| Mail |
You might also like: WoW Insider, Joystiq, and more

Reader Comments (17)

Posted: Mar 4th 2010 8:09AM (Unverified) said

  • 1 heart
  • Report
First! Even though probably not after I'm done typing this.
I love my characters and put a little part of myself into each. I spend a good long time at the character creation screen but I'm never ever satisfied. The one pet peeve of mine is not being able to have a good name. I like to have a unique name that sets my character apart without being too cheesy. It is best when games have options to edit the looks of your character after it's creation.

Posted: Mar 4th 2010 8:12AM (Unverified) said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
Eek! The thought of wildly clicking or hitting 'randomise' in a character creator gives me the shivers! =)
My avatar is my online representation of myself (or the character I wish to portray at least) so I always deliberately pick my appearance.

I don't think I necessarily get attached to them as if they're an entity per se, but more as a avatarial (yes I made that word up) representation of a whole lot of hard work and experiences.

Posted: Mar 4th 2010 8:22AM Aganazer said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
I've been playing games for so long now that I have probably created thousands of character. I find it difficult to get attached to them anymore. I still try to personalize them, make them interesting, and always with a unique theme of some sort, but when it comes time to say goodbye its not like I miss them or anything.

Posted: Mar 4th 2010 8:42AM Ripper McGee said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
I used to be much more attached, but I've turned into a casual player in the last several years due to life. I play a lot, but don't have time commit to grinding up a main, in most cases.

Instead, I'm kind of an altoholic. I've had to travel a lot for work, so I've been known to create an alt during a travel week (especially in games like CoX), level it up from my hotel room (because in the early levels it's tends to be easy to find PUGs and you feel like you actually accomplish something in a short amount of time) and then delete the character when I'm done with the week.

~Ripper

Posted: Mar 4th 2010 8:48AM (Unverified) said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
Haven't we talked about this before?

Anyway, what games like City of Heroes and, as much as I hate Cryptic, Champions Online offer players is the ability to fashion simulacra that reflects something within the player. With higher amounts of customization, these reflections of our inner emotive lives could be as simple as emulating Neo or as complicated as embodying the reverential ideal of Bravery that a person has. I find it hard to get attached to characters in games where your Orc Warrior is basically every other Orc Warrior in the game, but anything could set of that spark, be it the name, the costume, backstory. The more tools we have to explore the characters we create, and the more we bother to use those tools, the more attached people become to their creations.

Basically, people who aren't attached to their characters don't invest time in their creation. People who are, do.

Posted: Mar 4th 2010 9:13AM Ripper McGee said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
I generally agree with the bulk of your post, but disagree with your summary. That may be true for many players, but I personally spend a lot of time creating and fleshing out my characters (especially in games like CoX, but also in more casual games), even if I know I'll probably throw them away. Heck, I downloaded the Korean Hero Creator just because creating a hero was so involved and fun for me!

Then again, I may be an exception.

~Ripper
Reply

Posted: Mar 4th 2010 10:54AM Thac0 said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
Thats not true I'm an alcoholic because i love creating characters, but i don't love my MMO characters because there is no reason to love them, MMO story lines are impersonal and watered down and the RPG elements of MMOS are so template driven that the only difference between your character and a thousand others is your outward appearance and lets face it with armor etc. most characters end up looking like clones then too. All of this leaves me rather emotionally void after taking my characters out into the game. I'd say I like my characters a lot more before I taken them into the game world and their uniqueness is taken away. Although i take hours with the character creators.
Reply

Posted: Mar 4th 2010 10:56AM (Unverified) said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
Okay, maybe my summary is a logical disjoint from my argument. I suppose what I mean is that the more of ourselves we invest into our characters, the more we care about them.

For example, perhaps your (a figurative you, not actually you) main was a fire controller because fire was an awesome powerset. You fleshed out your fire controller for hours, using a thesaurus to find a name that matched with fire, flame or whatever. I have done this, and that character, Sulfurio, means absolutely nothing to me.

Another character I made, I started with a name and infused my nonchalance into his concept with a lackadaisical attitude toward super heroism. A Storm Summoner defender, his costume is a T-Shirt with a wave on it and some jeans. His name is Tommy Tsunami and I'll be damned if i don't resub every few months just to hang out at Atlas Park.

So, yeah, I think you're right. It's not the time we spend as much as the personal investment.
Reply

Posted: Mar 4th 2010 9:18AM Thac0 said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
Not any MMO characters, however I just loaded up my old pal Shepard on Mass Effect to and it was like seeing an old friend, i was so happy.

No MMO has been able to build a relationship with a character the way a single player game can and thus all MMO characters are to me are paper dolls in the end.

Posted: Mar 4th 2010 10:41AM (Unverified) said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
I tend to grow attached to my characters because I do invest some of my time and life philosophy into them. Maybe because of that, even if I try out some different characters and playstyles I tend to end with just one character that I play regularly.

Somehow it's like having a friend you know well somewhere around in virtual worlds (I also sometimes miss my Second Life character...) and it's always with some pleasure that after some days away from my character I return to it. There's a kind of longing for that other me and sometimes it's a peaceful feeling when I get to see "me" on the screen.

Posted: Mar 4th 2010 10:58AM Deadalon said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
Before I got very much attached to my character. Mainly because I played every game with just one character and saw the world through that character. I found that to be a true RPG form of playing. And it also means you get more of the higher end content than if you play alot of characters to lower lvls with the time you have to play. But ofc - this also means that there is a chance of me not liking what is happening to my character ingame - like for example my Paladin in WOW. When Sunwell hit and the high emphasis of AOE healing became aparent - I simply quit the game cause it was obvious that the developers intented to deleberatly hurt one healing spec in the game. Thats not acceptable in my book. Balancing is not about dragging one class spec into the gutter. I will never forgive Blizzard for this and I repeatedly tried to point this out to them before the Sunwell patch hit live. It always got the same answer - "balance". Balance my arse.

Posted: Mar 4th 2010 2:33PM pcgneurotic said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
I've had two 'characters' in my entire gaming life: Philon, from the EQ1 and Planetside era, and Broadhead from since WoW and EQ2 onwards. Philon was a mash-up of Phil Collins, my favourite singer, and Broadhead came from Robinette Broadhead, the hero of Fred Pohl's sublime Gateway books.

Just a few days ago actually, I bought a new printer that came with some free photo paper samples, so I decided to start making a gallery of glossy 10x15s of some of my best, most favourite Broadheads...

http://img401.imageshack.us/img401/1347/sdc11055v.jpg

(Left to Right: LoTRO, DDO, WoW)

Posted: Mar 4th 2010 3:51PM (Unverified) said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
Of all the MMO-characters I've created, only two had any personal attachment.
First and foremost, my WoW-character, Burildur on Argent Dawn, whom I played almost exclusively in the time I've played WoW. WoW's quests hardly told a great story, but the background I made for him, along with the people he met and the things that happened made him feel almost real. He started a story and ended up with a sort-of happy ending just before WotLK came out. I played him after that, but the roleplaying element was mostly gone, since his story had played out.

Then my Guild Wars character, Bastian Shaw. While he had little to no background, his Luxon armour earned him the nickname Turtleman, and his surname, Shaw, started a tradition with me and a friend of calling all RP-type characters Shaw for a surname, to make a Guild Wars-family that I fully intend to continue in GW2.

Ah, good times.

Posted: Mar 4th 2010 4:10PM Bezza said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
If I have reached the point where I am creating a character for a MMO it usually means I am trailing the game or have subscribed for one reason or another, what ever has attracted me to investigate any given MMO title has most likely engendered some embryonic character concept that will be further inspired by the back-story and artistic style and genre of the game. Most of this happens on the subconscious level and I don’t really think about it so much till I arrive at the character creator and see what my options are. The more options the better, the less restricting and limiting the better, the more time I can take to customise the appearance of my new character the better. While doing this in the back of my mind I am thinking of the concept around my new character and the actual process of generating the new toon helps this process. The more a game lends itself to allowing me to develop my character idea the more attached I am likely to be to that character, the longer I am likely to play it, and subsequently the game.

So yes I am attached to my characters, particularly if the concept I have created works well in that game.

Posted: Mar 4th 2010 8:02PM (Unverified) said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
In love with my toons? No, but a lot of blood, sweat, and time went into each and every (ghod sooo many alts.)
Envious of their powers? You better believe it!

Posted: Mar 5th 2010 12:13AM Anatidae said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
I enjoy the role-play aspect of my characters - but I am only attached so far as the time spent into them to keep playing. Meaning, I'll play my level 80 Druid because he is level 80 and I don't feel like running the WoW treadmill again with an alt. But in this example, I left him behind unsubscribing only a few weeks after 80 and enough time to check out the sites of the WoW expansion.

Posted: Mar 5th 2010 2:04AM (Unverified) said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
Sadly WoW does not give quite the character customisation that one would like, but I'm still emotionally attached to my short, skinny undead. Having played the same character for just short of 5 years (yes I do cheat on him with a few other 80's) it's a nice feeling logging in to him and getting all those Hello's from my guildies and friends online. A character's not just about himself as a unit, but his connection to others.

Featured Stories

Make My MMO: December 21 - 27, 2014

Posted on Dec 27th 2014 8:00PM

One Shots: Grim Raider

Posted on Dec 27th 2014 2:00PM

Engadget

Engadget

Joystiq

Joystiq

WoW Insider

WoW

TUAW

TUAW