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Reader Comments (27)

Posted: Apr 8th 2010 8:07AM (Unverified) said

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i hate pugs, mainly just play with people i meet while raiding in wow, you get sick of idoits wasting your time in pugs after awhile:P

Posted: Apr 8th 2010 8:11AM (Unverified) said

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If the game is designed well, PUGs are fun and productive. Reference WoW's semi-recent dungeon pairing system.

If the game sucks, then PUG'n sucks.

Posted: Apr 8th 2010 8:14AM Georgio said

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I do not hate PUGs. I had some of my nicest MMO experiences with PUGs (maybe bad PUGs memories are like trauma memories and the brain deletes them). Best ever BRD run (ohh the old WOW days ) it was with a random bunch of fun ppl who all ended up on my friends list. Even now after 4 years (oh lord ) I remember that 3 or 4 hours BRD fun ride, full of laughter , bad pulls , pranks etc.

Posted: Apr 8th 2010 8:18AM Snichy said

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One of the reasons I enjoy MMOs over single player games is the sense that there are hundreds of other people in the world doing the same as me, just like in real life (which is why I hate instancing in games!). However Im not one to talk much in any kind of "World Chat" or guild chat, and rarely join PUGs unless its in my own best interests.

I generally solo through games but love the fact that at any time I can liaise with someone else and get/give help.

Posted: Apr 8th 2010 8:42AM Tanek said

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"One of the reasons I enjoy MMOs over single player games is the sense that there are hundreds of other people in the world doing the same as me, just like in real life (which is why I hate instancing in games!)."

Real life has its own version of instancing, though, and for that I'm very glad. Can you imagine if everyone in the world was in the same supermarket trying to get the same carton of milk you are after? :)

As for PUGs...I tend to stick with a set of friends over random grouping, but I have had lots of fun in PUGs, too, with some of the strangers being added to the aforementioned set of friends. I'm sure I've had plenty of bad experiences as well; they just haven't been enough to label all PUGs as -fun.
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Posted: Apr 8th 2010 2:30PM (Unverified) said

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"Can you imagine if everyone in the world was in the same supermarket trying to get the same carton of milk you are after? :)"

This isn't instancing - this just means there is more content in real life to spread the player base out. If there were instancing in real life it would mean you could attempt to meet someone in the milk isle at that store and both be there but be unable to see each other.
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Posted: Apr 8th 2010 8:24AM Temko said

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what i enjoy most?

Competative gameplay on all levels with a tight knit group of fellow friends in the same mindset.

Power gamers with a passion to be the best of the best by any legal means possible wile still playing without the 12yr old crying and cussing fest that is the known staple to our kind of players.

people who set their minds to something: And get it done.

also a reason i dont join pugs unless i'm the one leading them, or someone i know is competent is.

Posted: Apr 8th 2010 9:58AM breezer said

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I love PUGs. There's something really beautiful about 4-5 perfect strangers getting together and accomplishing a common goal. Whether that be efficient XP or phat lewtz, I dig it.

I find dealing with endgame guilds to be the worst. Drama, brown-nosing, favoritism, a work ethic instead of a fun ethic. It's all stuff I play MMOs to avoid...

Posted: Apr 8th 2010 7:00PM (Unverified) said

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I agree wholeheartedly.
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Posted: Apr 8th 2010 9:15AM Arkanaloth said

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Due to the horrific nature of PUGs in FFXI I almost quit MMO's entirely and I DID quit playing healers for 8 months, WoW did nothing to alleviate the PUG horror... I love the worlds though, darn their interesting nature!! *shakes fist* and I'm one of those oddballs that actually *likes* playing healers, so after one PUG too many I went BST/WHM and enjoyed the rest of my time in FFXI. After that I came up with self preservation rules:

If I'm playing a healer all PUG invites are flatly declined, and more often than not I'm running a healer. If I'm playing anything else and have nothing else I want to do then I *might* consider a PUG though watching floor boards warp would be less painful so my odds of accepting sit somewhere between 0 - 3%. If I don't have an immediate circle of friends.. give me NPC's.

Posted: Apr 10th 2010 12:13AM (Unverified) said

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PUGs in FFXI were quite bad for most classes when I played. If you didn't know who you were inviting, it could be quite a gamble even venturing out to xp. Other games have been better in some areas (looser requirements on who you can party with) and worse in others (horrible player search tools). Probably the best PUG experiences I've had were in GW. I haven't player another game that had a mechanic to ask to be invited to an existing party.
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Posted: Apr 8th 2010 9:25AM Sorithal said

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PUGs are horrible for the most part.

Good ones are rare, but they're fun when you manage to find them.

I usually prefer soloing while leveling, but eventually if I find a good guild or run into people who I find fun to chat with, I'll go with the "circle of friends".

Posted: Apr 8th 2010 9:33AM Jhaer said

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For me, the quality of PUGs is directly proportional to how much players need each other. Back before WoW in EQ1, people needed other people to level, and they shared content, as such people, in general, tried to not be asshats because being an asshat meant you either got no groups or you had to group with other asshats (and usually guild with them too... all the asshats tended to be in one or two guilds which made spotting and avoiding them easier, but hell to deal with when you couldn't because, well, they were all asshats). In WoW, no players needs another player. You can level up and gear up (through drops and the auction house) entirely without other people, so there is no incentive to not bean asshat in groups.

If you want better PUGs, you need games that almost require other people to play. If you want to be able to play solo most of the time, PUGs are going to suck.

Posted: Apr 8th 2010 9:42AM (Unverified) said

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pugs are not as terrible as people make them out to be.

Posted: Apr 8th 2010 12:21PM Rich said

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I tended to notice that in WoW the people who PuG'd alot were much better players than the people who played with the same 5-10 people all the time.

I never really played any other game long enough to really get a feel for the quality of PuG's.
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Posted: Apr 8th 2010 6:52PM (Unverified) said

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Nice observation, sadly i wouldn't know because none of my real life friends plays mmos and i never connected with a guild long enough to make friends to play with regularly. although i raided with them occasionally but raiding is another subject i guess.
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Posted: Apr 8th 2010 10:39AM Seffrid said

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I love the multiplayer aspect of MMORPG's and find offline single-player games very empty and boring no matter how strong the storyline. However, I have no interest these days in grouping or guilding in MMO's and prefer to solo for adventuring with my interraction with other players taking place through the chat channels, forums, occasional shared quests, crafting and trading etc.

It has long seemed to me that the crux of the difference between those who prefer grouping and those who prefer soloing is the question of the extent to which players look to computer games for their social life. A lot of players either play with their RL friends or make new cyber friends through their gaming, whereas others find that their RL friends aren't into gaming and they feel no need to develop new friendships in a computer game as they're gaming during their breaks from other social activities with their friends and families.

A lot of groupers claim that soloers are anti-social, but I wouldn't be at all surprised if it were more the other way round. A lot of soloers have active social lives away from the computer whereas a lot of groupers are relying on the computer for their social life, or so it seems to me.

Posted: Apr 8th 2010 11:06AM Arkanaloth said

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you present an interesting point.. I honestly have never felt a need for video-game level socializing with the public at large.. I have a LOT of friends IRL, see quite a few of them every week. Going out to dinner with people, watching movies, basically sitting about chatting..etc. Socially.. my life is pretty darn complete so the draw for me with MMO's isn't as much the community as it is the world and the stories in it.
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Posted: Apr 8th 2010 2:39PM Tom in VA said

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Well said, Seffrid. I usually play MMOs pretty much all the way solo, though I will group up occasionally and for brief quests.

What I no longer do -- EVER -- is group up with other players for instances. MMOs need to develop "instance options" allowing players the option to play through them with NPCs or solo, as well as in groups of other players.

The worst part about most MMO group instances is that (1) they take too long to complete, (2) finding a group when you're ready to run an instance can be a real pain, and (3) the possibility/probability of finding a bad group is unacceptably high.

At least with NPCs (think Guild Wars), you know what to expect and finding a group is never a problem. I suspect that Guild Wars 2 and SWTOR are going to be MMOs that are very VERY solo-friendly, and this is a good development, imo.
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Posted: Apr 8th 2010 6:58PM (Unverified) said

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Indeed a nice point Seffrid and concerning me, it is a valid point. I occasionally group for instances but i have no mmo gaming friends, real or cyber so i solo my way to the cap. All my friends prefer single player games and think mmos are all about grind, raids and thus shallow.
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