| Mail |
You might also like: WoW Insider, Joystiq, and more

Reader Comments (27)

Posted: May 6th 2010 10:06AM (Unverified) said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
This is...unexpected. I wonder if they just did something amazing, or shot themselves in the foot. I honestly can't see how this will play out.

Posted: May 6th 2010 10:16AM breezer said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
So... what does being open source do for an MMO? I don't get it.

Posted: May 6th 2010 11:05AM (Unverified) said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
It will contribute to the game's development, and already it is generating publicity that Ryzom has lacked for a long time.
Reply

Posted: May 6th 2010 10:16AM Barinthos said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
That's pretty amazing. I never would have thought a game would release their source code, let alone an MMO.

I'm pretty curious to see what comes out of this news/release as well.

Posted: May 8th 2010 8:34AM AnthonyHJ said

  • 2.5 hearts
  • Report
Well, iD Software have been putting out their source code for years, but they never went this far. Ryzom is a current (i.e. still active) MMO which is (probably) still making money and they released all of the art assets too under CC-BY-SA from what I have heard.

While others are fighting private servers, what Ryzom just did was invite them with one hand and limit them (in a good way) with the other.
Reply

Posted: May 6th 2010 10:20AM Cendres said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
Wonderful! I'm thinking this means player driven content can actually be put in game and stay there now. I hope this attracts a lot of people, or bring back others.

This may be very exciting for the future of Atys.

Posted: May 6th 2010 10:26AM (Unverified) said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
This is a question for anyone hosting a "private server" of a MMOG -- including future Ryzom operators: How do you cover operating costs? Hosting a 64-player NWN server out of my home is one thing but supporting 100s of concurrent players requires some serious hardware -- and expenses.

Posted: May 6th 2010 10:36AM Rollins said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
Few private servers ever get to the point where supporting hundreds of concurrent players matters; most that do survive off donations/home page advertising, as far as I know.
Reply

Posted: May 6th 2010 10:37AM wufiavelli said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
There are many private servers that fund themselves in different ways. DAOC, SWG EMU, and UO servers normally set up donations stores where they sell in game items. Players also donate lots of money to support their servers. I have known people to drop a few hundred dollars for free servers they play on.

Donations stores though are very different then f2p stores. They are far less intrusive on the game play. Also i tend to find private servers better balanced run then corporate servers.
Reply

Posted: May 6th 2010 10:44AM Beau Hindman said

  • 2.5 hearts
  • Report
If you have been playing lately, you might understand how cool this might turn out. Players have already helped to put in in-game forums, recipe books...the possibilities could be endless.

COULD. :)

Remember, they will still host the official servers and will verify that any player made items are safe. This is actually very smart, having your fans to help you create content/tools.

Beau

Posted: May 6th 2010 10:56AM (Unverified) said

  • 2.5 hearts
  • Report
"That's right, you can now create your very own Atys with Ryzom's blessing and completely free of charge." - massively.com

Not really.

"The level and world data associated with Ryzom will not be released as free content and their use will remain exclusive to players of the Ryzom game." - blog.ryzom.com

And from the FSF press release:

"If you want to run your own server for the game, you have the software to do that, but you won't really have any world data—information about geography, special places, characters, quests, items, and so on—to run it with. Winch Gate Properties, the company that currently holds the copyright for all game materials and runs the official server, has decided not to release that data, to avoid causing disruption for their current player community. People who want to run their own server will need to develop their own world to do so—only a small test world comes with the code."

Posted: May 6th 2010 11:41AM Lateris said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
So I can use the code but will have to make my own terrain maps and art work? If that's the case then I could recode it and make it DX 10? Then host my own server based on networking software that I would have to develop? It sounds almost like the UT III UDK tools that I use except I cant have more than 64 players. And I can't change the engine. I can make maps that are 12 miles by 12 miles. Hmmm- me thinks a sci fi project would be fun.
Reply

Posted: May 6th 2010 11:03AM Azimn said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
I woke up this morning and saw this on the Ryzom forum and freaked out. I just hope I can find some people willing to start a project based on this. I do hope that some tutorials and more info are soon to follow.

Posted: May 6th 2010 11:03AM aurickle said

  • 3 hearts
  • Report
Having just read the FAQ I can clear up some of the speculation that's going on.

This is NOT the Ryzom game that is going open source. The maps, quests, etc. are not included. That is all part of the Ryzom GAME as opposed to the Ryzom PROJECT.

What is open source is the engine itself -- both on the client side and the server side -- as well as the art assets such as models, animations, particle systems, etc. (Not the music, though, as they're still unclear as to its copyright status.)

There are two benefits to come from this move:

1) Independent programmers and developers can now get into the Ryzom engine to fix flaws and even develop new systems. Those changes MAY be incorporated back into the Ryzom game to improve the game itself. For example, an intrepid group of people could develop DX11 support for the game, rewrite the code for multi-core optimization, or even create whole new mission mechanics. The people behind the Ryzom game could then port those changes into the live game. This will NOT include actually writing missions or designing actual content for the game. But it's still a big plus for the game due to the fact that the development team can now pretty much focus just on content while the independent community creates systems and fixes bugs.

2) Independent developers can use the engine to create their own original games -- MMO or otherwise. This is a free engine that has now been extensively tested in the field for several years. That drastically reduces the cost of creating a game since you don't need to write your own engine from scratch or pay to license an existing one. The only catch here is that any changes you make to the engine in order to accommodate features that you are designing for your game -- whether it be DX11 support or a whole new skill progression mechanic -- must be shared with the community. However, any content that you create for use within the modified engine is entirely yours. (Level design, quests, class skills, lore, etc.) In other words, the engine must remain open but what you create and run using that engine is entirely yours.

Posted: May 6th 2010 4:10PM Purkit said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
That is some amazing news. I love the idea and I really hope it pays off for them. Back in the day I was really excited by Ryzom, unfortunately it didn't really live up to expectations. I cant see myself giving it another go unless there are some major changes to the engine, which may now happen.

Can we have Jump and 3D swimming please?

Posted: May 6th 2010 9:27PM (Unverified) said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
If jumping is ever added I am hoping very, very hard that it will consume at least 33% of your stamina each time.
Reply

Posted: May 6th 2010 11:54AM Seffrid said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
I agree with aurickle, it's the game engine that is being made available not the game itself. As far as Ryzom is concerned, the following quote from the article just about covers it:-

"so Ryzom fans can rest assured that their game isn't going anywhere."

Posted: May 6th 2010 1:00PM Magnux said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
I like it, never actually played the game, but would be interested in working with some one. For my part I do some writing on the side and could contribute to lore and quest and all that good stuff.

Posted: May 6th 2010 1:15PM (Unverified) said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
I'm a bit confused ... the Nevrax's NeL framework (3d engine, sound engine, network engine), was already licensed under the GPL, wasn't it?

This was the old website: http://www.opennel.org/
The new one is: http://dev.ryzom.com/

Now, though, the Free Software Foundation hosts a nice repository of the artistic assets: http://media.ryzom.com/



Posted: May 6th 2010 1:24PM (Unverified) said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
Also, OpenNeL has always been in great need of support ... recently they've tried (in vain) to join the Google Summer of Code 2010.

I don't think that this move will have a big impact on the game but the engine is great. It is solid, well-tested and can be easily ported to other platforms. I hope it will find its way in the open-source and indie MMO scenes ...

Featured Stories

Make My MMO: October 19 - 25, 2014

Posted on Oct 25th 2014 8:00PM

Perfect Ten: My World of Warcraft launch memories

Posted on Oct 25th 2014 12:00PM

Engadget

Engadget

Joystiq

Joystiq

WoW Insider

WoW

TUAW

TUAW