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Reader Comments (17)

Posted: Feb 23rd 2010 5:06PM (Unverified) said

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I like where the lore is going, though I'd much rather explore it in-game than read about it.

Posted: Feb 23rd 2010 6:09PM Sean D said

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I hear you. The games I enjoy the most are those that expose me as much as possible to the lore of the universe they are set in. At the same time, I really like having the option to do both, play the game and read a novel set in the same universe, if I want. That there are novels written based on the varied lore of some of my favorite games is something I appreciate. Often novels or comics or short online stories can illuminate parts of an otherwise broad or railroad-ish storyline, or give different perspectives on the same events that occur in-game.

For whatever reason (I'm not a game developer), the creators of games (I'm mostly talking about MMOs here) these days seem limited by current technology when it comes to giving the players a more robust experience (most games released today follow the same general patterns). Maybe their just disinclined to do more with the technology they have. In any case, novels, etc. aren't limited in the same ways and as such they provide us with an experience I don't think you'll be able to find in any game.
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Posted: Feb 23rd 2010 7:16PM cray said

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Kinda hard to do considering 250 years between the first Guilds Wars and the upcoming sequel. This book is only one of three novels set to be released. It will help explain what has happened in Tyria for the gap in time.
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Posted: Feb 24th 2010 9:27AM Tanek said

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This is one of the reasons I find myself going against (what seems to be) popular opinion about instancing in games. I actually prefer quests/missions/whathaveyou to be instanced so that my character can participate in the story to a greater degree than is possible in "standard" MMO play.

With GW, the quests were all about my party and what we could do. No waiting for a boss because someone else just got it; no other groups tagging mobs we needed; no dilution of our adventure because there were 20 other parties doing the exact same thing and looting the exact same unique quest item. It was more like playing a story than playing a game. (I loved the addition of books to record missions.)

Technology can catch up to doing this in other ways, I am sure. Phasing is one example of how an "open" world area can still be changed by the actions of your character, but there are still issues to be overcome. If GW2 can find ways to tell the story and have the players participate in it just as effectively using an open world, nothing would make me happier.

I seem to have drifted a bit from the actual topic of the post, so I'll drift back...
I am hoping that, similar to the Bonus Mission Pack from GW, there will be opportunities in GW2 to take part in events from history. Maybe even the events from this book. I can dream, anyway. :)
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Posted: Feb 23rd 2010 6:01PM (Unverified) said

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Very nice cover art, most game based novels have a cheesy cover.

Posted: Feb 23rd 2010 6:18PM (Unverified) said

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At last, we will learn more substantially about the world of GW2. At the same time, it hints that GW2 plans are progressing positively and that we stand a good chance to see the game before the end of next year. Lol at the reference about running... it seems they'll have to fight it out!

Posted: Feb 23rd 2010 7:07PM Thac0 said

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This is great. Books will aways give you a more intimate and detailed look into things. I always enjoy looking at things in game and know what it is from having read about it in a tale. It makes the world that much more alive.

Posted: Feb 23rd 2010 7:09PM Minofan said

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I shall await it eagerly. ^_^

I hope they're able to keep this visual theme going all the way up-to & including the actual game covers, as it's classy & distinctive (much like the in-game art direction).

Posted: Feb 23rd 2010 7:47PM (Unverified) said

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I might pick it up. Looks like a good read

Posted: Feb 23rd 2010 10:03PM TheJackman said

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Wow talk about milking it! I am still waiting to see the game play "live" after what they pull with there last game remember that "great" trailer I do not trust there trailers anymore!

Posted: Feb 23rd 2010 10:34PM (Unverified) said

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Don't be mad because your too stupid to read :) I'm sure the book is going to be good.
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Posted: Feb 23rd 2010 11:15PM TheJackman said

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Not too stupid to read, I spend money on real books not this marking crap other books like this Dragon Age, Mas Effect, And some of the World of Warcraft books like the one base on the lich king that was pretty much warcraft 3 and some weird new facts that never where use in the game!
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Posted: Feb 24th 2010 12:08AM (Unverified) said

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I generally liked what Forbeck had to say about how to write this sort of novel in the PAX clips. Hopefully it'll be a good read, I'll keep my fingers crossed tho, just to make sure :)

Posted: Feb 24th 2010 12:26AM Gloon said

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I like the idea of books based on the games we love, if the time and effort is actually put into them, using reputable writers with a track record of successful storytelling. It is a perfect way to complement a game world's lore and provide an avenue for fans to further immerse themselves in that world.

For me, I hate games that require me to read countless lines of text to tell me a story. That's what I have books for. I don't play games to read. A game should tell me the story through gameplay, not text. That's been my conundrum with past Bioware games. I love so much about them, but when I encounter a key character in the game's plot and am immediately bombarded with enough conversation to flesh out a novel, I find myself reaching for the Exit button.

Leave text to the books. This is a good move.

Posted: Feb 24th 2010 8:20AM (Unverified) said

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Could be an interesting read. Personally I'd love more trailers though, but I'm assuming they are going to be quite tight-lipped with that kind of info for quite some more time.

But I do really hope the author doesn't follow some sort of Twilight-scheme in order to maximize profits...

Posted: Feb 24th 2010 1:32PM cray said

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For those who are suggesting ArenaNet is milking their franchise. These books have been announced a long time ago to help explain what has happened in the last 250 years. Guild Wars is non-subscription game, so ArenaNet has had to be very creative in finding ways to make money.

If anything that they have done to warrant criticism, is the sudden emergence of the art book, which was expensive considering the shipping cost. Still despite that, Guild Wars is probably most affordable A-list MMO out there.

Posted: Feb 24th 2010 2:04PM (Unverified) said

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I don't think ArenaNet is milking their franchise either. Actually... I think they're not doing enough. I remember seeing a swarm of new players in World of Warcraft, shortly after the South Park episode.

I'm surprised MMORPG companies don't learn from the lessons of 80's cartoons... Transformers, Thundercats, GI Joe... I'm thinking that Guild Wars would be more successful if it had a cartoon.

Although, the lore is not exactly mainstream material. Humans are losers in Tyria. That's why I'm not interested in this book. If ArenaNet was milking their franchise, wouldn't this be a book about the Ascalonians slaughtering the Charr?

250 years of failure, false god worship and random dragon havoc... doesn't seem like the kind of stuff moms would like to see on a Saturday morning TV show.

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