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Reader Comments (28)

Posted: Feb 19th 2010 5:16PM Graill440 said

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Out of the entire list, two have decent credentials, and by that i mean consistant successes, and statements not clouded by "what i like".

The others have multiple failures, all of which i am sure were fine "learning" experiences for them and the folks that lost money.

When devs worry about what we want and not what they want or like from day one, and learn to say no to a suit because the resources for a particular project arent available, the industry might improve.

Posted: Feb 19th 2010 5:27PM jmerriex said

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Spoken like someone who has never worked in the industry. When you are dealing with a group as diverse as gamers you'll quickly learn that you cannot please everyone and often times the community themselves will clash on ideas. In those instances you need to be able to make a decision. The best developers I've worked with have been those that make that decision based on their own personal experiences and tastes.

So ultimately it is more important to know what they like than what the players like. I know at my own company I have not hired people because they liked one game or play style over for the sole reason that I know that when put in the situation I've described above they are more likely to make a successful choice than not.

Finally, not one of them mentioned working on a "failed" game. All of the titles that they list are games that are profitable and most are still operating profitably.
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Posted: Feb 19th 2010 6:29PM (Unverified) said

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I just want to know if Ms. Paiz feels any personal shame when she mentions THERE on her resume? The only thing worse than that for an MMO developer is to tout being part of The Sims Online.
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Posted: Feb 20th 2010 12:13AM (Unverified) said

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So are you under the massively misguided impression that the staff on a failed release are somehow not supposed to get further work? Or that every single aspect of a failed releae is responsible?

This industry doesn't base itself on selling faces. You think anybody but the star and director on a failed film has their careers ruined?

Great article, by the way, although the exact same series with a broader format would be just as good.
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Posted: Feb 19th 2010 5:56PM gildhur said

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I heard Kate Paiz is now Executive Producer of LotRO, replacing Steefel. You should ask her about that.

Posted: Feb 19th 2010 11:37PM Salaryn said

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Steffel.
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Posted: Feb 19th 2010 6:33PM (Unverified) said

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Not one from Blizz? Not one from CCP?

Posted: Feb 19th 2010 7:04PM (Unverified) said

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Graill & Moe Greene, demonstrating the bitter, bitchy, self important inadequacy of the forum poster throughout the internet!

Posted: Feb 19th 2010 7:53PM (Unverified) said

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To help keep this thread from just being a criticism of people's growth trajectories into influential roles (which is pretty standard for anyone in the game's industry - start on less prestigious projects, gain valuable experience and shift onto higher calibre projects), I'd like to commend the fact that Massively rounded up a dozen women with fairly diverse roles on their respective games.

I'm very much looking forward to their interviews, and hearing each person's unique take on the the industry, as well as the advice they have to give to current and future female developers. As founding member of a couple game companies, I've been avidly interested in the broadening diversity of game developers (not limited to gender), and their contribution towards the expansion of the industry into new audiences, experiences, and even the overall culture of a company.

This industry is going to evolve significantly over the coming years, and I'm excited to see the continued growth and great new games that these developers end up working on...

Posted: Feb 19th 2010 8:11PM (Unverified) said

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I am definitely looking forward to the future of this interview! You women are an inspiration for the rest of us, although I'm sure you know that already :).

Similarly to Mark, I am very interested in seeing diversity within the game industry expand, and perhaps, Graill, it is also this diversity that will become necessary in tapping into what an increasingly diverse market is looking for. With my graduation just over a year away, hearing about these women's perspectives on MMO development will greatly help me understand what sort of games I'd like to be creating in the future.

Thanks to Massively and the interview participants for setting this all up!

Posted: Feb 19th 2010 8:23PM Pitt said

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Carrie Gouskos and Emily Taylor are very good designers

I was really impressed with the warhammer journal, and impressed with dominos crafting changes to EQ2

Posted: Feb 19th 2010 9:19PM Salaryn said

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I'm looking forward to the series. This is a great list of people doing practical hands on jobs in the gaming industry, really creating and shaping what we play. A much finer list than that annual "influential women in gaming" list that is filled with women working in the Disney mailroom :P

Posted: Feb 20th 2010 12:00AM (Unverified) said

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I don't get it. Women say don't treat us different we're just like everyone else.

So i say ok, sure buy me dinner.
Y'all confuse me.

Posted: Feb 20th 2010 1:46AM (Unverified) said

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You cannot deny that finding a woman in the game industry is vastly more difficult than it is to find a man, and this series is recognizing women to inspire other women to enter the field to potentially change that. (You'd be surprised how many people do not enter a particular profession because of gender disparities and stereotypes. It's like the whole male nurse thing that is changing with time).

For the record, I'd buy you dinner =P
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Posted: Feb 20th 2010 12:25AM (Unverified) said

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Of those listed here, IMHO Jessica Downs has a rough, thankless job.

Posted: Feb 20th 2010 2:49AM (Unverified) said

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I didn't think it mattered any more what gender one is or any of that, but hey yeah go for it.

I know you'd buy dinner. ;)

Posted: Feb 20th 2010 1:15PM (Unverified) said

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When looking to engage a wide audience, people's perspectives are very important, and a person's background (including but not limited to gender) often plays an important role in the shaping of his/her perspective.

If there are millions of female MMO players playing an MMO I'm developing (which is certainly the case for most MMOs), then I'm going to want to see a significant number of female candidates in order to hire a well-rounded development team (with a good mix of genders, ages, personal interests etc). This used to not be the case, but is improving, and yet could still be better.

So regardless of who buys who dinner, I do see value in encouraging more women to consider a career in games/MMOs. :)


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Posted: Feb 20th 2010 12:38PM pcgneurotic said

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Rosie Rappaport is a goddess. Original EQ? There's your creds right there, pal. ;)

Posted: Feb 20th 2010 3:31PM (Unverified) said

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Alright, what happened to the other comments?

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