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Reader Comments (17)

Posted: Dec 20th 2009 8:10AM pcgneurotic said

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In the first case, to get a handle on combat mechanics, I make a melee character. I find that understanding the toe-to-toe stuff gives me a good idea of comparative strengths and weaknesses between mobs and player classes.

After that, I keep a beady eye on the general or help channels in chat, and for real specifics or if I get stuck, I go to the official forums.

The last line of learning comes when I know what I'm doing, but not sure why I'm doing it. In that case, the site-specific wikis or fan strategy databases on the web are my friend.

Posted: Dec 20th 2009 8:17AM mrdrum81 said

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I have to say, over the past 2 1/2 years of playing Lord of the Rings Online, my favorite resource to look at for quest help or locations of mobs was

http://mehq.net/dynmap/index.php?mapId=13&lang=

Sort of an interactive map! Works lovely!

Posted: Dec 20th 2009 5:09PM Machinator said

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That map is the BOMB. I don't play LotRO anymore because it's a flagrant WASTE of time, but it was useful when I did play.

Cheers mehq.net!
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Posted: Dec 20th 2009 8:30AM (Unverified) said

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I learn the game through playing and asking people.
I dont want to waste my time on reading walls of text, I'm here to have fun...

Posted: Dec 20th 2009 8:46AM Miffy said

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I just play the game and pick up on it as I go along. I mean it ain't hard these days they're all WoW clones so they play pretty much the same. You start in a stupidly easy levels 1 - 10 tutorial which isn't fun, offers no challenge and just gives you a bunch of fetch or kill quests. Then when you get out of that if you haven't quit from bored already you're given some sort of crafting and PVP but it all sucks until you get to end game. Crafting is useless unless you can craft the best stuff as all the people higher level than you can craft what you can for cheaper and PVP isn't balanced until you get to end game.

So you grind along from levels 10 - 20 and the zones are still well designed but you just wish you were at end level already because leveling is so boring. Levels 20 - 50 seem to be the levels that dragggggggggggggggg and the zones slowly get worse and worse with less and less quests. Theres also less and less people as they all quit from boredom before.

Once you hit level 60 or the end game then you have to run raids and grind PVP to get gear and you wonder why you wasted all your time because the game just isn't fun. Theres no point to anything and you can't ever lose anything or gain anything really.

That is why I really love EVE and why it works because there is no end game, you're constantly evolving but you can join your friends right away and not have to grind 60 levels to get to them. Also you can lose something but you can also gain lots and it makes things really exciting.

I never got people who hate death penalties because they keep you playing and keep things interesting and make everything more exciting.

Posted: Dec 20th 2009 8:54AM Scuffles said

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I have found more often than not asking something will get you yelled at, tho once and a while someone nice will answer your question.

also never underestimate the games Tutorial, if one is available is always helpful to get the basics of interacting with the game. If no tutorial going to the games options usually yields a menu that tells you what keys are assigned to do what.

Its easier to look things up most if not all games have forums and the search function answers a lot of things. Usually these days most MMO also sport a Wiki or three.

The reason being the game publishers themselves aren't bothered with letting you know how the game works because A) that would take time and effort on their part and B) if you knew what you were doing when you started you wouldn't be as apt to use the cash shop to buy a respec later on .... On the plus side some of the Player Wiki sites are beyond top notch.

Posted: Dec 20th 2009 9:29AM (Unverified) said

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I just play through the game and either learn stuff by doing or asking guildies/random people for help.

Posted: Dec 20th 2009 9:54AM Meagen said

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Wikis are nice when they exist and are up-to-date (kudos to the official GW wiki!). It's hard to find the answer to a particular question on forums - which section should I check? How many pages of topics do I have to browse through to find what I need? What do I type in the search box to get useful answers and not "omg this mechanic is sooo broken im quittin"?

When I last checked, Fallen Earth's wiki still had info in the future tense, apparently gleaned from previews and interviews from before launch. I wanted to find out where the next Barter vault access is north of Old Kingman, and all I found was "Barter vaults are the same as sector vaults, except that they are not available in all locations". (I just checked and apparently they added one line with the Barter vault locations, so yay I guess.)

For the longest time I thought the vaults marked "Barter" *were* the oft-mentionned VIP vaults, because everyone was quite happy to tell me that I should go to Embry and that I need to run quests for the Bankers, but nobody even said that you had to leave the bank, go into the area fenced off with concrete and find a big fancy house and the VIP vaults were up in the attic. I guess that's just too obvious to mention.

I went on the forums to ask where I could find some higher difficulty scavenge nodes, and the answer I got amounted to "just wander around until you find some".

Probably the most helpful source is the ingame "help" channel. Even listening in as I go about my business, I find out a lot of useful info when other people asked their questions and were answered.

Also, I hate going in blind because I always miss something vital. Like in LotRO I once sold off several Drops of Fine Clover Honey that I'd picked up while wandering about, completely unaware that they were vital ingredients in the next cooking recipe tier I hadn't yet unlocked.

Posted: Dec 20th 2009 9:54AM Pingles said

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Play and then start complaining in general chat!

THIS GAME IS LAME IT HAS NO MAIL!

Mail is in Capital cities by your trainer

Oh, cool, thanks!

Posted: Dec 20th 2009 12:13PM (Unverified) said

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LMAO
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Posted: Dec 20th 2009 10:17AM Enaris said

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I pretty much just dive in and try to learn through the school of hard knocks. As I go on, I'll consult Wiki's or the like for various specific issues, but my experience is the key way of learning.

Part of it is... I find alot of the text out there about games to be a bit obscure in terms of learning the game. Not that the writers aren't clear, but going from the "text you see" to the "effect in game" can be harder to see. Is a +5 defense buff good or not so hot? It depends. In a game like City of Heroes, where it's on a percentage basis, 5% isn't too bad. On the other hand,in LOTRO, where Evade Ratings can be in the thousands... 5 is pretty much lost in rounding errors.


So, I'm always very much "hands on" in my learning. It's one reason I don't "prebuild"my characters, or use guidebook builds. I want to get on the character and see how it actually works (and respec if need be)

Posted: Dec 20th 2009 11:33AM Jeromai said

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Trial and error.
Read, read, read.
Try some more.
Read some more.

Posted: Dec 20th 2009 12:25PM (Unverified) said

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Personally I hate looking basic stuff up online.

IMHO if a game can not explain the basics ingame, it has an issue. If I gotta go out of game and look up "how to craft" or "what your specialty points are" for example, it kinda kills it. Or worse yet, you spend points on something that you had no clue what you were doing because nothing ingame explained it then later you find out you messed up your character and there is no mechanic to fix it and you need to do a re-roll. If a game is going to give the opportunity to make a fatal error, it also needs to give you a way to correct it.

Now looking up more advanced stuff is another story, like what ingredients you need to make master level super mithril armor for example. I'm willing to do that.

But basically the game itself should teach how to do the basics and if you want more advanced info, you can go outside the game or ask the community.

A lot of old generation games are notorious for giving little to no game info up front which just frustrated the players.

Posted: Dec 20th 2009 1:24PM Tizmah said

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I just play the game really. I mean, I could ask on a forum or general help channel but..If it's a brand new MMORPG you might as well forget it. Forums normally consist of people bashing the game saying they don't like this or that, arguements and etc. You question probably will get a half-assed answer or none at all because your topic has already turned into a debate suddenly that someone riled up. Pretty pathetic point we are at in this genre right now, but it might just be the inevitable human nature seeping in since it's gotten so big now.

Pretty ridiculous these days. But yeah, I don't depend on people. The game should be able to teach you all you need to know. If I honestly can't find a particular boss/craft then I'll ask if anyone has the whereabouts.

Posted: Dec 20th 2009 4:57PM wjowski said

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By playing. It's not like MMOs are hard or anything. With the way some people act you'd think they were playing Street Fighter or something.

Posted: Dec 20th 2009 7:45PM cray said

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I use the wiki, as last resort. I would prefer that MMOs have their own in-game wiki, so that I don't lose that immersion.

Posted: Dec 22nd 2009 3:57PM (Unverified) said

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Can't help but comment on this... As I'm a part of the example used in the article "Paragon Wiki" you can obviously tell me inclinations towards learning a game leans more towards reading "walls of text".

However, in some community wikis and forums this can get over bearing and burn yourself out of even the most trivial of questions to a function, procedure, quest, mission, etc... within the game.

Forums are usually opinionated, most the time I find players who learned from these sources pickup the game relatively well... but the also tend to pickup that forum's sense of purpose within the game (which you should always develop your own) or in some cases even their bad-habits or bad practices.

Playing the game blind is never recommended and it's like adding salt to the wound in some games by bombarding chat with trivial (ultimately annoying) questions. Thankfully most of the mainstream games these days have a dedicated chat channel to avoid non-related flooding to otherwise important requests and such in global/general chats. So my opinion on asking in-game is; it's ok in moderation, but ask more than a handful of questions in a span of an hour and chances are you're going to start bugging people.

In my personal experiences I've found Wikis to be the best source of game information... like someone else in the comments stated only when they're up-to-date and are impartial. There seems to be a boom of wikis being started for games everyday... sadly mostly hosted on the eternal ad-campaign that is Wikia... which forces users/players to wade through obtrusive ads.
If you're going to start a wiki for your game, your best bet is to start your own. get a handful of interested writers that share your interest in bringing game info to the masses and before you know it... a community will now have a legitimate form of information that is both easy to read and easy to update.

Keep in mind no one likes to read "walls of text" so there is never any harm in adding a few bells and whistles to your wikis to make them more appeasing to the eye.

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