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Reader Comments (88)

Posted: Jul 8th 2010 9:45PM (Unverified) said

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Not really. Spammers and scammers can make names, too.
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Posted: Jul 8th 2010 10:35PM Vandal said

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ActiBlizz is lying through their teeth when they say this is for the benefit of the community. It's about $$$$s. They're recent deal with Facebook shows that they're just trying to tap into those millions now that WoW's subscriptions have peaked.

ActiBlizz doesn't give a rat's behind about whether this compromises their community, they just see all that juicy social network ad profits and think they've figured out a way to get at it.

Only this time, maybe the brilliant Blizzard has finally gone too far.

Posted: Jul 9th 2010 1:34AM MacDexter said

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After reading most of the replies I would like to add one aspect to this story that seems to be missing from my point of view.

So all this information about this Blizzard-CM-guy could be found on the net once his real name was revealed? That means, everybody already knowing his name for one or other reason was already able to know this? The only thing that really happened is making his real name known to a bigger audience and then everything else was already prepared? I'm sorry, epic fail.

If you put all your sensitive data on the front door of your house and on every wall on the central public place of your town, eventually someone is gonna read it. Don't be surprised. There is a price for giving up your privacy for the sake of using "social community" hubs and the likes. I am quite glad all this happens in this way, for to me it is extremely irritating how naive a huge number of people are.

Mind you, I'm not saying Blizzard is right here. They're not and I hope, this will become a major failure for them. But I am afraid it will not be so. So many people have already given up their privacy (simply because they fail to realise how important it might be one day to have kept it up), they will even follow Blizzard here.

Be careful with your personal information on the net. Think twice before publishing something and then think again. There is no delete button on the net, it will stay there forever. It's like a pillow. Once it is ripped open, you cannot collect all feathers again and put them back in.

Blizzard's move is only one part of the story.

Posted: Jul 9th 2010 2:08AM (Unverified) said

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Agree 100% for everything here. It's a great suggestion, and one very similar to one I was just posting about in a journal I keep online. I don't think anyone would have any issues as long as they were provided with the option to use a single alias or a full opt out.

The thing is, 99% of WoW members have a master account type name. It was what we all used to log in with prior to battle.net coming in and changing our login to our emails. It's still listed on our accounts. I'd much rather use that or one that I can set myself.

Posted: Jul 9th 2010 5:28AM Jeromai said

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You -are- weird, Sera, but you are also right.

Which is so rare that I completely agree with everything you've written in an article that I should screenshot this for posterity. :)

Keen's one to talk, I took up his original blog challenge where he stuck his real name in the comments and sent him a little reply with his name, address, phone, birth date, age, LinkedIn account with college and degree he's taking, Steam profile, photobucket account. He shortly locked the comments thread after. Surely I can't be the only one who did that.

Sure, the privacy issue is systemic to more than just WoW - Google is a big leveler in how the ordinary person can do this, social networking sites upon which people have chosen to expose their real life info without thinking about the consequences of the internet at large being privy to it.

It doesn't mean that we should go ahead and encourage or support any further attempt at blending real lives and virtual identifies. Especially not by a company as big as Blizzard which will be affecting 11 million players by their crass decision-making. It sets an ugly precedent.

Posted: Jul 9th 2010 8:36AM Scuffles said

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Whats in a name..... well lets see, There have been a few video game based murders where some (already unstable, so don't blame the games) individual hunted someone down IRL from the virtual world with the intent to commit bodily harm.

Awesome blizzard you just saved them months of work.

Posted: Jul 9th 2010 12:03PM Royalkin said

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Blizzard has just driven the last nail into their coffin as far as I'm concerned. The only game they produce that I'm interested in is Diablo III, but now I'm seriously reconsidering that. First it was warden spying on us while we play their games, and now if I want to play anything I'll have to use my first name. Perhaps I'll just find a cracked version of D3 without all the privacy violating bits?

Sorry Activision-Blizzard (and Your Supreme Asshat Bobby Kotick), your not going to get anymore of my cash.

Posted: Jul 9th 2010 3:54PM Djinn said

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I'm sorry, but all the comments about being forced in some way to reveal your name are just hysterics. Pick one:

1. Your morals

2. A game

Not a difficult choice. If it really is so against your morals to reveal your name, don't. But don't pretend that anyone will ever "force" you to reveal your name - its a game! If anyone ends up revealing their name in WoW's forums and complain about it, they are either proving that a game is more important than their morals or they actually don't have that big an issue revealing their name to begin with and just want something to complain about.

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