| Mail |
You might also like: WoW Insider, Joystiq, and more

Reader Comments (21)

Posted: Sep 10th 2009 11:50AM (Unverified) said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
Ah... thanks for that last paragraph. It makes me cross Blue Mars out of the horizon :)

What a pity, though. The avatars look nice. :)

Posted: Sep 10th 2009 11:42PM (Unverified) said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
Gwyneth, it's an issue with the CryEngine2. Crytek are only supporting windows at the moment although the next release also supports XBox and Playstation IIRC. Blue Mars works fine under bootcamp I've been told.
Reply

Posted: Sep 10th 2009 11:56PM (Unverified) said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
Jim himself runs it on a Mac with Bootcamp.
Reply

Posted: Sep 10th 2009 2:53PM Dblade said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
I don't really understand why Blue Mars and others like it focus so much on the developer/development aspect and give so little reason for people like me who plan to use the content as users to sign up. They talk about features like social site networking, etc, but I want to know if there is a, well, game in there. One worth playing.

I honestly think they should describe an actual Blue Mars created world, and show us how revolutionary it can be instead of focusing on it like a toolset. Your developers are only going to make money if we show up, and we need reasons to do so.

Posted: Sep 10th 2009 11:39PM daicon said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
That's because how well of a toolset this game is determines how much potential it will have to make it a game worth playing and is what gets Second Life players like myself excited. If you've spent anytime scripting in SL you'd know that developers wish they could make better content, but have to compromise with the crappy tools that SL gave them.

If you want them to describe it for users then go watch one of the trailers for the game on Youtube. They do a pretty good job there Is say.

Either way I think Blue Mars is kind of in a difficult position. From what I've read online, it seems caught between being a game that gamers don't like (social and shopping) and trying to establish itself in the ground that Second Life already has a firm hold on.

Either way all I can say is that it looks nicer than SL and from what I've tested, doesn't play as awkwardly as SL. I hope they can pull it off, as I'd love to start developing an RP or MMO city for it.
Reply

Posted: Sep 10th 2009 3:37PM Pingles said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
Summary of interview:

"Yes, it IS Second Life with a new engine."

Posted: Sep 10th 2009 6:52PM (Unverified) said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
really? for me the impression was that the focus was more on organizations and companies instead of user created content...
Reply

Posted: Sep 10th 2009 8:25PM (Unverified) said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
I do not see BlueMars as a 2nd second life with a new graphic engine.

Avatar Reality seems to set the focus a little bit different.
The content creation is much harder to learn and would therefor not be reachable for the masses of users. For sure the professionals will be happy to import from their Maya or 3D Studio, but the sometime creators with their Blender may need to wait just for now a bit until the BlueMars development hunts up.
I were able to upload the one default dress coming with the clothes-sandbox-editor, but were not realy able to make some new stuff.
All things get some steps forward but also more complex.

Imho the focusing on 'Citys' or 'Blocks' may in many technical ways a good and necessary move, but i ask my self, will we be able to have regattas through the grid? ( http://tr.im/jclassic09 ) I want to sail my vessel! :)

Ciao :)
Dil
Reply

Posted: Sep 10th 2009 7:18PM (Unverified) said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
From what i've heard, Blue Mars seems to be much hotter on IP rights too. Second Life has been making hand gesturing movements about this issue for years with little actual progress. The newish CEO Mark Kingdon addressed this issue as a major focus in his opening speech in 2008 yet nearly into 2010 nothing has changed. They have profited off content theft for years so I can understand their reluctance. LL cannot deny they make a profit off IP violations, anyone that has filed a DMCA with Linden Lab (via fax only I might add) will know will know what I am talking about. The limited safe harbour case with Louis Vuitton should underline that, going forward, that hosting an environment that *knowingly* enables rampant IP violations means you are equally liable. Any moves by SL so far on IP has been protective of the platform, not protective of its creative userbase. If you need to become taken seriously as a platform you need to be made open to public and independent scrutiny. I personally would welcome some form of independent industry body that can oversee disputes such as ICANN does for web domains. Despite what I have written I am also a huge fan of Second Life - I think a serious new player in the field is exactly what they need.

Posted: Sep 10th 2009 8:28PM (Unverified) said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
Are you saying that is a bad thing?

Posted: Dec 6th 2009 9:45PM (Unverified) said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
Concerning :
Pingles said on 3:37PM 9-10-2009

Summary of interview:

"Yes, it IS Second Life with a new engine."
Reply

Posted: Sep 10th 2009 9:23PM Joystiq Login Bugs SUCK said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
Absolutely creepy eyes.

Scary in fact.

Posted: Sep 10th 2009 11:54PM (Unverified) said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
DilSpi said: The content creation is much harder to learn and would therefor not be reachable for the masses of users

Please tell me you're joking. SL uses non-standard tools that are difficult to master and reliant on a stable connection. Workflow is heavily influenced by server lag. Worse, there are no backup facilities so an inventory glitch can wipe out your entire project. BM at least gives you the option of choosing your own tools, from Maya and 3ds Max to Blender and Sketchup - all of which have interchangeable formats and are heavily used in an assortment of industries. It also means existing models can be imported with few alterations. Having to build everything from scratch has kept many from utilising SL.

Posted: Sep 11th 2009 4:09AM (Unverified) said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
Windows only? Then I have no use for it.

Posted: Sep 11th 2009 4:53AM (Unverified) said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
Yes, well, that's the usual argument: "use Bootcamp". Seriously, that's not an option; if I had any interest in using Bootcamp, I'd buy a PC. To do serious development in Blue Mars, it's obvious that one will need a plethora of software applications (3D modelling tools, animation tools, graphical design tools), all of them requiring licenses, and as you might imagine, Mac users don't buy both licenses for the Mac and Windows platform — and trust me, all these licenses together cost way more than the hardware itself :)

And please, spare me the comment "there are perfectly reasonable open source applications out there which can do the same". Of course there are, but that's hardly the point: open source or not, you still require training and experience to use them — and be knowledgeable enough to deal with the required support once in a while on your own (browsing forums and googling for answers). So that's an option for some, or even for many, but not for all.

So one thing is to dabble around in Blue Mars to try it out just to say "cool, I've seen it, I'm impressed (or not)". That's certainly available to me, but it's at the same level of interest than going to a friend's place to play on his or her Playstation, Xbox, or Wii: enough to say that I've seen how it works, never enough to become a serious developer for it.

Then again, SL didn't support the Mac during their beta-testing, either — it came just in mid-2004, and a working Linux version even way later. Of course they made the right choice to go with OpenGL from the very beginning, so sooner or later Linden Lab could, if they wished, port it to different platforms. Choosing an engine that is not tied to a specific platform, graphics card, or technology (which becomes obsolete faster than we imagine) is, IMHO, the only option as a developer.

(If I had to choose one, I'd probably pick Unity3D, which supports Windows, Mac OS X, iPhone, Wii, and works embedded on a browser too — a range which is ideal for 3D social environments, even though CryEngine2 might be better if you target the gamer audience. From the interview, however, it sounds as if the Blue Mars team didn't exactly wish to limit themselves to gamers — perhaps because they did make some market analysis and found out that the mainstream users of 3D social environments are hardly gamers or 3D modellers. A pity their technological choice didn't follow their marketing choices).

On the plus side, from some reports I read, it seems that unlike what was feared 6 months ago, Blue Mars actually runs reasonably well on a computer that doesn't cost as much as a small car. That's at least very encouraging!

Posted: Sep 11th 2009 6:28AM (Unverified) said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
You also need to learn how to use the SL content creation tools. It's only those that have taken the extensive time to master the SL tools that are going feel shortchanged. Many of their skills are not transferrable because SL has its own custom way of doing things. At least if you're starting from scratch and you learn from the set available to use with BM you can transfer those skills to many real world industries or to other virtual worlds.
Reply

Posted: Sep 11th 2009 8:07AM daicon said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
I for one am glad that they are sticking to a platform, especially the most widely used one. I know it sucks for Mac and Linux users, but I imagine as things go farther along that options outside of Bootcamp and whatnot will become available to them.

The Crytek 2 engine looks gorgeous but I'll admit it did seem like an odd choice. As I've played the beta I can say it does look amazing.

I think that one of the largest obstacles for Blue Mars will be convincing users to move on from Second Life, which in my experience has been limited in the tools that it gives creators (As well as having a clunky, sluggish interface.) Atleast I will be moving on, and I'm glad that it's chosen to allow us to use industry tools that will be fun to learn and useful. Hell, even objects created for old gamemods that some of us have worked on and dropped will be useful again in some fashion.

These tools aren't hard to learn, and easy software such as Google Sketchup can be used by anyone. The SL tools and scripts have always been lacking in my opinon. Anyone ever used CCS for combot or RP oriented games? The devs for that did the very best they could with SL's limited tools. Now I'm looking at full Golf and Gliding games inside of Blue Mars and I'm thinking the possibilities are endless.

Basically, I think that now we want more than just a few days of socializing online, and Blue Mars really has that in mind, where SL is a sluggish experience and hasn't aged as well at all.
Reply

Posted: Sep 11th 2009 8:22AM (Unverified) said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
I got a steady 8fps throughout, which was quite acceptable. Early days yet.
Reply

Posted: Sep 13th 2009 6:36AM (Unverified) said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
Can anyone tell me if I can export my Second Life creations and buildings to Blue Mars? And will I be able to make some cash in Blue Mars and convert that to RL Dollars?

Ami

Posted: Sep 13th 2009 8:03AM (Unverified) said

  • 2 hearts
  • Report
Well, I can answer the first part. Second Life content wouldn't be transferable. You could recreate it in Blue Mars from scratch, as a registered developer, but the way content is built is completely different.
Reply
| 1 | 2 |

Featured Stories

EVE Evolved: EVE Online vs. Elite: Dangerous

Posted on Dec 21st 2014 6:00PM

WoW Archivist: A Glyphmas story

Posted on Dec 21st 2014 12:00PM

One Shots: Top 10 best player screenshots of 2014

Posted on Dec 21st 2014 10:00AM

Engadget

Engadget

Joystiq

Joystiq

WoW Insider

WoW

TUAW

TUAW