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Reader Comments (22)

Posted: Jul 21st 2009 8:09AM (Unverified) said

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Usually interesting worlds with new people, new challenges, and new adventures is simply what drives me within MMOs. I highly enjoy exploring new worlds and new systems, in addition to being a "social gamer" per-say while I am playing.

Posted: Jul 21st 2009 8:48AM (Unverified) said

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Completion! I am one of those people who cannot walk away from something unless I've finished it. As soon as I hit the level cap, see every location, finish PvE content, and tried PvP I log off and never see it again. Then I made the amazing mistake of trying Eve Online. I cannot get all the skills, there is always just one more skill I need before I can put it down. 1 more agent to increase standings with, 1 more corporation you need to teach a lesson about messing with my corporation. I need a 12 step program.

Posted: Jul 21st 2009 8:30AM Oneiromancer said

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I grew up playing huge open-world RPG series like Ultima (4-7.5 especially), Might and Magic (1-6), Baldur's Gate, and Elder Scrolls (all of 'em, so yes, starting with Arena). I loved exploring new worlds and being the hero of the story. So when there was a decline in single-player RPGs in 2003 or so, I finally tried EverQuest out, and was hooked by the huge world and variety of gameplay. And then with EQ2, WoW, and other newer games, I finally had enough storyline (and soloability) to feel like the hero.

The social aspect is the only thing that keeps me playing an MMO after I've reached max level and finished off the storyline quests. Otherwise I just drop my subscription until the next expansion comes out, and move on to other games. Since my largest community of friends is in WoW, that's the game I keep a subscription to pretty much constantly...but right now at least I only play it 2 nights a week.

Posted: Jul 21st 2009 8:51AM Mooncalled said

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When I first started playing it was just to be able to hang out with my friends. We all lived in different towns or cities. Now? It's all about the exploration. I love grinding out a map for that one hidden spot that the designers put all the extra effort into.

Posted: Jul 21st 2009 9:01AM (Unverified) said

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For me the list provided is just a list of elements that lend to the larger picture. If a world is flat and uninteresting all the challenging raids and intense PvP means nothing. What captures me is an immersive, detailed and fleshed out environment.

Character customization is big too. Player housing is nice when it's available. How much impact you have on a world is a big draw for me.

Posted: Jul 21st 2009 9:04AM Platypus Man said

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A combination of a good character customization system, good graphics (particularly gear) and a dynamic combat system.

Customization: I want to be able to be creative when it comes to designing my avatar. I like to be able to feel at least somewhat unique (as far as that goes in MMORPGs). Poor customization options can sometimes be a deal-breaker for me... I very nearly didn't play WoW because of the dearth of options!

Graphics: I can't deal with bad or outdated graphics - especially if I'm trying out an older game after it's been out for a while... Anarchy Online comes to mind. I know, I'm a dork, but graphics are important to the immersion factor and that's a big deal for me.

Combat: If the combat is a long and tedious process - like DAoC and WoW got to be after a while - I usually find that I'm going out of my way to actually avoid fights while trekking across the country. One of the things about games like Tabula Rasa (RIP) and Age of Conan is that the combat was so visceral and fun that I was going out and looking for trouble.

Posted: Jul 21st 2009 9:46AM (Unverified) said

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The ding.

Addicted to ding.™

Posted: Jul 21st 2009 9:22AM JohnD212 said

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The chance to get new armor or a new weapon...just something new...especially if its just a random drop.

Posted: Jul 21st 2009 9:28AM Pewpdaddy said

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For me games that live up to expectations mean a lot. If you tell the fighting system is new and dynamic it better be. Though in my opinion when they start throwing around words like "new" and "dynamic" it really means "broken". Don't over hype your game. Don't fill your plate for launch so you don't have time to fix bugs. One gripe I have too about some of the current MMO's, the zoned worlds. Half the fun of an MMO experience is roaming around exploring and running into that odd mob or super high level pat that eats you.

Posted: Jul 21st 2009 9:35AM elocke said

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Exploration of an open world/universe and partaking in a massive story. This is why FFXI appealed to me. Same with SWG pre Jedi. The rest of the game has to have a TON of options too and they must be fun and rewarding. I played WoW, liked it for its time, but since the game has NOT added more depth I have gravitated back to games like EQ2 and FFXI and am waiting anxiously for Champions Online, Star Trek Online and Star Wars the Old Republic.

All the other games coming down the pike, I'll give a shot, but I don't see them offering what I am looking for in a game. they all seem to be trying to fulfill other stuff like PVP and FPS type play. If that's what you like, go for it, but I prefer the more interactive stories and world exploration than anything else.

Posted: Jul 21st 2009 10:04AM (Unverified) said

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i'm a gatherer

I love finding a collecting stuff, gear, gold, items, harvesting stuff.

In a single player game it's still fun to do that, but doesn't hold as much thrill to me.

Plus the wife watches lots of soaps so a MMORPG is ideal for me to play on my laptop rather than having to watch Coronation sleep or Eastbenders.

Posted: Jul 22nd 2009 3:53AM GaaaaaH said

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For me it needs to be fun to play, and to have stuff to learn.

I know it's weird, but when i feel like there isn't much more to learn I get bored faster.

Posted: Jul 21st 2009 10:44AM (Unverified) said

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1.) Alternative Jobs (lke fishing, tanning mining, Potion Making, Herbalism, Cooking etc)
2.) Customizations (Crafting, Level/Requirement Refining, Armor and Weapon Synergy)
3.) Skills must not be limited to class only the Skill points requirement varies according to Job chosen
4.) PVP, Guild Vs Guild, Realm vs Realm, Server vs Server
5.) PVE, multiple quests, stories, some quest outcome can change the environment
6.) Economics (Price of goods can vary according to the demand)
7.) Weapon rarity (Normal weapon to Rare Weapons, Diamond or Card Slots)
8.) Specific PVP Maps (Dangerous Maps) and Territory Wars
9.) Big Worlds, (Less Loading better yet one big world like WOW)
10.) Graphics and Sounds (Lastly)

Posted: Jul 21st 2009 10:54AM (Unverified) said

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Raids!
Frankly, I hate levelling up in most MMO's, I find the quests, story and gameplay substandard compared to good old RPGs. Raiding with huge groups of people is what keeps me paying...which is why I quit wow when WotLK came out....I just wasn't bothered to go from 70-80 to start raiding again, and got down to EVE instead.

Posted: Jul 21st 2009 11:02AM Tom in VA said

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--Good story
--Creative world
--Soloability (with optional group content also)
--A dynamic/interactive in-game economy (crafting, auction house, etc.)

Tyranor, we just could not be any more different. :-)

Unlike you, I LOATHE the raid content (and so usually ignore it) but love the leveling and the quests.

Posted: Jul 21st 2009 12:33PM (Unverified) said

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It seems to be me for my girlfriend. We've had some recent struggles with WOW in the last couple months. She wished she could stop playing it so much because it makes her unable to think about anything else. She then blamed me, telling me I was too addicted. So I quit. Canceled my account, deleted the game from my hard drive so I knew I'd have to sit downloading and reinstalling for hours and hours to get back in.

She can't bring herself to quit the game or delete it. She hasn't been playing it though. Not even auctions. (Which she has trouble not doing even when she isn't really "playing")

It kind of sucks for me though. I've proved I'm not the addict, at least not to WOW specifically. Yet, I can't start playing again without screwing her up.

Posted: Jul 21st 2009 12:38PM (Unverified) said

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I think you can see from the comments why MMOs are so popular. It's like if you imagine an MMO as A,B,C,D,E.

One person loves to do B,C, another loves A,E, another loves C,D,E. They can all gather in the same game, enjoy the elements that they like together, and have that sense of shared accomplishment. While none of them are constrained to participate the elements they don't like. The ability to attract different types of gamers gives MMOs critical mass. An abundance of people helps facilitate all of the various activities thriving MMOs need.

Posted: Jul 21st 2009 4:14PM (Unverified) said

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Lately, nothing has. In fact, each day I drift farther from them, mainly do to poor quality and ridiculous repetition.

Posted: Jul 21st 2009 4:25PM cray said

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I'm really into customization of my avatar (cosmetically and skill-tree) and roleplaying. I tend to gravitate towards MMOs because of this. I like exploring (lore and realm) and co-op missions (guild play).

I'm less interested in non-storyline competitive play (Arena PvP) and virtual consumption (leveling up, acquiring end-game wares).

Posted: Jul 21st 2009 4:29PM ultimateq said

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Community. I am much more attracted a good community than to good gameplay. If I can get both, the game is a winner. But if I had to choose between a good community (Maybe like Vanguard), or a good game with a bad community (WoW), I'd probably pick the game with the good community.

But if I can get both in a game, you can bet I'll never leave. That is what drew me into EQ for the first time. In 1999/2000 when I started, the game play was revolutionary. And everyone was very nice and mature. I was hooked for over half a decade afterward.

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