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Reader Comments (6)

Posted: Feb 5th 2010 11:35PM Araxes said

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Good responses in part 2. Regina Buenaubra really nailed it on the second question. I think that's what I was getting at in my reply to part 1. Interesting read!

Posted: Feb 6th 2010 2:02PM (Unverified) said

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Her responses were pretty good, but there's something about this article that I don't like... Making it as an MMO Blogger. This assumes that it's completely up to the individual blogger to succeed or fail. This article also puts a huge emphasis on the ethics of the individual. It doesn't really address the role of the company. Proper community management helps set the tone.

For example, Regina states that she thinks speculating is a problem. But as a blogger, in a community that has a 3-4 year drought of information, I can easily see why speculation occurs. When there's nothing new to discuss, the community naturally looks towards the future.

That was a decision of ArenaNet. They started out with an unbelievable level of disclosure. I was blogging about a game in Alpha... ALPHA! Today, I know nothing special about Guild Wars 2... zero. When I first learned of Guild Wars 2, it wasn't from ArenaNet. What happened? More importantly, why the drastic change in community management? It's not just up to the blogger to accept inside information. It's also up to the community managers to decide what to disclose. And realistically, what blogger wouldn't accept an invite to the Guild Wars 2 alpha/beta?

...and when I do speculate, I try to base my options on as many facts as possible. Like when I broke the Guild Wars: Utopia story, I didn't claim it was Chapter 4, only that the information I found fit the model of previous expansions. And... AND... if not for speculating, how could my blog even exist? When I first started the Guild Wars thing, it was on the belief that the game would have a bright future. I was right.

I think there could be a follow-up to this article... what about the bloggers?! What do they think? Simple fact is that the developers have a great role in the success or failure of blogs/fansites. What do bloggers think the community relation mangers could be doing better, to help promote the game?
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Posted: Feb 6th 2010 4:41PM (Unverified) said

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Thanks for the great feedback, from everything throughout the entire article. We actually have a reverse perspective article in the works, thanks to the many suggestions from comments, email and even direct Twitter messages. Look for that to come in the next month or so!
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Posted: Feb 6th 2010 11:15AM (Unverified) said

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This is the most interesting article I've ever read on massively. Thank you!

Posted: Feb 7th 2010 1:56AM (Unverified) said

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First off, great article, absolutely thrilling to read. It comes at a perfect time, as a new work opportunity is giving me more flexibility. Blogging about Guild Wars is one of the things I'm interested in pursuing. "If only I had the time" is suddenly "What the hell am I going to do with all this time?"

Now, on to photics' concern. I had the same general reaction to Regina's comment regarding speculation. My first thought was "You don't like speculation? Better steer clear of ... well ... the internet." Like you said, speculation is kind of the lifeblood of the game blogger.*

I had to read it again to understand more clearly the intent of the answer.

"But speculating about a company's intentions in a way that presumes 100% knowledge of the circumstances generally gets grumbles from us." - Regina

It seems like speculation presented as fact is what really grinds their gears, which is understandable. When a team developing a game finds out that misinformation that negatively affects the buzz of a game is circulating, they want to do something about it. However, embargoes designed to cultivate a more controllable buzz (ie. divulging certain bits of information on a timetable, building to the release date) force the team to grumble helplessly with their hands tied.**

It's a great piece overall. It gives some enlightening and encouraging information to an aspiring blogger like myself. I would also be quite interested in the companion piece photics suggested. How do you get started? What advice can you give? How do you cultivate a following? That kind of stuff.

*(Distant Release Date + Rabid Excitement - Actual Information = Speculation)

** Speculation, not fact.

Posted: Feb 12th 2010 12:43PM (Unverified) said

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What a great article. My thanks to all parties involved. As a new blogger, I found the material to be fascinating. I feel like I have absorbed months worth of insight.

I actually found it somewhat surprising that the overall view of blogging from the guests was positive. It's easy to feel disconnected from the larger entities and it was pleasantly refreshing to pick up a predominantly positive vibe.

Of course none of us want to read that a company is only interested in us if our reader base is "X" or larger, but hey that's reality. Game development is a business and there's only so much time and money to go around.


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