...not seventy five). No idea where the ridiculous 90% idea came from. The tax rate had been 5% for the longest time and was just raised to 7.5% which is still less than NPC corps.

Other than the tax there are no fees for E-Uni classes or services. All members are reimbursed for all skill books under 1 million isk, free frigates and T1 mods are available to anybody, classes are scheduled throughout the week and the chat channel is full of helpful people who realize that E-Uni caters to noobs and doesn't respond harshly to noob questions.

I've never been a member of Agony and never attended any of their classes but the above poster has no idea what he's talking about when it comes to E-Uni.
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Posted: Aug 9th 2010 6:19AM kasapina said

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The tax is 90% only during wars, to prevent the members of the corporation from mining or doing other non-warfare activities. This is done so there aren't any easy targets roaming around - everyone leaves the university and those who stay form zerg fleets and do combat training on the corp that is wardeccing them.
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Posted: Aug 8th 2010 7:55PM (Unverified) said

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The only good guys I can think of are the high sec miners.

Posted: Aug 8th 2010 8:05PM Freakydemon said

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Seems this game is pretty deep... Anyway hoping to see a special on some good guys next :p

Posted: Aug 9th 2010 7:59AM (Unverified) said

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I believe there has been a special on good guys some time ago... Anyway, I already know of two good guys, Chribba and Cat O'Ninetails. Though I'm not certain exactly what Cat is doing, it seems she and her corporation are trying to keep the system of Rancer and a few systems around it free from piracy. I don't know how well that is faring, because I have never been in Rancer or systems surrounding it, but it's a noble purpose nonetheless.

Chribba, however, has made himself famous as one of the most reliable people in EVE. For a few years now he has acted as a third-party to prevent scams such as Miz Cenuij pulls them off. It usually works like this: both parties contact Chribba over a sale, Chribba determines how much money he wants for his services and is paid (this usually depends on the value of the item being sold, but it is generally not more than a few million, which is cheap for any EVE player dealing with items so valuable he needs a third-party), the buyer gives Chribba the money, the seller gives the buyer the item, then Chribba gives the seller the money. And that's only one of the things Chribba has done; he is also the creator of such websites as EVE Files, where people can upload all their EVE-related files such as screenshots or gameplay footage.
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Posted: Aug 8th 2010 10:43PM DrewIW said

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Surprised you didn't mention Awox. He's so infamous that his name has become a verb.

Posted: Aug 9th 2010 1:56AM eNTi said

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sad thing is... you need to endure the boredom of eve online to get to the point of "building your own story". it's nice, how people try to emphasize this so called "sandbox", when you can really do this in every social environment. this has almost nothing to do with the game mechanic and everything to do with the way players perceive games as serious and not fun any more.

Posted: Aug 9th 2010 4:56AM Psychotic Storm said

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I don't think there is a sandbox in EVE, what there is, is a playground without a sandbox that bullies rain supreme and if you want to try one of the games in the playground, you have to hope that either there is no bully around, you evade him, or that you are a bigger/ more numerous bully than him.

but there is no sandbox.
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Posted: Aug 9th 2010 8:06AM Xilmar said

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EVE is a sandbox game. Most of the people who disagree do not know what a sandbox really is. You'd be mistaken to think that games like GTA are the only type of sandbox out there.

A sandbox game is pretty much like a real sandbox...You have a limited, non-linear amount of physical space where the valid path from point A to point B can be more than one. The path can represent anything from travel or completing missions to acquiring in game money for any profession (mining, missioning, ratting, etc.), market trading/manipulation or piracy.
And in EVE everything you do can be more or less profitable, risky, time consuming, active/passive, etc. It basically allows every single player to choose their own destination and route to it.

There's no hand holding, you're by default special gameplay. The devs supply the terrain and a fairly small set of game rules, compared to other MMOs, and from there on players make the rules. And that's what a sandbox game is...freedom of choice. they just took it one step further, that's all.

And that's why the good guys or bad guys in eve are awesome. In wow a first kill is basically a group of extremely good players in a very limited environment with a precise set of strict rules. they walk in the footsteps that the devs created. In eve a lot of players are known because they did something new, without someone telling them it can be done. They grew some balls, HTFU and rose above most other players.
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Posted: Aug 9th 2010 4:14PM Psychotic Storm said

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That's a main issue definition.

To be honest I never played GTA and don't know the GTA's sandbox.

I do know that for me a sandbox allows me to build whatever I want and play whatever I want.

here come a few problems with EVE, first you cannot be left alone, the universe isn't big enough to hide from the PvPers, so the PvE player cannot play in the sandbox, or has harder time building castles in the sand without someone kicking them every so often, miners as another example cannot be miners alone or have to contract hired bodyguards, because they will get ganged all to frequent and so on.

Essentially EVE is an unrestricted PvP game without rules that the best deceiver or exploiter wins, it doesn't have classes because first everyone must be a fighter and secondly goes with "incorporate all classes to the same character" path what class you are is the skills you currently train and the ship you are currently in, you just change class without login out if you change ship.

I don't know if this is really a sandbox, I feel it isn't.
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Posted: Aug 9th 2010 11:25AM Joshua Przygocki said

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Articles like this make me want to pick up EVE again... I could never get into it and perhaps I never will, but I really wish I could...

Does EVE University constantly accept new people? Maybe if I got with some people to "teach me to EVE" I could get into it more?

Posted: Aug 9th 2010 3:30PM Aetrix said

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The 2nd or 3rd time I tried to get into EVE, I did the E-UNI thing and I now believe it is easily one of the most worthwhile endeavors for new players to take part in, especially those who feel lost or unsure of what to do and where to go next. Not only do you get a crash course in the basic mechanics of the game, but you get a good look at what EVE is all about and what your options are. I was so impressed with and grateful for the service they provide that If I ever get tired of living in 0.0, I'm going back to the Uni to teach.

To answer your question, their doors are usually always open.
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Posted: Aug 9th 2010 3:48PM Joshua Przygocki said

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Well damn! I'm gonna go resub now then, I've been looking for a new mmo to play and eve sounds like fun, been on a scifi high anyway with star craft 2
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Posted: Aug 9th 2010 11:54AM Goldenspiral said

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I've never played EVE, but i've always been interested. There doesn't seem to be many other options for a sci-fi type of MMO experience. I'd love to pick it up, but its rather intimidating reading about things like a 6 month training course or something like that. Assuming I'd play about 10-15 hrs per week (spread over 4-5 days) would it really take me months to learn the game?

I'm not sure what i'd like to do in EVE, but I'd like to be able to contribute and have some fun in the first couple months.

My question is if I do start playing EVE, will it take me months before I can join a (dis)reputable group and start being productive? Are most folks still "noobish" after say 6 months?

Posted: Aug 9th 2010 12:51PM Brendan Drain said

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EVE is unlike a lot of other MMOs in that a person's ability in the game is mostly defined by their actual ability to learn and figure things out. If they knew what they were doing, a new player could almost immediately begin infiltrating corps or join up with any pirate corp that has a training scheme. If you're a fast learner, you'll do well in EVE.
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Posted: Aug 9th 2010 3:39PM Aetrix said

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As long as you pick a path early on and stay focused, 6 months is more than enough time to become proficient in that area. If you go the jack-of-all trades route, your skill points will still be spread awfully thin by that point.

That said, you can be useful to a group of veteran players within your first week of playing. Try saying that about any other MMO.
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Posted: Aug 9th 2010 5:46PM Anulla said

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I just started playing about a month ago, and even though I'm still the noob, I'm in a corp, successfully skilling up in mining, and doing PvE missions on the side. The goal is to be an uber-miner in about 2 months, then work on my pvp skills, as our corp moves into 0.0 space. The New Player Experience makes it much easier to get into the game, as there are plenty of tutorial missions to teach you how to get around and do things in Eve, plus giving you money and ships as rewards to help you on your way.

The first month you have access to the Rookie Chat Channel and there's been no shortage of help there. The players have been nothing but helpful, so far, my experience has been all positive.

I was leery of the learning curve as well, but now, I have to say I wish I hadn't waited so long to try it out. Best advice I can give is, try it out.
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