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Reader Comments (17)

Posted: May 19th 2010 12:53PM karnisov said

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comment for around 32:40: genre isn't defined just by setting, its also defined by game mechanics. so i think that genre in terms of mechanics is still relevant to player tastes. i certainly like turn based strategy better than real time for example, and i prefer a sandbox mmo over a themepark one.

I do hope RG does a good story driven sandbox mmo, his story telling skills in games are top notch.

Posted: May 19th 2010 1:05PM (Unverified) said

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I can't stop looking at those rat-tails!!

8-S

Posted: May 19th 2010 6:01PM Tom in VA said

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OK, can anyone tell me if RG said anything worthwhile about the "resurrection of Tabula Rasa" (you Massively folks are such teasers!).

As to anything else he might have to say, I'm just not interested....

Posted: May 19th 2010 7:12PM Azzura said

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iTunes FAIL - Still TV Squad

Posted: May 19th 2010 7:54PM Firebreak said

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I was amazed that he was as open as he was. Good interview.

Posted: May 20th 2010 6:42AM (Unverified) said

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Shame they aren't creating a modern version of UO. 2D, some better graphics, all the same features, skills etc (The way things were before Trammel of course). They don't realize how many of us would buy the game instantly.

I don't know how many times I've read "UO was the best game ever! ..before trammel.." on the internet.

There are games like Darkfall and Mortal online which are pretty close to it but they're not nearly as much fun as UO was.

Posted: May 23rd 2010 6:14PM MewmewGrrl said

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All Trammel did was take people who didn't want to be involved in PvP and give them their own protected world. There's a reason why 90% of the players played there, because most didn't want forced PvP upon them, especially in the harsh environment of "lose absolutely everything you are wearing and carrying" UO. No more ganking, the game should have had a PvP flag since the beginning. The PvPers actually had to fight other PVP people who knew what they were doing and were there to fight and could fight bank, instead of ganking some poor miner or new player just venturing out into the world. If most people wanted PvP, they would have stayed in the PvP half of the world, so no mater what you want to pretend most people were happy with Trammel. A few whining gankers weren't.

If UO were to re-appear, it would not have the old PK system, nobody would put up with that in this day and age. They only did back then because of how little choice they had in games.

Trammel was also in response to a rapidly diminishing player base that were leaving to games such as EverQuest and Asheron's Call. They weren't going to put up with UO's BS PvP system anymore now that there were other games to go to. You can still find old quotes from the staff of UO back before EverQuest and AC came out, how arrogant they were when people gave suggestions on what might make things better. The game lost the players because of other games coming out, not because of Trammel.
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Posted: May 20th 2010 1:24PM BubleFett said

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Well, we heard it direct from the horse's mouth. No TR.
But in regards to Fantasy vs. SciFi the numbers clearly show
that players prefer Fantasy. Maybe, his head is still in space or
something. Nice interview though.

Posted: May 20th 2010 6:12PM swarmofcats said

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You totally missed the point he made. It's not a matter of people preferring fantasy over sci-fi. People prefer good games, they don't care if they are killing aliens or elves as long as it's a fun and engaging experience. If you make a good enough game it will be successful no matter what setting you use.
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Posted: May 20th 2010 6:04PM swarmofcats said

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An awesome interview and great listen. This episode is really one of the best gaming podcasts I've listened to in a long while, so good work and congrats on your 100th, Massively.

He's so spot on about the UO vs EQ model of MMOs and how there are just too many EQ model games and a huge opening for a good UO style game. There have been only a handful of triple-A sandbox MMOs since UO, while there are so many grindy themeparks released every year it's hard to find time--or reason to bother--trying each one.

Really looking forward to hearing more about his next game. Although I'm not gonna hold my breath for the next big thing anymore, I really liked what he had to say here and I think if anyone can create a good "living world" game it would be RG.

Posted: May 20th 2010 10:31PM thranx said

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Really enjoyed the podcast/interview.

While I agree with many of his views regarding the past and present, I disagree entirely with his view on free/freemium games. I'd rather buy (from his example) ultima online from a store (brick or steam) and pay monthly for a full complete game than participate in a game that is slim by default and made more robust in small 2-5 dollar increments.

I prefer the traditional full, rich game model as opposed to what I consider incomplete experiences.

Posted: May 20th 2010 11:21PM whateveryousay said

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Best Podcast Ever.

Posted: May 23rd 2010 5:49PM JediPagan said

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I don't care how many times Garriot has stumbled, the guy is my favorite game designer of all time. Origin will always be my favorite design house.

Posted: May 23rd 2010 8:51PM (Unverified) said

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I agree with you. While Origin may not be around anymore.. Garriot atleast seems to understand the market and the different directions it could go. He's always been one of the more simulation side of things developers instead of the here's a linear path now you follow it types.

It's interesting to hear, and makes sense after looking back at them, that even back in the Ultima series days they where simulating multiplayer style play within a single player game.

I kinda wish the more defined systems of Ultima Online would have made there way back into the game. The whole prey / pred. system was always an amazing idea and I was kinda sad to hear it was pulled at the last min. But it makes sense to remove something that can't handle the load put upon it at the time.

Some times I wish EA would just sell him back the Ultima franchise so that he could continue on with it. It seems its truly where his heart is and it just seems such a shame to see EA toss the franchise / series to the side and let it die. There was always so many places the series could explore and go in the future.

Seems to be the business standard these days for large companies to pickup a great franchise run it into the ground and then toss it to the side and let it die.
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Posted: May 24th 2010 8:37AM Loki1 said

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i've always thought that the Ultima rpg's were actually a MMO that couldn't be a MMO.

The whole "free roaming" genre is the prototype of MMO's, it's a single player RPG who dreams of being online.

And for this fact, a single player free-roaming Rpg is obsolete

Posted: May 24th 2010 8:58AM Loki1 said

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See Tabula Rasa would have had sandbox(simulation) elements. But for some reason only the more boring, WoW-like systems were actually provided to people.

I hope too, he will make a new Sci-Fi Online Total Simulation.

And this time with no elements from WoW.

Posted: May 24th 2010 12:43PM Brendan Drain said

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As eccentric as he is sometimes said to be, I have to admit that Garriott absolutely understands game design and the games industry. In this podcast, he gave a few really crystalising insights and showed he has a firm grasp of the MMO market. It thoroughly impressed me.

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